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Perceptions of British policing

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  • #16
    Originally posted by 9L81 View Post
    All I know is what I have seen in the documentary on British policing called Hot Fuzz. Seems like a cool gig.
    Hot Fuzz is basically a documentary of British policing. Only with some funny bits thrown in. Yarp.

    I'm a little bit waayy, a little bit wooah, a little bit woosh, I'm a geezer.

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    • #17
      1573666109303.png

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Saluki89 View Post
        We've worked together haven't we?

        I'm a little bit waayy, a little bit wooah, a little bit woosh, I'm a geezer.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Cockney Corner. View Post
          We've worked together haven't we?



          In all seriousness, what has happened to the British Police? Why has it become like this?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by beachcop05 View Post
            In all seriousness, what has happened to the British Police? Why has it become like this?
            It's a bit of an expansive question. What has happened to the British Police? Well, we're still here. In terms of perceptions (or rather the images in the meme above) we have men marching with a banner saying "No democracy we just want Islam", images from the 2011 Tottenham riots, something about grooming gangs and a pug looking cute. Against that we have Sgt Nicholas Angel and PC Danny Butterman successively eating ice creams and then springing into action with firearms. In fairness, in the film Sgt Angel is observing passersby for suspicious activity and arrests a thief shortly afterwards, but I assume the suggestion is that the Police over here do nothing (except where pugs are at risk)?

            Looking at them one by one, I have no idea where the first image was taken. A very quick internet search suggests Dearborn, Michigan, but this may not be true. If it was the UK, that would be freedom of expression. We let the Nazis march too.

            I was on holiday during the 2011 riots, so didn't get involved in their policing. However, the riots didn't have anything to do with Islam - the spark was a supposedly unarmed man named Mark Duggan being shot dead by Police. Duggan was an armed gangster. Sorry, he was, Mark Duggan fans. The rioters did what rioters do - looted and essentially gave into their base instincts. And we had to pick up the pieces (there were copycat riots across Britain with like minded criminals).

            The grooming gangs issue is a perennial one of men sexually exploiting vulnerable young girls. The simple fact is that we only have so many Police and you tend to concentrate what is under your nose. The girls these people selected were often marginalised and highly unlikely to go to the Police. I won't pretend everything we've done has been perfect but we have tried to address this issue and there have been a lot of convictions for offences which are hard to prove.

            And pugs are cute. Wouldn't you want to rescue a pug? If not, then you are a monster. Fact.

            I'm a little bit waayy, a little bit wooah, a little bit woosh, I'm a geezer.

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            • #21
              I was in London back in September and had a chat with a few ARV members from The Met. Really good group of fellas. And had a few brief interactions with some bobbies and found them extremely helpful and professional. Overall, they seemed very relaxed.

              I was in Belfast and Londonderry (I know NI isn't Britain, but regardless) the following week and they were noticabley more on-edge. I was pulled over in Londonderry, for what they said was a routine check. The two officers both approached my car with their hands on their firearms and asked me what my business was there. When they heard my accent they relaxed a bit but the member talking to me at the driver's side window had his hand on his firearm the entire encounter. They did some checks on me and sent me on my way. It was definitely a stark contrast to my experiences in England.
              ​​​​​
              ​​​​In regards to routine arming, I believe New South Wales is the only department in Australia that has armed their members since, or near enough to inception; though it's worth noting that female members could not carry firearms for general duties (patrol) until 1979; detectives were allowed to carry from '74. In Victoria, female police had to keep their firearms in their police-issued handbag up until 1986. I believe mandatory arming of general duties police came about sometime in the 70's, but I'm fairly certain (male) detectives had the option to carry for decades prior.

              In Queensland, carrying was optional up until 1975. I'm pretty sure most other states and territories followed suit around the same period. Intrestingly enough, the Northern Territory Police were only armed on night shift up until the late 1990s, which is odd considering it was and still is a rather crime-ridden region. Around the time the daytime general duties members were unarmed, the murder rate there sat at around 14 per 100,000 residents.
              Last edited by CaptainKangaroo5691; 12-01-2019, 08:40 PM.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by CaptainKangaroo5691 View Post
                I was in London back in September and had a chat with a few ARV members from The Met. Really good group of fellas. And had a few brief interactions with some bobbies and found them extremely helpful and professional. Overall, they seemed very relaxed.

                I was in Belfast and Londonderry (I know NI isn't Britain, but regardless) the following week and they were noticabley more on-edge. I was pulled over in Londonderry, for what they said was a routine check. The two officers both approached my car with their hands on their firearms and asked me what my business was there. When they heard my accent they relaxed a bit but the member talking to me at the driver's side window had his hand on his firearm the entire encounter. They did some checks on me and sent me on my way. It was definitely a stark contrast to my experiences in England.
                ​​​​​
                ​​​​In regards to routine arming, I believe New South Wales is the only department in Australia that has armed their members since, or near enough to inception; though it's worth noting that female members could not carry firearms for general duties (patrol) until 1979; detectives were allowed to carry from '74. In Victoria, female police had to keep their firearms in their police-issued handbag up until 1986. I believe mandatory arming of general duties police came about sometime in the 70's, but I'm fairly certain (male) detectives had the option to carry for decades prior.

                In Queensland, carrying was optional up until 1975. I'm pretty sure most other states and territories followed suit around the same period. Intrestingly enough, the Northern Territory Police were only armed on night shift up until the late 1990s, which is odd considering it was and still is a rather crime-ridden region. Around the time the daytime general duties members were unarmed, the murder rate there sat at around 14 per 100,000 residents.
                Routine check, yeah right.....You can take Captain K out of Victoria, but you can’t take Victoria out of Captain K.

                Welcome back Capt. K.
                Last edited by BTDT2; 12-29-2019, 10:30 PM.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by emtguy89 View Post
                  Nothing personally directed towards you, or to try and start a fight, but after the "hate speech" laws, Rotherham and other huge scandals involving several thousand sex trafficking victims, most of which were ignored, some who were threatened, arrested, or even raped by the police when they reported the crimes...

                  I have vacationed in a fairly repressive dictatorship where my father-in-law is a police political commissar. They still make far fewer arrests for social media posts, and sex crimes/human trafficking are properly investigated (the perpetrators generally being put to death). And until 2014, they were also unarmed.

                  Sorry, but I can't say I hold British law enforcement in particularly high regard.
                  Im betting the low arrest rate is due to bribery, low quality police, and govt direction, not quality cops.
                  Now go home and get your shine box!

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                  • #24



                    This meme going around always gets me laughing....but on a serious note, my perception is that the British government in general has now focused on the weapons these mentally-ill folk like to use instead of trying to address why they're mentally-ill to begin with. In turn, it seems as though the Parliament has tied the hands of officers and isn't allowing them to do actual police work. I could be wrong, I don't keep up with what goes on "across the pond" but that's just my perception.
                    Last edited by COMoparfan392; 12-30-2019, 01:29 PM.
                    "It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather we should thank God that such men lived."- George S. Patton Jr.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by COMoparfan392 View Post
                      my perception is that the British government in general has now focused on the weapons these mentally-ill folk like to use instead of trying to address why they're mentally-ill to begin with
                      It's an expansive question. I would say about a third of calls to Police relate to Mental Health. Mentally ill people phoning in with weird tips or just to engage with someone, mentally ill people at risk, mentally ill people who potentially or actually pose risk to others. The mentally ill (I'll go with MH from now on) may choose to arm themselves with knives for whatever reason. Not a lot we can do. Can't ban knives. The question of why people have MH issues isn't one for the Police - we just pick up the pieces because we're the only people, other than Ambo, who'll pick up the phone at 3 in the morning. Probably true the world over.

                      In turn, it seems as though the Parliament has tied the hands of officers and isn't allowing them to do actual police work. I could be wrong, I don't keep up with what goes on "across the pond" but that's just my perception.
                      I've separated out two questions which probably should be dealt with as one. Police shouldn't be dealing with MH issues because people with MH issues are not criminals. Even when they do awful things, they're literally not in their right minds. I reckon about half of people coming into police custody claim to have MH issues but frankly, a lot of them are full of sh*t (multiple personality disorder is a popular self diagnosis even though in the real world dissociative identity disorder is really, really rare). But who else is going to deal with Mr Paranoid Schizophrenic off his meds armed with a knife? As to whether Parliament ties our hands? Huge question. Very, very quick answer, it's more down to an unwillingness, by The Powers That Be, for Police to actually use existing powers.

                      I'm a little bit waayy, a little bit wooah, a little bit woosh, I'm a geezer.

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                      • NW121
                        NW121 commented
                        Editing a comment
                        I think the unwillingness of the Powers That Be is a universal problem on both sides of the pond. Everyone wants the police to pick up the pieces, do the crap work, and wear a hundred different hats but they don't want to empower them to do a half of what's asked.

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