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  • The MMA Discussion Dojo

    MMA (More commonly known as Mixed Martial Arts) is obviously gaining more and more mainstream attention. I know that *some* LE Agencies actually train (to a degree) some form of Mixed Martial Arts, and there are some professional fighters that actually offer an LE based training course(s) (See - Pat Militech)

    With that said, do any of you enjoy the sport of MMA? And do you train in your off time?

    Personally, I am a HUGE MMA addict. (Yes I have a problem) I work with several promoters here on the amateur/pro circuits doing jobs from fighter interviews, emceeing, and PBP/Commentary. Long story short - I love MMA and try to get my fix whenever humanly possible. Sure my cable bill has been beyond astronomical on some months, but addictions like this MUST be fed
    There are 3 sides to every story - Your lawyer, their lawyer, and forensics.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Joe Mama View Post
    MMA (More commonly known as Mixed Martial Arts) is obviously gaining more and more mainstream attention. I know that *some* LE Agencies actually train (to a degree) some form of Mixed Martial Arts, and there are some professional fighters that actually offer an LE based training course(s) (See - Pat Militech)

    With that said, do any of you enjoy the sport of MMA? And do you train in your off time?

    Personally, I am a HUGE MMA addict. (Yes I have a problem) I work with several promoters here on the amateur/pro circuits doing jobs from fighter interviews, emceeing, and PBP/Commentary. Long story short - I love MMA and try to get my fix whenever humanly possible. Sure my cable bill has been beyond astronomical on some months, but addictions like this MUST be fed


    I love MMA and watch Strikeforce and usually host parties for the UFC fights.




    In our academy we trained MMA because it works and also because more civilians are learning it. In fact we had a PC Pick Up for a guy who is rising in the amateur ranks of MMA and he's a bad guy.




    I don't train but some of our guys do. It also helps that one of our guys owns an MMA studio.

    .

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    • #3
      Thats good to hear that they are starting to incorporate it into some academys training programs. I had the opportunity to sit and chat with Pat Militech a while back and he sounds like he has the 'right' training plan geared towards LE. (As well as a really neat and stand up guy)

      As far as the fighters themselves, for the most part they are all really cool and down to earth guys. But of course there are always one or two exceptions but they tend to get put in their place rather quickly. (There is nothing worse than a guy who talks trash and can actually back it up)

      I too host UFC parties at my place as well. If its a houseful of people or just me - its all the same. Well, since I dont drink alcohol when its me it tends to be a bit quieter.

      One thing that I have found rather interesting is the HUGE differences when it comes from the amateur circuit to the pro circuit. With EITHER circuit, you have to have a sanctioning body. They basically make sure the fighters come in on weight, fights are evenly matched based on experience, provide the judges and referees for the fights and are pretty much the overall authority when it comes to the fights and whether the fighters get in there or not.
      Now, when it comes to the amateur circuit, the sanctioning bodies are usually comprised of fellow fighters, coaches - (Blue belt in BJJ is usually a prereq to be a judge/ref) and it is much easier to work with these people as they understand the game moreso from a fighters prospective.
      The pro circuit is MUCH different. While a good portion of the state sanctioning bodies are comprised of the ammy officials, the 'top end' of these folk remind me of those Holiday Inn Express commercials. (In other words - they are VERY disconnected from the game)
      Dont believe me? Ive got two words for you - Cecil Peoples.
      There are 3 sides to every story - Your lawyer, their lawyer, and forensics.

      Comment


      • #4
        I love MMA. I love to watch UFC, WEC, and all of the Euopean and Asian versions.

        While I do like the moves, I think it can actually be risky to train in it. MMA teaches you to go to the ground to fight, but of course, we don't want the fight to go to the gorund. As the saying goes, you fight like you train. I think more and more martial arts forms are incorporating some ground skills as a necessity. I train in the Choy Li Fut style of Kung Fu, which is a combination of Southern and Northern Kung Fu styles. I absoultely love it. It has discipline, fitness, and morality as a part of the training along with the moves, which are very effective. Also, the "moves" include stances and forms. The stances not only train you in lower body strength and balance, they are essential to many of the moves. The forms are a series of moves which train you in discipline, concentration, application of the moves, and how to combine moves.

        Sorry, I know this thread is about MMA, but I'm really high on what I'm studying and think its a great system. Which it should be since it was the first martial arts form developed.

        But yes, I love the MMA. I just hate the uber doosh that think they are badass because they watch it or can wear certain clothing.
        I yell "PIKACHU" before I tase someone.

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        • #5
          Good point,

          However, I think that MMA training (for real life situations) should incorporate things like being comfortable IF it happens to go to the ground and knowing how to react (and keep your weapon safe) I think the focus should be made to 'Chuck Liddell' it and get it back to the feet. I dont think TOO much focus should be spent on fighting your opponent on the ground, but more of a making sure that you can at least survive and get to your feet or at least gain/maintain control of the situation.

          I had a Korean buddy in high school that was fluent in a form of Kung Fu. Beautiful (and practical) art. Thankfully I think he only had to 'test' its practicality once or twice
          There are 3 sides to every story - Your lawyer, their lawyer, and forensics.

          Comment


          • #6
            My Sifu (instructor) had a student who had to defend himself from an armed robber (knife) a week or so ago. He had only been training for a couple of months.

            I agree with you Joe. Maybe my statement got lost in my rambling earlier. I do think that most styles are incorporating some ground combat out of necessity. We just have to be able to fight and survive IF the fight goes to the ground. I'd prefer officers to be fluent in Kung Fu, Kenpo, or the style which was used in "Taken". If you've ever seen that, Liam Neeson has some sweet (quick, practical, and efficient) moves in it.
            I yell "PIKACHU" before I tase someone.

            Comment


            • #7
              I love martial arts of all forms whether they be traditional or modern. I believe they all serve a great purpose. I have trained in various styles throughout the years including Mi Jhong Lou Han(northern style long-fist kung fu), Tae Kwon Do, and a touch of boxing but I currently train in Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu. In my opinion it is a very well rounded art. Historians and theatrics have done a good job of negatively stereotyping the ninja, but training this art has really done wonders for me. Taijutsu utilizes every single part of your body as a weapon(we call them tools). I reccomend looking it up to see if anyone trains it in your area. CUtting to the point, my sensei's sensei, Shihan Robert Johnson has trained in for over 28 years now. He is an incredible human being and I strive to be like him in many ways. He served the Marion County Sheriff's Department for around 25 years. His department trusted him enough to arrest Mike Tyson awhile back when he was suspected of rape, I believe that was the alleged charge anyway. He said that Tyson didn't give him any trouble thankfully. I thought it was an interesting story. I saw that there were a few officers up here in Indiana and Indianapolis. His dojo is in Indianapolis and he used Taijutsu on duty for 20+ years. Bujinkan practitioners in our art try to teach that rank is not of much importance, but he is at the terminal rank of Ju Godan(15th degree black). In Japan, the grandmaster Soke Hatsumi Masaaki has his dojo. I have seen and heard him do unbelievable things and he is 80 years old. He has 4 Shihan under him, one or all of which will take his place when he passes the title. Sensei Johnson is the only person other than Soke and the four Shihan with his picture up in the Honbu dojo. If anyone enjoys reading, learning about a martial art, or are interested to see if there are any dojos near you, I am posting a link below. Google is also your friend, but Wikipedia only provides a brief description. My apologies if I went on a bit of a tangent. I love training Taijutsu, and I reccomend it to all of you.


              http://www.winjutsu.com/winlinks.html
              Last edited by Jake81; 04-15-2011, 09:16 AM. Reason: additional info

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              • #8
                I love just about all forms of martial arts as they instill a sense of discipline and confidence at a core level, and can provide an 'auto-pilot' mode (if you will) if and when you are put into a bad situation. Currently, I have my daughter enrolled in a BJJ class. She is 10 now and has been doing it for at least 3 years - so far she still enjoys it. I honestly wish my parents would have been as dedicated to my training when I was a kid as I am with her, but this gives me the op to enjoy it vicariously.
                There are 3 sides to every story - Your lawyer, their lawyer, and forensics.

                Comment


                • #9
                  .

                  Many MMA moves wouldn't be useful in police work, but some are, such as an RNC, takedowns, and striking.


                  Training MMA also helps cops realize that they aren't invincible, and skill level is, how much cardio they actually have, and their strength and weaknesses.

                  .

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jake81 View Post
                    Historians and theatrics have done a good job of negatively stereotyping the ninja
                    Yes, Ninjas and Ninjitsu are awesome. It's amazing how even today's special forces use tecniques invented by the ninjas.
                    I yell "PIKACHU" before I tase someone.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I use to train before I moved.. I was training at a place call Mellinia (spelling?) in rancho cucamonga, was taking brazilian jiu jitsu and muay tai (again spelling) ps:im a horrable speller
                      Gotta catch em allll.........

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Rudy8116 View Post
                        Yes, Ninjas and Ninjitsu are awesome. It's amazing how even today's special forces use tecniques invented by the ninjas.
                        Yes sir, when applied properly it is a very effective combat art. To****sugu Takamatsu, the grandmaster before our current one, was victorious in atleast 58 life and death matches. Part of the training for the more serious practicioners is conditioning your body for combat. Stories say Takamatsu Sensei had conditioned his hands to the point he could strip bark from a tree with a swipe. The art dates back a long long time ago. I've been told many different dates, but I believe around 1100 or before. Only 9 lineages have survived through history(that I know of). If you are interested....there is a book called Ninjutsu History and Tradition by Soke Hatsumi. It provides a great deal of the history, many of the different parts of the art, and countless other information. I am still a little depressed that we are not going to be making our trip to Japan this year due to all the mess going on. A neighboring dojo is putting on a special workshop to raise funds for the relief effort; calling it Help Heal Japan. Im excited for it. He gathered a bunch of the different instructors throughout the community(that teach different arts) and each will have an hour to lead the workshop. It will be interesting to have all these other martial artists to train alongside, and it's for a good cause.

                        Book: http://www.amazon.com/Ninjutsu-Histo...3047552&sr=8-1
                        Last edited by Jake81; 04-17-2011, 08:46 AM. Reason: spelling

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                        • #13
                          Bujinkan.

                          The original mixed martial art.
                          NRA Life Member

                          The police are the public and the public are the police; the police being only members of the public who are paid to give full time attention to duties which are incumbent on every citizen in the interests of community welfare and existence. - Sir Robert Peel

                          Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin to slit throats. - H. L. Mencken

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