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A Sensitive Subject - Smartphone Tracking/Eavesdropping

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  • #16
    And those personal messages are subject to inspection AND a good defense attorney will raise the question WHY this Officer is sending texts that auto delete..?

    Stupid. Just stupid.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by not.in.MY.town View Post
      More likely, that LT was trying to make the same point that most supervisors/admins try to get their troops to understand: "Don't use your personal phone for work. If you do, you run the risk of having it subpoenaed or used as part of an internal investigation".
      Even more importantly, be like Atlanta Officer Garrett Rolfe, who justifiably shot a violent criminal and was charged for political reasons: Secure your phones. The corrupt DA seized his personal phone because he used it to call his coworkers after the shooting. The corrupt DA can't, fortunately, access the contents of the phone and Rolfe cannot be compelled to access it for them, denying them any potential ammunition to use against him in an unjust, politically motivated prosecution. So, clearly, even good cops need to be able to protect their privacy against unwarranted and unjust intrusions, such as this case, because there shouldn't even BE a criminal case. Sure, it's not going to help you in an internal investigation where you can be fired for your lack of cooperation, but if you're already unjustly fired and need to protect your data from a corrupt DA, then having a strong passcode, disabling Face ID and/or fingerprint ID and ensuring your device is set to wipe after a certain number of failed access attempts is a good way to do it. Also, not to beat a dead horse, use Signal and set messages to auto delete after a short period of time.

      [As far as you using your work phone for all your personal affairs, that's probably another issue in itself. Perhaps you have cleared that with your employer. It sure wouldn't fly here. Why should your agency (and ultimately the general public) pay for your personal phone calls and data usage? Even if it's a flat rate and unlimited data, etc etc. It still seems inappropriate.]
      It is unlimited data, so they don't care and have said so, with the express understanding that we know the phone and all data on it belongs to them. They'd be paying the same rate if I made 10,000 calls a month, or zero calls, same for data. I'm not going to carry two phones around, it just doesn't make any sense. I'm now actually in charge of the cell phones at my agency, funnily enough. They have discussed giving us a monthly stipend toward paying for our own personal phones so that we can get out of the business of buying and issuing phones, but doesn't seem like they're going to go through with it.
      Be dangerous, and unpredictable... and make a lot of noise. - John Bush, Anthrax

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      • #18
        Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
        And those personal messages are subject to inspection AND a good defense attorney will raise the question WHY this Officer is sending texts that auto delete..?

        Stupid. Just stupid.
        Oy vey. If I could buy this guy for what he's actually worth and sell him for what he thinks he's worth, best investment in the history of investing. Attorneys raise questions about all kind of stuff, all the time, all an app like Signal proves is that you wanted to have private conversations with people, which is neither a crime, nor inherently nefarious. I'd have no problem answering that question should it ever be asked. I myself use it to have conversations with reporters, who like to have certain conversations off the record. Again, it's literally no different than closing a door and having a private meeting with someone, an act that is necessary in this job all the time. If I worried about every possible thing a defense attorney could say I'd never get anything done, like some people that populate this board probably don't.
        Be dangerous, and unpredictable... and make a lot of noise. - John Bush, Anthrax

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        • #19
          Obviously....you’ve never dealt with this nor have any experience in it...

          Ill stake my years of knowledge against your EPIC stupidity anytime.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by ehbowen View Post
            She's less concerned about "official" (subpoena) checks than she is about, say, a scan of her data by a Google insider. Was wanting to see if any of your agencies were concerned about reducing your attack surface to such matters.
            This is an LE focused forum so the depth of knowledge and experience here is going to be largely based on "official" checks pursuant to court orders related to criminal investigations. If your question is..."What kind of access do Google employees have to user information?" and more specifically..."What kind of nefarious activity could be facilitated by an employee?"...then you're probably not going to get a useful answer.

            In terms of whether our agencies are concerned about reducing our vulnerability on agency-issued devices...we're issued these devices specifically because we all understand they are for official business and the data/usage is going to be discoverable in a court case. We use them in accordance with agency-prescribed policies. At least that's been my experience so far in my career. I can't speak for every agency/department in the US.

            Comment


            • ehbowen
              ehbowen commented
              Editing a comment
              Fair enough. So would it be accurate to presume that, at least as far as you are aware, the agency which issued you these phones has not taken the possibility of extra-legal actions and threats against you into serious consideration?

          • #21
            Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
            Obviously....you’ve never dealt with this nor have any experience in it...

            Ill stake my years of knowledge against your EPIC stupidity anytime.
            ?u=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.com%2F-oPcdfWpEGgs%2FVFF236LEhpI%2FAAAAAAAAgAw%2FYL28IeRJRB8%2Fs1600%2FRay%252BLiotta%252BLaughing%252BIn%252BGoodfellas.jpg&f=1&nofb=1.jpg
            Be dangerous, and unpredictable... and make a lot of noise. - John Bush, Anthrax

            Comment


            • Four g63
              Four g63 commented
              Editing a comment
              Worlds fakest laugh

          • #22
            little off topic, but I had a Lieutenant that claimed that he had the right to seize our personal cell phones and strip them for any and all data, for any reason or for no reason, if we used our phones for any work purposes, like taking evidence photos or calling our beat partners.
            The way my old SO worked, is they would pay for your phone... but that made it theirs if they wanted it. If they didn’t pay they had to get a warrant.

            ...and if you gather any evidence with it, it Isn’t discoverable but it is subpoena-able. The defense can look for any undiscovered evidence. I’ve seen that happen.

            Fair enough. So would it be accurate to presume that, at least as far as you are aware, the agency which issued you these phones has not taken the possibility of extra-legal actions and threats against you into serious consideration?
            yep. I doubt it’s even occurred to anyone to think past the potential for court-related shenanigans.

            our body cam is an app on our phones, which tracks us by gps everywhere we go... camera on or off... and the camera can be remote activated by command staff. Plus the gps on our cars. Any of that could be hacked.

            That said, my address can be found by searching the county assessors website, and I park my marked SRO car in my driveway during good weather. It’s no secret where I live.
            Last edited by tanksoldier; 10-26-2020, 07:06 PM.
            "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

            "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

            Comment


            • ehbowen
              ehbowen commented
              Editing a comment
              While I'm writing this story for entertainment, I'm also wanting to work in practical advice as to how people might "harden" their digital profile, if they wish.

            • Aidokea
              Aidokea commented
              Editing a comment
              Gaston Glock...

          • #23
            Originally posted by ehbowen View Post
            While I'm writing this story for entertainment, I'm also wanting to work in practical advice as to how people might "harden" their digital profile, if they wish..
            There are plenty of browses and browser extensions that help with this. I use Firefox and a combination of the following browser add-on extensions:

            Disconnect
            Facebook Container
            Canvas Defender
            Adblock Plus
            Ghostery
            Privacy Badger

            I have configured my browser for privacy for a long time (at least as, as much as can possibly be achieved), and I am always tweaking the settings and looking for new tools, you can't be static with it. Interestingly enough, I don't get ANY of the text spam that people are getting on their phones and I haven't seen an ad on a YouTube video in the last ten years on my machine. Another good practice that I only use on my phone is to have a VPN. Also, BIG one here: use different user names and email addresses across different sites, especially when signing up for something. I use Trashmail if I want to sign up for a trial service or something where I need to receive a verification email, it gives you a disposable address that forwards to your real address so you don't have to reveal your real email address.

            Use a password manager so that if your password is compromised in a hack of one service, the hackers don't have your credentials for other sites.

            Whatever services you have that offer Two-factor authentication, turn it on. If you have the money to spend, get an RSA security token (physical or virtual).

            I also don't use my actual credit card number when making purchases online, my bank (and many others) supports Privacy.com, where you can create "virtual" cards that are linked to your actual card number and set limits of how much can be charged to it. Example: I signed up for a trial service and, knowing it can often be time consuming and difficult to cancel a service, I created a virtual card number and set it for $1 max, one-time use so that if they didn't cancel, the most I'd lose would be a dollar. If a site I used stores credit card numbers and that data gets hacked, no big deal to me, because that virtual card is already going to be shut off by the time that happens anyway.

            None of these things are going to make you disappear, but they will muddle your trail and make it hard enough to track you so that most people would be unwilling or unable to. When it comes to Big Tech and Big Brother, unless you're totally off grid somewhere, it's hard to cover your tracks so completely that they can't find you. I was on a US Marshal's Task Force for about 8 years... if you leave so much as a single thread of data online, they're going to unravel it until it gets back to you. Unless you have the kind of resources and/or lifestyle to make it onto their top 15 Most Wanted, they will find you if they want to. I have to assume Big Tech could do just as well, if not better, with all that they collect. Most people don't have what it takes financially or in the ability to cut all ties to be that good at hiding.
            Be dangerous, and unpredictable... and make a lot of noise. - John Bush, Anthrax

            Comment


            • ehbowen
              ehbowen commented
              Editing a comment
              Well, for the purposes of my story it's neither necessary nor desirable that either of my characters completely "disappear" (well, at least for this installment...maybe in future?). It's only necessary to keep any would-be snoopers from learning, by means fair or foul, that the female character is actually an angel in human disguise.

          • #24
            future?). It's only necessary to keep any would-be snoopers from learning, by means fair or foul, that the female character is actually an angel in human disguise.
            Her boss can simply make it so?
            "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

            "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

            Comment


            • ehbowen
              ehbowen commented
              Editing a comment
              Well, in the world of my story, that's not how it works. (I'm postulating) God gave the angels, and humanity (crack open your Bible!) the information needed for ultimate long-term victory some nineteen hundred-plus years ago. Now it's in their (and our) hands. As long as things remain "on track" (railroad metaphor there!), God stays mum. If it gets to the point where real Divine Intervention is essential to save the day, the enemy wins...at least an "extended play", if not a whole new game.

              Edit To Add: To be a bit more forthcoming, if the story becomes an ongoing series the two characters will discover some "Easter Eggs" along the way to help them out. As they need them. They still have the burden of doing the right thing and making the right choices based upon what they have been given up to that point.
              Last edited by ehbowen; 11-01-2020, 04:27 PM.

            • tanksoldier
              tanksoldier commented
              Editing a comment
              Interesting. There is a role play game game, called In Nomine, originally from France but picked up by Steve Jackson Games and published using their GURPS system with a similar premise... a war between Heaven and Hell, with human souls as the praise... and a deity who has withdrawn to the higher heavens until the war is decided.

              Hovwever, I’d point out that the ability to hide oneself isn’t about the choice between good and evil... but if the agreement is that the contest will be fought on the mortal plane and decided using only mundane means, then that’s one thing.

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