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  • Things I Need

    Hello,
    So I was accepted to the academy and I was wondering what kinds of things do you guy recommend me to get? Also if you guys have any tips on how to survive the academy that would be awesome too. Thank you and have a good one!

  • #2
    I've been to more academies than I wish to admit. They all provided everything needed, except for running shoes and jock straps.

    The exception was the self-funded one. But they were clear about what to bring.

    Ratatatat's tips for survival:

    There's always one person who already knows everything, has done everything, and won't shut up. Don't be *that guy*.

    The first few weeks are the 'tear down' part. The last few weeks are the 'build up' part.

    Don't take criticism personally.

    Always be prepared during inspection to answer questions from previous day topics, like "What is the definition of 'probable cause'" (Answer: When the facts and circumstances would cause a reasonable officer to believe a crime was committed and the suspect committed it.)

    Don't get in a romantic relationship with a classmate. This has happened in every class I've been in, and it never ended well for those involved.

    Be careful what you say and do when away from the instructors. The walls have eyes and ears.

    Mostly, be a sponge. Listen and learn and have an open mindset.



    I used to be a banker but I lost interest.

    -Steven Wright

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Ratatatat View Post
      I've been to more academies than I wish to admit. They all provided everything needed, except for running shoes and jock straps.

      The exception was the self-funded one. But they were clear about what to bring.

      Ratatatat's tips for survival:

      There's always one person who already knows everything, has done everything, and won't shut up. Don't be *that guy*.

      The first few weeks are the 'tear down' part. The last few weeks are the 'build up' part.

      Don't take criticism personally.

      Always be prepared during inspection to answer questions from previous day topics, like "What is the definition of 'probable cause'" (Answer: When the facts and circumstances would cause a reasonable officer to believe a crime was committed and the suspect committed it.)

      Don't get in a romantic relationship with a classmate. This has happened in every class I've been in, and it never ended well for those involved.

      Be careful what you say and do when away from the instructors. The walls have eyes and ears.

      Mostly, be a sponge. Listen and learn and have an open mindset.


      Sweet tahnks for the tips i'll keep those in mind and im actually going in as a self sponsored student.

      Comment


      • #4
        Did they not give you a list?

        Add a tube of Icy Hot to it....

        One more tip: dedicate an hour (at least) every evening to review/study the classroom material. Get some 3x5 index cards and write question one side/answer on the other side. Get together a little study group of 2-3 other students and quiz each other before exams.
        I used to be a banker but I lost interest.

        -Steven Wright

        Comment


        • #5
          61OuLpQAsOL._SL1500_.jpg

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ratatatat View Post
            Did they not give you a list?

            Add a tube of Icy Hot to it....

            One more tip: dedicate an hour (at least) every evening to review/study the classroom material. Get some 3x5 index cards and write question one side/answer on the other side. Get together a little study group of 2-3 other students and quiz each other before exams.
            Yea ill get a study group together when the academy starts that sounds like a really good idea. I also got a list but it lists the like the base stuff not the extras like a back brace for the duty belt and stuff.

            Comment


            • #7
              Do they even allow "extras" like a back brace?

              Comment


              • Winter94
                Winter94 commented
                Editing a comment
                Not sure thats something I ahve to ask because I do already have a "BackUpBrace" on my belt that was used for TC.

            • #8
              When OC day comes, don't try to use milk or anything other than water to clear your eyes out. Later that night, use very generous amounts of Dawn dish soap to wash your body off slowly. Use a bucket rather than the shower head to slowly rinse exposed areas. Remember gravity pulls water downwards and be cognizant of parts of your body that might really not feel good to get OC on. Have a significant other help you as you go, if possible. I managed to clean up/shower the night after class with only mild secondary reactivation on one ear.

              Comment


              • Winter94
                Winter94 commented
                Editing a comment
                OC day sounds like a good story... I'll keep these tips in mind thank you!

            • #9
              ^OC day....good times lol. We did that mid day and still had to show up to class like nothing ever happened. It seemed like every 20 min someone would have a secondary reaction and have to run out of class haha. Definitely invest in the dawn dish soap (when you get to that point) and try to have someone guide you towards the showers. We rotated and helped each other through it. It didn't help that the academy had like 7 working showers for almost 800 hundred people in the building at the time.

              Back on topic: My advice is don't give up or quit! Having good friendships and teamwork throughout will get you through anything I really mean it. There are trying times...good days, bad days etc but it's designed for people to pass granted you show that you're willing to put in the effort to adapt and overcome anything and everything they throw at you. We ran and worked out a lot and we had to do it outside on days with negative temps. We showed up 2 days in a row where the actual temp was -27 and with the windchill -40. It was an old building and the classroom windows were solid sheets of ice and we were wearing our coats haha. Anyway, It will come down to time management, eating right, sleeping right and getting your mind in the right place so to speak. The academy is just a phase (mine was literally 30 weeks long so it felt like forever) but it was worth it. Good luck to you!

              Comment


              • southpaw1
                southpaw1 commented
                Editing a comment
                NW121 Oh that sucks man. They at least afforded us that courtesy. On the flip side though, we destroyed the locker room...our gym sweats and shoes littered the path to the showers hahahaha. Good times!

              • Winter94
                Winter94 commented
                Editing a comment
                Will do thank you for both the tip and story haha.

              • southpaw1
                southpaw1 commented
                Editing a comment
                Winter94 yeah no problem!

              • DeaconSteve
                DeaconSteve commented
                Editing a comment
                Use as cool of water in the shower as you can stand, as warmer water will open your skin's pores that some of the OC can get in and remain for a while.

            • #10
              When I started out in 1972 individual officers purchased everything (uniforms, firearms, leather gear, handcuffs, baton, flashlights, shoes, you name it). Generally an approved list of products and suppliers. A very few departments issued some gear, but that was not the norm. A few departments offered a uniform & equipment allowance (usually about half what it cost to outfit a new cop) and some provided a small monthly allowance for things like flashlight batteries, ammo for duty and range qualifications, etc.

              Police supply companies printed catalogs (just like Sears & Wards) and some offered deferred payment plans (with department approved payroll deductions). The catalogs were always on the counters of the report room and shift commander's office.

              With my department we could purchase our side arms as "tax-free individual officer purchases" that eliminated the 11% federal excise tax on sporting goods, and many of us pooled our money to purchase tax-free ammo in case lots to save money. A brand new S&W Model 10 Military & Police revolver was about $90 retail, or $72 for an authorized LE sale delivered to the department for the individual officer. A new S&W Model 19 .357 magnum revolver was about $149 retail, about $120 LE authorized sale price. The police supply companies usually provided one year payment plans, and some were interest-free.

              Believe me on this, no young cop in those days had a VISA or MasterCard. Some of us had oil company gasoline charge cards, but the days of easy individual credit were not here then. Our city employees credit union offered modest loans for members, again with payroll deduction for the payments.

              My starting salary in 1972 was $657 per month. After federal & state income taxes, retirement fund, and Blue Cross-Blue Shield took their cuts my take-home pay was $192 every other Friday. My house payment was $182 per month and I had two kids to feed. No overtime pay (until about 1974 anyway). Most of us had a second part-time job or side business (locksmiths, roofing contractors, you name it; I collected bad checks for a couple of grocery store chains for several years, with the $20 bad check fee going in my pocket and the store owners happy to get their money for the bounced checks).

              Different times.

              Comment


              • southpaw1
                southpaw1 commented
                Editing a comment
                Chicago PD makes us buy our own stuff with the exception of a ballistic vest that we get fitted for and issued. We get loans through the Chicago Patrolmen's Credit Union and spend about $6-8k in the the academy. That is average. We do get uniform allowances but it doesn't put a dent in the initial expenses

            • #11
              If they tell you no talking then keep your mouthes shut! Every military and civilian training I went through there were always some [email protected] that couldn't comprehend what shut up meant.

              Comment


              • Aidokea
                Aidokea commented
                Editing a comment
                The two most important words in law enforcement, are "shut" and "up".

            • #12
              Originally posted by retired1995 View Post
              When I started out in 1972 individual officers purchased everything (uniforms, firearms, leather gear, handcuffs, baton, flashlights, shoes, you name it). Generally an approved list of products and suppliers. A very few departments issued some gear, but that was not the norm. A few departments offered a uniform & equipment allowance (usually about half what it cost to outfit a new cop) and some provided a small monthly allowance for things like flashlight batteries, ammo for duty and range qualifications, etc.

              Police supply companies printed catalogs (just like Sears & Wards) and some offered deferred payment plans (with department approved payroll deductions). The catalogs were always on the counters of the report room and shift commander's office.

              With my department we could purchase our side arms as "tax-free individual officer purchases" that eliminated the 11% federal excise tax on sporting goods, and many of us pooled our money to purchase tax-free ammo in case lots to save money. A brand new S&W Model 10 Military & Police revolver was about $90 retail, or $72 for an authorized LE sale delivered to the department for the individual officer. A new S&W Model 19 .357 magnum revolver was about $149 retail, about $120 LE authorized sale price. The police supply companies usually provided one year payment plans, and some were interest-free.

              Believe me on this, no young cop in those days had a VISA or MasterCard. Some of us had oil company gasoline charge cards, but the days of easy individual credit were not here then. Our city employees credit union offered modest loans for members, again with payroll deduction for the payments.

              My starting salary in 1972 was $657 per month. After federal & state income taxes, retirement fund, and Blue Cross-Blue Shield took their cuts my take-home pay was $192 every other Friday. My house payment was $182 per month and I had two kids to feed. No overtime pay (until about 1974 anyway). Most of us had a second part-time job or side business (locksmiths, roofing contractors, you name it; I collected bad checks for a couple of grocery store chains for several years, with the $20 bad check fee going in my pocket and the store owners happy to get their money for the bounced checks).

              Different times.
              This is a perfect time capsule of how things were 'back in the day, even before my era....

              I tell the kids what it was like to combat reload a revolver on a timed course of fire, or that one day in 1992 when we got a 'bee-bop' machine, where you'd dial a phone number and the machine would go bee-bop, then you could write a message to someone at [email protected]~76%$)mgRt:\>$11+~\>. Or how if you wanted a job you read the help wanted section of a newspaper or went to the nearest federal building and looked at the green sheets. Or how cool it was to get bag phones in our cars. I tell them this stuff all the time and they look at me like I just grew a third eyeball. They will never know the struggle...
              I used to be a banker but I lost interest.

              -Steven Wright

              Comment


              • Aidokea
                Aidokea commented
                Editing a comment
                I got the Glock in 1991, and cell phones and MDTs not long after.

            • #13
              Speed loaders for .38 Plus P’s,....I’ve still got mine tucked away somewhere, lol.

              Comment


              • #14
                Originally posted by NolaT View Post
                Speed loaders for .38 Plus P’s,....I’ve still got mine tucked away somewhere, lol.
                I used those and had a belt holder too. Half the rounds would fall in the dirt while I fumbled to combat reload.

                Again, kids these days will never know the struggle.....


                Image result for .357 belt
                I used to be a banker but I lost interest.

                -Steven Wright

                Comment


                • #15
                  Speed loaders were fine as long as you were fully inserted before twisting!

                  Comment

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