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How would a F&W Game Warden identify himself when calling 911?

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  • How would a F&W Game Warden identify himself when calling 911?

    Does a Game Warden have a badge number? Or a call-sign? If an off-duty game warden were to call 911 during a shootout, how exactly would he identify himself as law enforcement?

  • #2
    They would do what any off duty cop would: Identify themselves as off duty and go from there.
    Now go home and get your shine box!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
      They would do what any off duty cop would: Identify themselves as off duty and go from there.
      Couldn't anyone say they're an off-duty cop? Do they not have to identify themselves via badge number?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ATBarker View Post
        Does a Game Warden have a badge number? Or a call-sign? If an off-duty game warden were to call 911 during a shootout, how exactly would he identify himself as law enforcement?
        It would depend on the area as to how they were numbered or "identified" in that area.

        Lets just say an off duty cop knows how to identify themselves in an emergency or in any communications with on duty cops.

        Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
        They would do what any off duty cop would: Identify themselves as off duty and go from there.
        Yepper!

        Originally posted by ATBarker View Post

        Couldn't anyone say they're an off-duty cop? Do they not have to identify themselves via badge number?
        Don't be obtuse........................

        Cops know cops
        Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

        My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ATBarker View Post
          Does a Game Warden have a badge number? Or a call-sign? If an off-duty game warden were to call 911 during a shootout, how exactly would he identify himself as law enforcement?
          Each game warden is assigned a different animal name, and then they add certain words to indicate they're off duty. For example

          "Sleepy Badger"
          "Tired Fox"
          "Lazy Woodchuck"
          "Resting Moose"
          "Hibernating Bear"

          You get the idea.

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          • #6
            The short answer is: it depends.

            In the area where they work it would be different than out of their jurisdiction... I may not even identify as an officer in a big city like Denver or out of state because it takes up time and doesn’t really matter.
            "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

            "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

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            • #7
              The badge number bull**** is in the movies and TV shows. Lot of places down here it's not even a permanent number. Change assignments, position, get promoted etc and it can change. Those numbers get recycled a lot too!

              If I have to call 911 I tend to tell them my name and who I work for and why I called. I don't give them my "badge number!" They don't care! It's not a requirement that I tell them I'm a LEO but if I don't they're likely to ask me 100 damn questions.

              Possum cops will likely have some call sign that may or may not be their "badge number." If they call 911 the operator probably won't care what their badge number is or isn't. If the caller volunteers it the operator may or may not put it somewhere in the call notes.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by westside popo View Post
                The badge number bull**** is in the movies and TV shows. Lot of places down here it's not even a permanent number. Change assignments, position, get promoted etc and it can change. Those numbers get recycled a lot too!

                If I have to call 911 I tend to tell them my name and who I work for and why I called. I don't give them my "badge number!" They don't care! It's not a requirement that I tell them I'm a LEO but if I don't they're likely to ask me 100 damn questions.

                Possum cops will likely have some call sign that may or may not be their "badge number." If they call 911 the operator probably won't care what their badge number is or isn't. If the caller volunteers it the operator may or may not put it somewhere in the call notes.
                This was very helpful. Thanks. Sounds like the most realistic way of doing this is to just give your name, your title if you want, and request assistance.

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                • westside popo
                  westside popo commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I will add that on duty state officers may occasionally get on the local radio (if they have compatible radios) net to coordinate with or relay information to local dispatchers and LEOs. And yes they then may use their call sign on the radio. The few times I've heard it they use the prefix DNR for possum cops and GSP for troopers before their regular call sign.
                  Last edited by westside popo; 03-12-2021, 07:29 PM.

              • #9
                I doubt he is going to have time to make a phone call during a shootout. Around here, if he wanted to make sure responding officers knew who he was and that he was armed, he would identify himself by name (Ofc. Smith) or as an ODO (Off Duty Officer.) Most officers and dispatchers have very limited contact with wildlife officers so, a wildlife officer identifying himself by badge or unit number isn't going to mean anything to almost everybody. If you get into very rural counties where everyone dispatches through the sheriff's office, you have a better chance of knowing that unit #123 is a wildlife officer.

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                • #10
                  Originally posted by ATBarker View Post

                  This was very helpful. Thanks. Sounds like the most realistic way of doing this is to just give your name, your title if you want, and request assistance.
                  You mean like what I posted..?
                  Now go home and get your shine box!

                  Comment

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