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  • Japan nuke workers ‘have committed themselves to die if necessary’

    The mother of one of the atomic "samurai" working to bring Japan's stricken nuclear plant under control has said her son and his colleagues expect to die as a result of their efforts. Meanwhile, there are reports that additional workers are being offered big money to dash into the radiation-drenched heart of the Fukushima Daiichi plant, perform a job, then withdraw.

    In a phone interview with Fox News, the tearful mother of a 32-year-old worker said: "My son and his colleagues have discussed it at length and they have committed themselves to die if necessary to save the nation."

    "He told me they have accepted they will all probably die from radiation sickness in the short term or cancer in the long term," the woman added.

    "They know it is impossible for them not to have been exposed to lethal doses of radiation."

    The woman did not give her name, because she said the workers had been asked by management not to speak publicly about their ordeal, in order to minimize panic.

    There are also indications that the workers aren't being provided with some crucial safety equipment. Japan's interior minister said that not all of the workers were given lead sheeting to protect themselves from the floor--which may be contaminated by radiation--while sleeping.

    "My son has been sleeping on a desk because he is afraid to lie on the floor. But they say high radioactivity is everywhere and I think this will not save him," said the mother.

    In another bleak sign, there are reports of additional workers being offered up to $5,000 a day to act as "jumpers"--so called because they "jump" into highly radioactive areas to quickly perform a task before fleeing with minimal exposure. But even at those rates, many candidates are turning the work down, Reuters reports.

    "My company offered me 200,000 yen ($2,500) per day," one subcontractor in his 30s told a reporter."Ordinarily I'd consider that a dream job, but my wife was in tears and stopped me, so I declined."

    And Ryuta Fujita, 27, told the Tokyo Shimbun newspaper he was offered $5,000 to go into Reactor 2, but likewise declined.

    "I hear that guys older than 50 are being hired at high pay," Fujita said. "But I'm still young, and radiation scares me. I don't want to work in a nuclear plant again."
    Last week two workers in Reactor 3 were taken to hospital after their feet were exposed to 170-180 millisieverts of radiation. The average dose for a worker at a nuclear plant is 50 millisieverts over 5 years.

    Because so few workers want to venture into the plant, it's proving hard for TEPCO, that company that runs it, to assess whether efforts to cool the fuel rods are working, or even to fully diagnose the problems.

    Robots are usually used for this type of work, but Fukushima's interior is so filled with debris that it's difficult for robots to operate there.
    Life is what you make of it

  • #2
    I heard about this today. I am amazed at their dedication. I am sad to say I do not think we could find such dedicated emplyees here. Sometimes people in different countries make me wish I was that good of a person.
    Budda sat in front of a wall and when he stood up he was enlightened. I sat in front of a wall and when I stood up the wall was enlightened.


    We forge our skills in the fire of our will.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Jiu-Jitsu Cop View Post
      I heard about this today. I am amazed at their dedication. I am sad to say I do not think we could find such dedicated emplyees here. Sometimes people in different countries make me wish I was that good of a person.
      I bet we could, I wouldn't put Americans down so fast.

      Comment


      • #4
        I heard of this a while ago-- when it first began, really, they knew they were being exposed to lethal doses of radiation going in to deal with it. In fact, one of the news channels interviewed a reactor employee who had evacuated for this very reason-- he knew very well it was unhealthy to stay at his post.

        No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.
        We do not all come to religion over the wandering years,
        but sooner or later we all get to meet God. -- Edward Conlon

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        • #5
          This kinda reminds me of the sailors in the real K-19 submarine who had to deal with a similar situation.
          Life is what you make of it

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          • #6
            It amazes me....the honor that the people of Japan all have. Browsing thru the pictures on MSN was humbling. They have endured three disasters within a week.

            The respect they have for the dead. All bow and say prayers for each victim. The mass graves also have dignity. In the evacuation centers, they have constructed sleep room dividers made out of cardboard. It looks like a maze but provides a bit of privacy. Everything is neat and orderly.

            The elderly seem like they have the strength and the will of people half their age. No complaints....they just patiently wait. They were happy to have a tent with a soaking tub. One man said...he wish he could have bathe his parents before they were buried.

            And the dogs.....the one that sat and guarded his injuried friend until help arrived. Speaking of....did you see the dog that was found today on the roof of a house in the ocean? Adrift for 21 days....he was rescued! YAY!!


            Makes me think back to Katrina and how some of people acted....especially at the Superdome......what pigs!
            This profession is not for people looking for positive reinforcement from the public. Very often it can be a thankless job and you can't desire accolades, because those are not usually forthcoming. Just do your job to the best of your ability and live with the decisions you've made.

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            • #7
              +1

              It's humbling to see and hear of the patience and honor seen time and time again from the people of Japan.
              Originally posted by JasperST
              "The fail is strong with this one."


              Originally posted by mdrep
              It's not sporting old chap. Like shooting fish in a barrel. You may only take a shot at a poser or troll if they are running and you are properly licensed.

              What do you think we are, a bunch of barbarians?

              Comment


              • #8
                This was a tear jerker:

                http://photoblog.msnbc.msn.com/_news...urvivor-writes
                This profession is not for people looking for positive reinforcement from the public. Very often it can be a thankless job and you can't desire accolades, because those are not usually forthcoming. Just do your job to the best of your ability and live with the decisions you've made.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by deputy x 2 View Post
                  That is so sad! At least she still has her grandmother.
                  Originally posted by JasperST
                  "The fail is strong with this one."


                  Originally posted by mdrep
                  It's not sporting old chap. Like shooting fish in a barrel. You may only take a shot at a poser or troll if they are running and you are properly licensed.

                  What do you think we are, a bunch of barbarians?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm not surprised!...Japanese people are some of the best people in the world, humble and very smart...They fixed a road that was destroyed in 6 days...The small things are being done or are already done...Once they take care of the power plant things will start to run a lot more smoothly...


                    Katrina was an all around embarrassment!...Japan has still been getting hit though, they've had a few more tsunami warning and earthquake and aftershock...God bless them, I hope they get the power plant situation taken care of soon...
                    sigpic

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jiu-Jitsu Cop View Post
                      I heard about this today. I am amazed at their dedication. I am sad to say I do not think we could find such dedicated emplyees here. Sometimes people in different countries make me wish I was that good of a person.
                      Not even yourself? What about all the police and military personel on this forum? Not to mention the real Americans who exist out there.
                      Been chatting to a girl online. She's funny, sexy and flirty. Now she tells me she is an undercover cop! How cool is that at her age!?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        ^^^^ Hmmm interesting question. I can not speak for others here but in my case I think it would be easier to respond to a call of an active shooter and give my life then it would be to go into somthing that I know I am going to die. With the shooter I would go into it believing I would survive. With a situation where they tell me 100% for sure I will die a painful death......well I may be code 7 during that briefing.
                        Budda sat in front of a wall and when he stood up he was enlightened. I sat in front of a wall and when I stood up the wall was enlightened.


                        We forge our skills in the fire of our will.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by FromOhio View Post
                          Not even yourself? What about all the police and military personel on this forum? Not to mention the real Americans who exist out there.
                          You have to consider though, not every soldier, LEO/EMT, etc. has the skill to be sent into a high-tech nuclear reactor and perform specific tasks that most likely require years of schooling and training. It was clear in events like 9/11 that many people were willing to sacrafice their safety/lives, but that was something that they knew they could do something about and help people with. Anyone that is not trained and educated for nuclear maintenance, etc. I think would have a tougher time commiting (if they were even allowed) to going into a nuclear reactor and performing tasks that they have no idea how to do.

                          With that said, I hope Japan keeps up the great efforts. Those people are so selfless and united that it is just ridiculous when you compare some parts of the world, including us. I wish I had the money and time to go over there and help them out with anything - it would be humbling and would definitely make you appreciate everything in your life.

                          OP - could I get the link to that article?
                          Last edited by jjbledsoe; 04-03-2011, 02:13 PM.
                          Pursuing the dream.


                          Awaiting the start of Academy... April 28th.

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