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  • Old people driving

    spring cleaning of old dusty posts
    Last edited by e-man; 04-17-2008, 12:46 AM.
    I got nothing for now

  • #2
    I once saw an "senior" lady driving her car down the bike path in the city park. the path and the road are seperated by about 50 yds or so.
    si vis pacem para bellum

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    • #3
      more of the same cleaning going on
      Last edited by e-man; 04-17-2008, 12:47 AM.
      I got nothing for now

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      • #4
        Why is it every time you seem like you NEED to get somewhere fast. (I am not talking about speeding 10+ the speed limit) But just normal driving 4 or 5 mph over the speed limit in town, there is ALWAYS A) Someone pulls out in front of you and doesn't know where they are going or B) Someone is driving 5 to 10 mph under the F*&() speed limit and you can't pass them.

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        • #5
          The elderly say they're not bad drivers and that most accidents don't involve them. I beg to differ. More of my close calls to having my car written off have been caused by trying to avoid elderly drivers who misjudged the amount of time it takes to turn or by not seeing me.

          My grandma rolled their truck on a gravel road a year ago this month. The speed limit on Saskatchewan grid roads is 80 km/h unless otherwise marked. It's estimated that she was going well over 100 km/h nearing the 140 mark with her cruise control set. Even I don't drive faster than 80 on gravel roads. You'd think she would have learned her lesson after that, but back in August I was riding with her in her van to the lake. We were about 3 hours late and when we got to the gravel road I watched the speedometer. 80 kph, 85 kph, 90 kph, 95 kph, 100 kph. All this while I'm thinking to myself that everything in a vehicle becomes a flying purjectile in an accident and that a Kleenex box on the back window can break your neck in a accident. All around me was two scooters, a huge piece of wood, a drill, and various other objects. Luckily we made it there safe though.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Spee-Dee
            The elderly say they're not bad drivers and that most accidents don't involve them. I beg to differ. More of my close calls to having my car written off have been caused by trying to avoid elderly drivers who misjudged the amount of time it takes to turn or by not seeing me.

            My grandma rolled their truck on a gravel road a year ago this month. The speed limit on Saskatchewan grid roads is 80 km/h unless otherwise marked. It's estimated that she was going well over 100 km/h nearing the 140 mark with her cruise control set. Even I don't drive faster than 80 on gravel roads. You'd think she would have learned her lesson after that, but back in August I was riding with her in her van to the lake. We were about 3 hours late and when we got to the gravel road I watched the speedometer. 80 kph, 85 kph, 90 kph, 95 kph, 100 kph. All this while I'm thinking to myself that everything in a vehicle becomes a flying purjectile in an accident and that a Kleenex box on the back window can break your neck in a accident. All around me was two scooters, a huge piece of wood, a drill, and various other objects. Luckily we made it there safe though.
            It's amazing what speeding does isn't it?
            si vis pacem para bellum

            Comment


            • #7
              I agree. The elderly can be VERY dangerous on the road, and I think re-testing periodically makes a lot of sense.

              The flip side of the coin is that very often that driver's license is the only thing that allows someone to continue living alone. It represents their last vestige of freedom, and losing that little piece of paper can be traumatic. Especially in those areas without adequate mass transit (like - most of the country). I've had to write letters certifying that patients' should no longer drive, and in one instance in particular, she was so devastated it really tore me up inside.

              So yes, don't let those who's driving endangers others stay on the road, but let's not be too quick to yank someon'e license just because they've reached a certain age.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by countrydoc
                I agree. The elderly can be VERY dangerous on the road, and I think re-testing periodically makes a lot of sense.

                The flip side of the coin is that very often that driver's license is the only thing that allows someone to continue living alone. It represents their last vestige of freedom, and losing that little piece of paper can be traumatic. Especially in those areas without adequate mass transit (like - most of the country). I've had to write letters certifying that patients' should no longer drive, and in one instance in particular, she was so devastated it really tore me up inside.

                So yes, don't let those who's driving endangers others stay on the road, but let's not be too quick to yank someon'e license just because they've reached a certain age.
                Whats the ratio of older drivers having accidents verses younger inexperienced drivers causing accidents

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                • #9
                  Two nights ago, I had a 75 year old take a turn onto the highway from a side street, and go into the WRONG lane. He continued in the wrong lane for about a block, before drifting back over to his side of the road. I'm thinking, cool, I got me a drunk. Nope, just an old guy going to the casino at 5 in the morning.
                  "I only had a couple!"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by e-man
                    Last night my OIC was driving NORTH in the NORTHBOUND lanes of Route blah blah blah. ALl of a sudden he sees HEADLIGHTS coming at him. The road is a 3 lane each direction jersey barrier divided road. BAM, no no collission but it was about as close as you can get. Guy was about 65 years old and jsut came from a 'stop smoking ' program and said I dont know how I got on the wrong side of the road. He drove at least a mile or so on the WRONG Side of the road.
                    He gonna lose his license, he gonna lose his license.. Myself and another car 'escorted' him to the station and boy he really CANT drive.
                    Any others experience near head ons with an older, ooops, senior.???
                    i think the politically correct term is "blue hairs"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by gotthblues
                      i think the politically correct term is "blue hairs"
                      I prefer "oldsters".
                      "I only had a couple!"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by The Colonel(44)
                        Whats the ratio of older drivers having accidents verses younger inexperienced drivers causing accidents
                        Well from my experience in the insurance office I work in now, we have had about the same amount of elderly and young accidents. That might differ but that has been what I have run into.
                        si vis pacem para bellum

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by The Colonel(44)
                          Whats the ratio of older drivers having accidents verses younger inexperienced drivers causing accidents
                          If you check the CDC & various state data bases the average seems to be that drivers under age 20 cause accidents at roughly twice the rate of drivers over age 70. This includes accidents causing serious injuries. By virtue of their increased fragility the elderly die in these accidents at a rate higher than any other age group EXCEPT, again, those under age 20.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 00svtlightning
                            It's amazing what speeding does isn't it?
                            I never said that it was always safe to speed.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Spee-Dee
                              The elderly say they're not bad drivers and that most accidents don't involve them. I beg to differ. More of my close calls to having my car written off have been caused by trying to avoid elderly drivers who misjudged the amount of time it takes to turn or by not seeing me.

                              My grandma rolled their truck on a gravel road a year ago this month. The speed limit on Saskatchewan grid roads is 80 km/h unless otherwise marked. It's estimated that she was going well over 100 km/h nearing the 140 mark with her cruise control set. Even I don't drive faster than 80 on gravel roads. You'd think she would have learned her lesson after that, but back in August I was riding with her in her van to the lake. We were about 3 hours late and when we got to the gravel road I watched the speedometer. 80 kph, 85 kph, 90 kph, 95 kph, 100 kph. All this while I'm thinking to myself that everything in a vehicle becomes a flying purjectile in an accident and that a Kleenex box on the back window can break your neck in a accident. All around me was two scooters, a huge piece of wood, a drill, and various other objects. Luckily we made it there safe though.


                              So I see where you get your lead foot from. Its your grandma. I didn't think that trait passed on from generation to generation. I guess I am wrong.

                              Comment

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