Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Motorcycle Insurance

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Darkwulfe
    replied
    Sitting on a bike will not tell you everything but it is a good start. I would hope those who are looking at buying one would at least sit on it before making the purchase.

    Your best bet for your first bike is to put yourself through a two day MSF endorsed or similar beginners course. Most of them provide all safety equipment and the motorcycle. In many states you can take the course instead of the driving exam.

    Once you have your endorsement, find dealerships that offer test rides, then ride everything you can until you find what you want. If your local dealership won

    Leave a comment:


  • UA2k1GT
    replied
    good post, and like I said, he "looks" too big, didn't say he was. With handlebar adjustments and forward controls he's much more comfortable.

    But it still doesn't hurt to sit on a lot of bikes to see which you like. And most people probably DO take the way they look into consideration. We rode honda nighthawks during the MSF course which made him look like a gorilla riding a tricycle and there's no way he would want something like that.

    For most people a bike is a "novelty" vehicle, for lack of a better term. it is not for primary transportation, it's for fun on the weekends, and a lot of those same people want to "look" cool. In his case, a larger bike would have done this for him.

    Leave a comment:


  • Darkwulfe
    replied
    Originally posted by UA2k1GT
    A buddy of mine bought a Yamaha V-star 1100, its a great bike, but he's 6'1" and 185 lbs and looks too big for the bike.
    You can look "too big" for a bike and still fit well and be comfortable. Just like I can drive many smaller cars that look "too small" for me but fit just fine. The only thing that matters is how comfortable the driver is with the machine and that the size does not interfere with the control and maneuvering. I look "too big" for every sport bike out there but I can fit comfortably on most of them at 6'04". Same thing goes for someone smaller. We have a very small framed officer on motor patrol that looks

    Leave a comment:


  • lt93lover
    replied
    You need to do just what UA2k1GT said, just try some of the different models. Especially to make sure they're not too big so that you're uncomfortable. Check out the local dealers and, if you can find any, try to find a local poker run or group ride, where you can look at bikes and ask questions. Most runs end in a public place and when my ex and I rode, non-bikers always were around to look at the bikes and ask questions. The majority of people who are out there riding are friendly and will be glad to talk.
    A lot of people also recomment the Motorcycle Safety courses, especially if you're a new or inexperienced rider, but I know lots of older, experienced riders who take the course just to brush up on their skills.
    Keep us posted on what you get-Good Luck!!

    Leave a comment:


  • xray25
    replied
    MC insurance

    If you live in Iowa,Illinois or Wisconsin look for and agent that sells Iowa mutual MC ins. I sell for a number of companies depending on your age and type of bike must companies are high if you are under 25. Universal Casualty is also low rates
    Let me know how you do.

    Leave a comment:


  • UA2k1GT
    replied
    sit on some and feel what is comfortable. they're all decent.

    A buddy of mine bought a Yamaha V-star 1100, its a great bike, but he's 6'1" and 185 lbs and looks too big for the bike.

    The honda shadows are also good. I like the older Suzuki (i think ) Mauraders.

    But he's ready to sell the bike too. It's fun, but he wants to be able to carve some corners now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Thanks for the information guys... Now I'm looking for ideas on specific models, so feel free to post those. You guys have sold me on the cruiser style bike over the sport bikes. I'm not too worried about having something that goes super fast, comfort and style are more what I'm concerned about. At first glance, it just appeared that the sport bikes looked "cooler" and more fun to ride. But hey, I'm a newbie and still learning all I can about the topic! Keep the information and advice coming!

    Leave a comment:


  • RyderXS
    replied
    Originally posted by Comrade424
    If you plan on riding with a group of people you will want a 600 to make sure you can keep up. You wont need anything bigger than than unlesss you plan on going to the track. I started on a 600 and it is plenty for a first timer. I still ride a 600 as I have no need to go 180mph
    I ride with a group of sportbikers that I met through a website, chicagoriders.com, and even though I'm only on a little ninja 500, they take it into consideration and let me keep up. If I do fall behind, they wait up. The key is just in finding a good group of people to ride with who'll teach you what you've gotta know.


    And "crotch rockets" is such a stereotypical term.

    Leave a comment:


  • RyderXS
    replied
    Originally posted by duckfan
    You don't need insurance on the bike. Buy plenty of life insurance, fill out your toe tag ahead of time and make sure you sign your organ donor card.
    As long as you're not stupid about it, learn what you've gotta do, and wear the appropriate gear (jacket, gloves, helmet), it's not that bad.

    Leave a comment:


  • lt93lover
    replied
    You ought to consider a cruiser-it'll add a few more minutes to your life than if you're on a crotch rocket--But seriously, the cruisers can go just as fast if that's your thing, and you'll be more comfortable in the long run. My ex and I rode a Honda Valkyrie-wouldn't recommend it for your first street bike, but it was a great bike to ride. Any bike company has their version-Honda, Suzuki, Yamaha, Harley-all have small but powerful cruisers. Another suggestion-if you do a lot of summer riding, get a Joe Rocket Phoenix jacket. It's made of woven steel mesh and is supposed to help cut down on road rash if you happen to take a fall. Plus, it's mesh so the air blows through the holes in the summertime-much more comfrotable than leather, although leather is great for the cooler weather.
    Best of luck and keep the shiny side up whenever you get that bike!

    Leave a comment:


  • duckfan
    replied
    You don't need insurance on the bike. Buy plenty of life insurance, fill out your toe tag ahead of time and make sure you sign your organ donor card.

    Leave a comment:


  • Comrade424
    replied
    If you plan on riding with a group of people you will want a 600 to make sure you can keep up. You wont need anything bigger than than unlesss you plan on going to the track. I started on a 600 and it is plenty for a first timer. I still ride a 600 as I have no need to go 180mph

    Leave a comment:


  • RyderXS
    replied
    A 250 will get old really fast. As far as sport bikes go, first-timers should ride 500s - 650s, in my opinon.

    Leave a comment:


  • AverageJoe
    replied
    When I started looking for a bike this spring (still looking, BTW) I asked my friend about this exact topic. He had a 1988 Ninja 250 that cost him $180 a year to insure through Allstate for basic liability insurance. Per his agent, the insurance company considers the age of the rider, the age of the bike, the rider's driving record, the bike's displacement and other policies the rider holds when setting the rate. He had his car and house insured with Allstate, had a clean driving record and was between 28 and 30 years old at the time. Allstate figured he was a good risk and gave him a low rate.

    He sold the bike after one riding season. He is 5'11", 200 lbs and said the frame was just too small for him and the bike was underpowered for highway riding. He mostly rode it around town and said it was adequate for that. He advised me to get at least a 650 if doing much highway riding, and get a cruiser-style bike over a crotch rocket if I planned many long rides.

    Hope this helps,
    AvgJoe

    Leave a comment:


  • Darkwulfe
    replied
    No clue on insurance costs. Many states do not require motorcycles to be insured though. Although if you finance it, you will need insurance.

    You can get a brand new Kawasaki Ninja 250R for $3,000 or less. They seem like decent bikes for the money. I have known a few people who have owned them and thought them to be great starter bikes. I have never riden one though.

    Picture of Ninja 250R

    Leave a comment:

MR300x250 Tablet

Collapse

What's Going On

Collapse

There are currently 4508 users online. 252 members and 4256 guests.

Most users ever online was 158,966 at 05:57 AM on 01-16-2021.

Welcome Ad

Collapse
Working...
X