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  • just joe
    replied
    My wife's OB won't let her take anything that can cross the placenta. I assume this med can cross the placenta, correct?

    Leave a comment:


  • rubyrose
    replied
    Incidentally, when my daughter was pg with her first, had severe back pain from a whiplash injury she got broadsided by someone running a red light. She did not take any pain medications for it. She managed by using a chiropractor who adapted the treatments to her pregnancy.

    There are many ways of addressing back pain. Hope you talk to that doc soon.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tinga
    replied
    Back pain plagued me throughout pregnancy.All the weight in front strained my muscles in my back. These work. It takes most of the weight off and helps support your back.

    http://www.fitmaternity.com/maternit...hes/ai003.html

    Also, body pillows are your best friend.

    http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...uct_id=2128727 <---- Super comfy, although you need a rather large bed..

    Leave a comment:


  • Sharp
    replied
    Oxycodone for back pain seems awful extreme, but Im a man, so I have never been, and never will be, pregnant.

    What other options are there? What have you already tried?

    Im not in your position, so I do not know how severe the pain is, but I would try to find other methods of relieving the pain. Stretches, massages, and some topical treatments (if approved for pregnant women), as well as simply changing your lifestyle can help.

    I found this link, seems like there are some good ideas on here.

    Leave a comment:


  • willowdared
    replied
    What is causing the back-pain, and what other options have you tried?

    Also, if you choose to medicate, you should try the lowest dose possible first, and see what is bearable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Monty Ealerman
    replied
    Hi Mom,

    I agree with hxd completely, and with all the other prior posters, too.

    You don't have to be an embyrologist to know you don't want your kid to be born a dope addict.

    Opiates and opioids cross the placenta, and will cause the developing infant to adjust its neural system growth in accomodation of the presence of opioids. It will not develop as much endorphin-enkaphalin production capability, and will increase its opioid processing capability, and that will happen at the expense of the correct production of other neural and somatic systems. Its brain and its bodily nervous systems will be less correctly developed, it will be less able to handle pain, it will be more susceptible to future narcotic addiction, the efferent and afferent nervous system connections to muscle fibers will be less complete and correct, and there will be a greater risk of other prenatally-induced developmental disorders.

    Maybe you could go get some Vorwerk capsicum pepper pads, and have your midwife find you a massage therapist instead of giving you narcotics, and learn and try some exercises you can do to alleviate back pain during pregnancy.

    When you see your kid thriving, you can then smile to yourself about the pain you're having to deal with now. God bless you and yours, and may your baby be born healthy and have a great life.

    Regards,

    Monty

    Leave a comment:


  • Jellybean400
    replied
    Originally posted by rubyrose View Post
    A certified midwife can prescribe most medications, same as a certified nurse practitioner and a certified physician's assistant.
    OK, well her first line she wrote said "army midwife/drs." - i guess i'm confused.

    Leave a comment:


  • rubyrose
    replied
    A certified midwife can prescribe most medications, same as a certified nurse practitioner and a certified physician's assistant.

    Originally posted by Jellybean400 View Post
    Someone wrote a prescription for them... didnt that have to be a physician?

    Leave a comment:


  • rubyrose
    replied
    A midwife can be just as good and sometimes better than a medical doctor. My daughter as a lay midwife taught her OB/GYN husband a thing or two and he transformed his practice as a result.

    However, this midwife should be discussing the drug with you in depth. She shouldn't just hand you an prescription and say take it. No good doc or midwife does that.

    Leave a comment:


  • David Hineline
    replied
    I don't know what any of this is. mid-wife (army mid-wife/dr.s)

    My baby desirved a medical doctor who did nothing but babies.

    I would talk with one of those about the drug, then most likely reccomend to my wife that she just rode the pain out rather than take any drug chance with a baby.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jellybean400
    replied
    Someone wrote a prescription for them... didnt that have to be a physician?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mrs. Hoppes
    replied
    Good point about the pregnancy causing the pain. There are some simple yoga moves to help stretch the back and move the baby.

    One is called cat/cow and the other is child's pose.

    Leave a comment:


  • rubyrose
    replied
    I agree with the others that you need to talk it over with your physician.

    I take 7.5/500 mg Perc for my back pain 4xday because the Vicodin I had (to which I did not become addicted, btw) could not touch the pain. However, there are days I don't need that much so I don't take it, which indicates to me I'm not addicted.

    However, I'm not pregnant (unless there's a star in the East).

    You didn't say how intense the back pain is. There are a number of non-pharmaceutical ways to deal with back pain, including massage and physical therapy (which would have to be adapted to your pregnancy).

    Chances are you doc will ask you to weigh the pain you are experiencing against the risk. If you are unable to sleep at night because of the pain, your exhaustion from sleep deprivation could also hurt the baby.

    Is the back pain from the pregnancy or some other source? If it's from the pregnancy a Physical Therapist can probably help you out. I'm in PT right now for my spinal stenosis and it is definitely helping -- most of it is oriented toward strengthening my back. Your pregnancy also would exacerbate any other back pain issues you may have.

    Did your midwife just prescribe without talking with you about alternatives to medication?
    Last edited by rubyrose; 09-07-2008, 09:20 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • texaschickeee
    replied
    http://www.thelaboroflove.com/articl...ing-pregnancy/
    supports Ms. hopples no study statements.


    **Vicodin

    Generic Name: acetaminophen and hydrocodone (a SEET a MIN oh fen and hye droe KOE done)
    Brand Names: Anexsia, Dolorex Forte, Hycet, Liquicet, Lorcet, Maxidone, Norco, Polygesic, Stagesic, Vicodin, Xodol, Zydone
    What is Vicodin?

    Feedback for Vicodin
    User Comments Avg User Rating
    11 Comments
    8.2 Rate it!

    Vicodin is a tablet containing a combination of acetaminophen and hydrocodone. Hydrocodone is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers.

    Acetaminophen is a less potent pain reliever that increases the effects of hydrocodone.

    Vicodin is used to relieve moderate to severe pain.

    Vicodin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.
    Important information about Vicodin

    If you are prescribed Vicodin tell your doctor if you drink more than three alcoholic beverages per day or if you have ever had alcoholic liver disease (cirrhosis). You may not be able to take medication that contains acetaminophen.
    Hydrocodone may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it. Vicodin can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

    Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain.
    Before taking Vicodin
    Do not use Vicodin if you are allergic to acetaminophen (Tylenol) or hydrocodone. Hydrocodone may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Vicodin should never be given to another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.

    Before using Vicodin, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

    *

    asthma, COPD, sleep apnea, or other breathing disorders;
    * liver or kidney disease;
    *

    a history of head injury or brain tumor;
    *

    low blood pressure;
    *

    a stomach or intestinal disorder;
    *

    underactive thyroid;
    *

    Addison's disease or other adrenal gland disorder;
    *

    curvature of the spine;
    *

    mental illness; or
    *

    a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

    Tell your doctor if you drink more than three alcoholic beverages per day or if you have ever had alcoholic liver disease (cirrhosis). You may not be able to take medication that contains acetaminophen.
    FDA pregnancy category C. Vicodin may be harmful to an unborn baby, and could cause breathing problems or addiction/withdrawal symptoms in a newborn. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Vicodin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

    http://www.drugs.com/vicodin.html
    I'm with hxd- talk to your doctor,
    this is the INTERNET, your gonna get support statements before you get the truth.

    Leave a comment:


  • hxd
    replied
    This is an issue that MUST be discussed with an OB/GYN and/or family physician sooner rather than later.

    I can speak ONLY in general terms, and NOT to your specific case.

    There are a couple of potential issues to consider:

    (1) Addiction to the medication by the unborn child. Oxycodone IS an opiate. It IS a narcotic. And it IS addictive. Any long-term regular use of the medication, no matter how little, has the potential to result in the child being born addicted to the medication.

    (2) Regular narcotic use (legal or otherwise) tends to stunt the grown of the respiratory system during the development of the unborn child. Survival of children born with respiratory issues is "iffy" at best.

    Oxycodone has been classified by the US FDA as Pregnancy Category C drug, which must bear the warning: "Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use of the drug in pregnant women despite potential risks."

    Leave a comment:

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