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Retired police officer gravely injured by bulldog he had rescued

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  • Retired police officer gravely injured by bulldog he had rescued

    Retired police officer gravely injured by bulldog he had rescued

    StarTribune
    By CHAO XIONG
    Published: Today

    Amy Klinefelter was sitting down to a night on the computer and some TV in her Woodbury home last Sunday evening when thumps emanating from her basement caught her off guard. Her roommate, Jim Stewart, was downstairs with his American bulldog, watching TV as usual.

    When Klinefelter went to investigate, she found the 120-pound dog, Igor, standing over a bloodied, barely conscious Stewart, 53. The retired police officer was lying on his side, the skin of his face torn off and one eyelid ripped apart. An ear had been severed.

    His face was just, I just, I mean, just gone, Klinefelter said Friday. Just blood everywhere.

    Igor stood there looking back at Klinefelter, seemingly in shock himself, she said. He didn't react aggressively when she grabbed his harness and dragged him down the hall and into the garage, where she locked him up. In fact, Klinefelter said, the dog hadn't shown any aggression or warning signs in the five months it had lived with them and Klinefelter's cat and yellow lab, Ali.

    Klinefelter called 911 and Stewart was rushed to Regions Hospital in St. Paul, where he is listed in good condition.

    Stewart adopted 2-year-old Igor this June after his 8-year-old American bulldog, Reggie, died of cancer in May. Igor came via an American bulldog rescue group that picked him up in Texas and placed him in a foster home in the Twin Cities. Klinefelter said she doesn't remember the group's name, although she remembers it being legitimate and thorough, running a background check on Stewart and visiting Klinefelter's townhouse to ensure that Igor was going to a good home.

    [Stewart] was so happy, she said. He loves Igor. He was always with him, always talking to him, walking him.

    Igor wrestled and slept with Klinefelter's dog, Ali. He didn't come with any special warnings or behavioral issues, Klinefelter said, adding that she is not familiar with his history.

    The night of the attack, she said she didn't hear any yelling, barking or growling, just loud thumps like a heavy object hitting the wall. She's still puzzled about why it happened.

    It's just so ... out of character for the dog, she said.

    Stewart, who retired from the Hudson, Wis., Police Department after 24 years and who now works as a security guard at the St. Paul Hotel, underwent hours of surgery and was sedated for a few days. He has regained consciousness off and on, Klinefelter said, and was able to walk a little on Friday. He's been informed about the attack, but doesn't remember it.

    He granted permission for Igor to be euthanized Thursday.

    It's unclear when he'll be discharged from the hospital, or how many more reconstructive surgeries he will require.

    It sounds like it will be a long road, Klinefelter said.

    Chao Xiong 612-673-4391
    Sleep well. There are people out there willing to die tonight so that you can wake up safe tomorrow.

  • #2
    Weird. My dogs play with an American Bulldog mix and he's quite friendly. But you never know about the history, something went wrong somewhere obviously. I hope he will recover. I guess they'll never know what set the dog off.

    Comment


    • #3
      That's really too bad
      'Evil always wins when Good does nothing'-Anonymous

      Comment


      • #4
        That story doesn't make sense to me on several points...It just doesn’t sound like how dogs act, especially bulldogs.
        "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit" - Aristotle

        Comment


        • #5
          Sometimes you just cant explain animals and what sets them off.....especially a rescue dog whose background you're not entirely sure about.......
          'Evil always wins when Good does nothing'-Anonymous

          Comment


          • #6
            Thats true....but it still seems weird.

            For instance, the dog just... standing there. I don't know that I've ever heard of a bulldog biting it's owner then just standing there. I've been bit by one of our bulldogs when I was younger. They KNOW they've done something wrong and usually slink away.

            But with it being a rescue dog... I wish the owner could have remembered what happened.
            "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit" - Aristotle

            Comment


            • #7
              That's just sick! Like Kitty says, you just never know what's going on in that little half a peach sized brain of theirs. One time my 100 pound yellow lab turned on me and thought I was going to back down because he came at me full on ****ed growling and the hair on his back was up, he ended up airborne flying off the deck for about 8 feet and beat up a tad, never did it again...

              Comment


              • #8
                North Platte, NE more than a few yrs ago. A labrador playing in a city park decided to tear up a little girl, 8 if I remember right, her older brother about 10 stepped in and got tore up also. When police arrived the dog just hopped in the cruiser ready to go for a ride like nothing had happend.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I hear these stories and have to wonder about them. Dogs do things for a reason. While these attacks are rare, it doesn't make them any less frightening.

                  I know my dogs very well, you could beat my pit mix to death and she wouldn't even growl at you. There are a lot of people that seem to have no clue. I've seen them at the dog park with their dog getting way too aggressive and they just stand there mesmerized.

                  I see it like gun ownership, you must be in control, know your weapon and be responsible.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JasperST View Post
                    I hear these stories and have to wonder about them. Dogs do things for a reason. While these attacks are rare, it doesn't make them any less frightening.

                    I know my dogs very well, you could beat my pit mix to death and she wouldn't even growl at you. There are a lot of people that seem to have no clue. I've seen them at the dog park with their dog getting way too aggressive and they just stand there mesmerized.

                    I see it like gun ownership, you must be in control, know your weapon and be responsible.
                    In this case the man apparently was just watching TV. Some dogs are time bombs just like people...

                    I once responded to a call where pit bull mauled someone only to find a seemingly happy and cooperatve dog upon my arrival.
                    Disclaimer: The writer does not represent any organization, employer, entity or other individual. The first amendment protected views/commentary/opinions/satire expressed are those only of the writer. In the case of a sarcastic, facetious, nonsensical, stirring-the-pot, controversial or devil's advocate-type post, the views expressed may not even reflect those of the writer.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JasperST View Post
                      I hear these stories and have to wonder about them. Dogs do things for a reason. While these attacks are rare, it doesn't make them any less frightening.

                      I know my dogs very well, you could beat my pit mix to death and she wouldn't even growl at you. There are a lot of people that seem to have no clue. I've seen them at the dog park with their dog getting way too aggressive and they just stand there mesmerized.

                      I see it like gun ownership, you must be in control, know your weapon and be responsible.
                      My gun will not fire unless I pull the trigger. Can't say the same for dogs.
                      summer - winter - work

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        We have grapefruit sized brains and we have psychos to.
                        We have to remember that these are dogs. Dogs are wild, we made them domestic. That primal drive is in all of them and the more we overbreed them the more they lose control of their instincts.

                        Its unwritten policy for us that if we show up to a call and there's a lose bulldog around we keep it at gunpoint or taser point until the owner chains it up.
                        Due to the Juvenile bickering and annoying trolling committed by members of this forum I have started an igore list. If your name is listed below I can't see you.

                        CityCopDC, Fire Moose, Carbonfiberfoot, Damiansolomon

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by leesrt View Post
                          We have grapefruit sized brains and we have psychos to.
                          We have to remember that these are dogs. Dogs are wild, we made them domestic. That primal drive is in all of them and the more we overbreed them the more they lose control of their instincts.

                          Its unwritten policy for us that if we show up to a call and there's a lose bulldog around we keep it at gunpoint or taser point until the owner chains it up.
                          Does this apply to any of the other so called "dangerous" breeds Leesrt like pits, dobies,shepherds and the like?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JLee View Post
                            My gun will not fire unless I pull the trigger. Can't say the same for dogs.
                            I can say that about mine, but obviously an unknown dog should be considered a potential threat.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I just read the story. While it's a severe mauling, he's not 'gravely' injured. Headline's a bit misleading. With the owner's permission, they put the dog down. How sad all way around.

                              Like Hineline's story, you have to put these mutts in their place should they act up. Maintain your 'alpha' status. My boxer/chow will get a 'tude' once in awhile. Good right cross to his hind parts takes care of it. Followed shortly thereafter with a big hug and treat. Come to think of it...maybe he does that on purpose.

                              Speedy recovery for the retired owner. He's hurting both physically and emotionally for sure.
                              sigpic
                              Our houses are protected by the good Lord and a gun.
                              And you might meet 'em both if you show up here not welcome son.

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