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Sheriff's Deputy Call-Sign?

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  • Sheriff's Deputy Call-Sign?

    How would a Sheriff's Deputy identify himself via radio-com (in Texas)? I've searched endlessly online and can't find anything definitive.

    For instance, if a deputy were going to radio that he was going to inspect an abandoned building because he saw someone suspicious, what would he say? "Officer 309 to Dispatch. I'm at the abandoned mall at Langston and Queen. Saw someone suspicious enter. Gonna check it out. Over."

    That doesn't quite hit the believability note for me.

    Any advice?

  • #2
    Use their unit number. And it’s the receiving party first, not the transmitting party.

    “ Dispactch, 309. I’m checking an abandoned …”

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    • #3
      How about giving him the call sign "One Delta Ten Tango"?

      Comment


      • #4
        There are On Duty, patrol numbers that may change depending on the area / location that you're working in; your primary area or maybe backup.

        There is also your permanent number, that ID's who you are off duty, or working an off duty paid Detail.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ATBarker View Post
          For instance, if a deputy were going to radio that he was going to inspect an abandoned building because he saw someone suspicious, what would he say? "Officer 309 to Dispatch. I'm at the abandoned mall at Langston and Queen. Saw someone suspicious enter. Gonna check it out. Over."
          ID yourself, let HQ know what you've found and the location. If it's serious they'll ask if you want the air cleared of all other incoming / outgoing calls.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ATBarker View Post
            How would a Sheriff's Deputy identify himself via radio-com (in Texas)? I've searched endlessly online and can't find anything definitive.

            For instance, if a deputy were going to radio that he was going to inspect an abandoned building because he saw someone suspicious, what would he say? "Officer 309 to Dispatch. I'm at the abandoned mall at Langston and Queen. Saw someone suspicious enter. Gonna check it out. Over."

            That doesn't quite hit the believability note for me.

            Any advice?
            As a person who is not in Law Enforcement YOUR believability note isn't of much concern.

            After 9/11 most agencies went to plain language radio. You give your radio ID and then tell dispatch what you want them to know.

            It's hard for some of us who have used 10 Codes, or other radio signal codes for a long time but we try to accommodate the new system . Sometimes we mess up the call with a mixture of old and new

            Radio ID's are very dependent on the agency Sometimes they change by duty post , some places you have a number that never changes, some places you have an ID that might indicate your seniority with the agency .

            i am in a Sheriff's Office where my call sign never changes.

            I would call in :
            "County , 53-14, suspicious person entering the building at 5714 21st Ave, I will be checking the area, send backup"
            Last edited by Iowa #1603; 11-04-2021, 08:07 PM.
            My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Iowa #1603 View Post

              As a person who is not in Law Enforcement YOUR believability note isn't of much concern.

              After 9/11 most agencies went to plain language radio. You give your radio ID and then tell dispatch what you want them to know.

              It's hard for some of us who have used 10 Codes, or other radio signal codes for a long time but we try to accommodate the new system . Sometimes we mess up the call with a mixture of old and new

              Radio ID's are very dependent on the agency Sometimes they change by duty post , some places you have a number that never changes, some places you have an ID that might indicate your seniority with the agency .

              i am in a Sheriff's Office where my call sign never changes.

              I would call in :
              "County , 53-14, suspicious person entering the building at 5714 21st Ave, I will be checking the area, send backup"
              In this instance, what does 53-14 stand for? Let's say you were 1 of only 4 deputies at a sheriff's department in a very small county in Texas. Any idea how you'd identify yourself?

              Comment


              • #8
                Location / area of patrol.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
                  Use their unit number. And it’s the receiving party first, not the transmitting party.

                  “ Dispactch, 309. I’m checking an abandoned …”
                  Depends where you are at. Everywhere I've worked it is officer ID first.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ATBarker View Post

                    In this instance, what does 53-14 stand for? Let's say you were 1 of only 4 deputies at a sheriff's department in a very small county in Texas. Any idea how you'd identify yourself?
                    Unit numbers can be whatever you want. They can designate beats, shifts, and seniority or whatever you want. You can always google sheriff's call signs for Texas.

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                    • #11
                      And meowing over the air is usually discouraged by the supervisors, at least if they realize we're doing it...again...

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                      • #12
                        Everywhere is different. Where I'm at... Station, assignment, unit...

                        48-Paul-5, show me out on a suspicious vehicle at...

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                        • #13
                          ^ - - This....every department is different, there is no standard for a state, or department.

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                          • #14
                            From car to car, things can get even more casual: "Brian, the last time I had that guy, the girl with him was carrying his gun."...

                            Comment


                            • Iowa #1603
                              Iowa #1603 commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Especially on the encrypted channel

                          • #15
                            Originally posted by ATBarker View Post

                            In this instance, what does 53-14 stand for? Let's say you were 1 of only 4 deputies at a sheriff's department in a very small county in Texas. Any idea how you'd identify yourself?
                            I live in Iowa, I have no idea how that agency would identify their deputies

                            53-14 is my badge number and radio call number. 53 is the number of my county in alphabetically order. 14 is my individual number There is no other 53-14 in the state
                            Last edited by Iowa #1603; 11-07-2021, 10:45 PM.
                            My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                            Comment

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