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  • Suggestions or examples of what you say to people?

    I am a cadet at a state patrol academy and will graduate in three months. I am having issues knowing how to communicate and talk to people in scenarios that we are given (i.e. use of force, deadly force, traffic stops and domestics) of course this is the bread and butter of what officer do on a daily basis, which is why I am looking for suggestions on how people effectively talk to people? I understand that these situations are fluid and you never know what will happen, I guess I am just looking for a little help on the verbiage someone might say to start a contact with someone after you introduce yourself and your department. I think knowing how to communicate is the single most important factor that I need to master and know that it will come with experience, but any help with knowing how other officers approach and contact people I think would be very beneficial. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    Knowledge is best used to apply action, not to disrupt or corrupt action.

  • #2
    Your Traing Staff should be helping you. Did you ask them? This is why I advocate all cop wanna-bes to take an acting or speech class.
    Now go home and get your shine box!

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    • #3
      It's tough because every department, and TYPE of department, is different and each situation is different.

      "Be polite, be professional, have a plan to kill everyone you meet" works generally.
      "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

      "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tanksoldier View Post
        It's tough because every department, and TYPE of department, is different and each situation is different.

        "Be polite, be professional, have a plan to kill everyone you meet" works generally.
        It does indeed. One of my favorite quotes.

        To the poster: This is just something that will come with practice. Learn from comments given by the instructors.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
          Your Traing Staff should be helping you. Did you ask them? This is why I advocate all cop wanna-bes to take an acting or speech class.
          I did in fact ask my training officers, and they suggested look into how to approach the situation and I also got some great advise. I still have problem trying to have a general sense of what clarifying questions to ask in any stressful situation to get responses that would be beneficial to getting to the bottom of the problem within the situation. Does anyone have any general clarifying question examples they think they could provide?
          Knowledge is best used to apply action, not to disrupt or corrupt action.

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          • #6
            You learn THAT in the academy. I can't fathom how you don't understand this nor how your TOs can't get that across to you.
            Now go home and get your shine box!

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            • #7
              This might be a personal issue, not a training issue... You are going to really have to step it up if you want to pass and be successful. Learn and practice Verbal Judo and De-escalation. Talk to yourself in the mirror, practice on family members. You will not be a successful cop if you cannot communicate. Talk to someone like a person, don't try to be all big and bad. When the time comes, know how to effectively use your command presence.
              The sheep generally do not like the sheepdog. He looks a lot like the wolf. He has fangs and the capacity for violence. The difference, though, is that the sheepdog must not, cannot and will not ever harm the sheep. Any sheepdog who intentionally harms the lowliest little lamb will be punished and removed.

              I Am the Sheepdog.


              "And maybe just remind the few, if ill of us they speak,
              that we are all that stands between
              the monsters and the weak." - Michael Marks


              sigpic

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              • #8
                Originally posted by packer083 View Post
                I am a cadet at a state patrol academy and will graduate in three months. I am having issues knowing how to communicate and talk to people in scenarios that we are given (i.e. use of force, deadly force, traffic stops and domestics) of course this is the bread and butter of what officer do on a daily basis, which is why I am looking for suggestions on how people effectively talk to people? I understand that these situations are fluid and you never know what will happen, I guess I am just looking for a little help on the verbiage someone might say to start a contact with someone after you introduce yourself and your department. I think knowing how to communicate is the single most important factor that I need to master and know that it will come with experience, but any help with knowing how other officers approach and contact people I think would be very beneficial. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
                That is what FTO is for................

                Your Field Training Officer will help you to learn how to deal with all sorts of people.

                Academy training is only the START of your learning curve. The most of the work related details will be taught to you in those first 6 months of being a road cop. The academy teaches THEORY ..........FTO teaches how it really works in a practical setting.

                Have patience and remember during FTO you need to remember you have 2 eyes, 2 ears and only ONE mouth for a reason
                Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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                • #9
                  Keep it simple and to the point. Be firm but courteous. Don't patronise or condescend to people. This stuff just comes through practice. As you gain more confidence in your role people become easier to talk to.

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                  • #10
                    I still have problem trying to have a general sense of what clarifying questions to ask in any stressful situation to get responses that would be beneficial to getting to the bottom of the problem within the situation. Does anyone have any general clarifying question examples they think they could provide?
                    That depends on the problem and the situation. You're going to be a trooper, so:

                    Plate doesn't come back to that color vehicle? Plate doesn't come back to that make/model? Plate doesn't come back to that VIN?

                    Any of those 3 but the driver has what looks like proper registration?

                    Could be all kinds of problems, anything from a crime being committed to an honest mistake to a clerical error.

                    I've had stolen plates. I've had a guy who put his plates on his wife's car and vice versa by mistake. I've had a clerical error where the VIN was off by one digit, so it came back to a different vehicle.

                    So think about it. What information are you trying to find out? How do you find out what you need to know to resolve the situation? What questions would you ask? What do you ask DISPATCH do do?

                    There's no set series of questions... it depends. So you see something you know is wrong, but you don't know what the real problem IS yet. So figure that out, then figure out how it happened and if it's a crime... and if it IS a crime, is it worth citing, summoning or arresting for or was it an honest mistake and you let the guy fix it and give a warning.
                    Last edited by tanksoldier; 02-03-2017, 10:31 PM.
                    "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                    "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Who, what, when, where, why and how. Who are you? What happened? What are/were you doing? etc...

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                      • #12
                        Regardless of what cccsd says, you DON'T always learn this in the academy. Plus when you know it's a training scenario and that an instructor is watching you, it's much harder.
                        Youll learn to talk with people much better when you start doing it for real. Over and over and over.

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                        • #13
                          Take your time formulating your questions and answers.

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                          • #14
                            Clarifying questions...

                            "He hit me."

                            Where? With what? How many times? Did you hit hit back? Who started the physical altercation? What are your injuries?

                            Where did he go? On foot or in a vehicle? What type of vehicle? What direction?

                            Who. What. When. Where. Why. How. I learned this in Elementary School English class.


                            They are teaching you this, you just don't get it.

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                            • #15
                              I keep a form with questions for my Q&A sessions so I don't have to remember the good ones
                              Former Police Officer (Injured LOD)
                              USAF VETERAN 2004-2012
                              "The sheep pretend the wolf will never come, but the sheepdog lives for that day."-LTC Grossman
                              Emergency Services Dispatcher, APG MD

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