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  • #16
    I resigned the academy in week 10 of 26. The hardest decision of my life. I entered the academy lacking the proper conditioning for the academy, and it got worse from there. Trying to make up for lost time only created injuries and aggravated old ones, to the point I just couldn't physically do it anymore. I lost weight in the academy, and my running improved a little, but I grew weak and lost strength. I kept falling behind on runs and the rest of the class was punished for it. The red man fight was the straw that broke the camel's back, as I failed miserably and it showed me that I couldn't even defend myself. They gave me the choice to resign on good terms and come back after getting it together physically, catch up my physical conditioning overnight, or be fired.

    Over a year later, the stigma of being a quitter hangs over my head. I hate myself for it. Part of me wishes I would have kept pushing myself and call their bluff and force them to fire me.
    Originally posted by RSGSRT
    We've reached a point where natural selection doesn't have a chance in hell of keeping up with the procreation of imbeciles.
    Why is it acceptable for you to be an idiot, but not acceptable for me to point it out?

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Aerohead View Post
      Over a year later, the stigma of being a quitter hangs over my head. I hate myself for it. Part of me wishes I would have kept pushing myself and call their bluff and force them to fire me.
      Over the years I dealt with many officers who for one reason or another couldn't do the job.
      Some of them were just plain stupid, some were totally incompetent, but most were for "other" reasons................That being defined as...........just not ready for the job, just not cut out for the job, or family matters.

      I always respected the officer who came to me for advice about resigning. The officer that struggles (for what ever reason) in training to the point they THINK they need to resign----probably needs to. Many times this is not a bad thing.

      I had no problem looking an office in the eye and congratulating them on their decision-----it takes guts to voluntarily quit a dream, knowing that you are not going to complete that dream (at least at that moment)

      I often resented the person who forced me or my colleagues to fire them when they knew good and well they were not up to the job..............

      A resignation on good terms means a lot later on down the line..............ESPECIALLY if you plan on giving it a try later. The termination (after being given the chance for a clean resignation ) would have bitten you in the arse later
      Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

      My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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      • #18
        We had level 9.4 on the beep test that a few people couldn't measure up to. Then a recruiting drive started and they lowered it to 6.10. Too many people were still failing the physical test to even get in the academy so they dropped it to level 5.4.


        Sigh.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Aerohead View Post
          I resigned the academy in week 10 of 26. The hardest decision of my life. I entered the academy lacking the proper conditioning for the academy, and it got worse from there. Trying to make up for lost time only created injuries and aggravated old ones, to the point I just couldn't physically do it anymore. I lost weight in the academy, and my running improved a little, but I grew weak and lost strength. I kept falling behind on runs and the rest of the class was punished for it. The red man fight was the straw that broke the camel's back, as I failed miserably and it showed me that I couldn't even defend myself. They gave me the choice to resign on good terms and come back after getting it together physically, catch up my physical conditioning overnight, or be fired.

          Over a year later, the stigma of being a quitter hangs over my head. I hate myself for it. Part of me wishes I would have kept pushing myself and call their bluff and force them to fire me.
          Lose that mentality, it does no good. It's been a year. Learn from your experience and move on, though I respect your willingness to share what you went through. Go out and get it. It might not be this year or next year but hold onto your dream if you still want it.
          Judge me by the enemies I have made----Unknown

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Aerohead View Post
            I resigned the academy in week 10 of 26. The hardest decision of my life. I entered the academy lacking the proper conditioning for the academy, and it got worse from there. Trying to make up for lost time only created injuries and aggravated old ones, to the point I just couldn't physically do it anymore. I lost weight in the academy, and my running improved a little, but I grew weak and lost strength. I kept falling behind on runs and the rest of the class was punished for it. The red man fight was the straw that broke the camel's back, as I failed miserably and it showed me that I couldn't even defend myself. They gave me the choice to resign on good terms and come back after getting it together physically, catch up my physical conditioning overnight, or be fired.

            Over a year later, the stigma of being a quitter hangs over my head. I hate myself for it. Part of me wishes I would have kept pushing myself and call their bluff and force them to fire me.
            In the first 3 weeks, everyday I was one push up away from quitting. The next morning I did not want to get up and get smoked again. I knew if I didn't go, I would sleep in until 10am and regret it by noon. I took some beatings and moved on.
            Go wildcats!

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Aerohead View Post
              I resigned the academy in week 10 of 26. The hardest decision of my life. I entered the academy lacking the proper conditioning for the academy, and it got worse from there. Trying to make up for lost time only created injuries and aggravated old ones, to the point I just couldn't physically do it anymore. I lost weight in the academy, and my running improved a little, but I grew weak and lost strength. I kept falling behind on runs and the rest of the class was punished for it. The red man fight was the straw that broke the camel's back, as I failed miserably and it showed me that I couldn't even defend myself. They gave me the choice to resign on good terms and come back after getting it together physically, catch up my physical conditioning overnight, or be fired.

              Over a year later, the stigma of being a quitter hangs over my head. I hate myself for it. Part of me wishes I would have kept pushing myself and call their bluff and force them to fire me.
              I wouldn't consider that a failure at all. I applaud you for going after it and trying instead of wondering "what if". You weren't all talk, you gave it a shot and that's whats important. You can always go back and try it again if it's really what you want, and if not then there's nothing wrong in choosing a different path for your future.

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              • #22
                Thanks guys - I appreciate it. I just wanted to share my story for anyone who feels it may apply to their situation, and know that there are people out there who do actually fail, but pick themselves back up, and try again.

                I actually just finished the process to be a reserve police officer, which I think is a major step, as the department hires full time officers from their reserves, as I continue to heal and prepare for another attempt in the future.
                Originally posted by RSGSRT
                We've reached a point where natural selection doesn't have a chance in hell of keeping up with the procreation of imbeciles.
                Why is it acceptable for you to be an idiot, but not acceptable for me to point it out?

                Comment


                • #23
                  The first two weeks of our academy, we did PT every night for about an hour and a half. This was to condition people for what was coming. Regular PT/DT was every monday for 5 hours, and the other days of the week were all classroom days.

                  Anyway, in our class of about 30, we had me as an active duty Sailor, an active duty Gunny (that I was friends with from work before we went to the academy), a retired Master Chief, a retired First Class, and two former Marines. So, we are doing the PT, having a good time, trying to school the others in how it is going to go on the first night of regular PT. Some of them listened, some though they knew better (21-22 year olds who know everything....who would have thought?).

                  Well, the big day arrives, and we are formed up on the hill. The PT/DT instructors come out and make it boot camp style (the lead instructor was a former Gunny also). Well, the military guys can hardly keep from grinning, because we knew it was coming, and boot camp mentality really only works once. They are laying into people, not mean, but aggressive. They get to one kid, and all we were doing was situps to exhaustion, and he quits. Gets up and walks away. They pull him aside and I can hear them telling him that this is all mental, to work past it. He comes back. About 5 minutes later, he quits again, and we never see him again. I still do not know what his issue really was, other than he didnt believe us when we told him what was going to happen.

                  Anyway, the Gunny pulled me and the other military guys aside and asked us why we never really got shaken with them, and he figured out our backgrounds. He laughed. He was a great instructor.

                  The others did well. We only lost one other person, because he got some high paying job somewhere else and took it.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Usually it's "culture shock" (being thrown into a diff environment), the whole para-military thing, the PT... but I have seen emotional breakdowns as well as physical injuries.

                    When my class went through we had a little over 30, we graduated 17 folks 28 weeks later.
                    The sheep generally do not like the sheepdog. He looks a lot like the wolf. He has fangs and the capacity for violence. The difference, though, is that the sheepdog must not, cannot and will not ever harm the sheep. Any sheepdog who intentionally harms the lowliest little lamb will be punished and removed.

                    I Am the Sheepdog.


                    "And maybe just remind the few, if ill of us they speak,
                    that we are all that stands between
                    the monsters and the weak." - Michael Marks


                    sigpic

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                    • #25
                      Not everyone has what it takes. I'd much rather them quit than not.

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                      • #26
                        This may be a long post, as I have thought about this a few times during the day and many thoughts came to mind. I thought about quitting myself at one time, but I just couldn't. I was a bit older going in to the academy, and had more "life lessons" under my belt. Before you really get involved in LE, or in military, you see a glamorized view of it. Labels get thrown around like "hero" and "protector" and "courageous". Labels that speak to what we feel makes us men. And we want that. So we go after it. But about half way through, it starts sinking in.

                        Those labels come with price tags.

                        You find yourself being told that the job is 99% thankless, long, cold, lonely nights. Where is the hero stuff? You find out you have to respond to dead people and horrible tragedy that you can't do anything about. Where is the protector stuff? You are told you have to work traffic control, or years in a jail, or both - where is the courage in that? You start realizing there is more to it.

                        Then, you get the final piece of information.

                        Someday you will be face to face with a man that wants to kill you, and he is going to try. He doesn't know you, he doesn't want to know you, he doesn't care about you. He has immense hatred for the uniform you wear and the site of it sends him in to a blind rage. You find out that you will eventually get the skills to recognize this person - but when you do - you still have to stand up to him. In order to get those labels you secretly wanted to wear on your heart - you will have to win against evil. Not video game evil. Not spiritual evil fought with prayer alone. But real, live, evil.

                        Some people get scared away. Some people are drawn closer.

                        God calls on some, not all, to be warriors for the weak.

                        and those are my thoughts for today.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I hated the academy. All 30 weeks of it, except for the driving and shooting . It was more of a mental thing for me, Just being there every day and it seemed like it would never end. But everyday I knew there was nothing more that I wanted in life than to be a police officer and I couldnt let my self quit. I knew the regret of failure would be more of a pain for me than the physical pain i came home with from all the DT / PT everyday. I tell this to all the new recruits that I run into, The day I had my badge pinned on at graduation was the best feeling of my life. All the hard work & dedication was well worth it.

                          We lost a couple at ORIENTATION because the instructors put some light pressure on them. Then we lost one from our actual class. My dept. has officers who were involved in critical incidents (shootings, bad car crashes, etc.) come and talk to each recruit class. Our lecture day was probably about 9 weeks into the academy, right before we had the weekend off for Christmas and this guy never came back that monday. He left us all a message basically saying he didnt realize the realities of the career until these officers were face to face sharing thier near death experiences.
                          "Its not what you know, its what you can prove."-Training Day

                          "Game on, bitches. Whoop whoop, flash the lights, pull it over."

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Shush View Post
                            Someday you will be face to face with a man that wants to kill you, and he is going to try. He doesn't know you, he doesn't want to know you, he doesn't care about you. He has immense hatred for the uniform you wear and the site of it sends him in to a blind rage. You find out that you will eventually get the skills to recognize this person - but when you do - you still have to stand up to him. In order to get those labels you secretly wanted to wear on your heart - you will have to win against evil. Not video game evil. Not spiritual evil fought with prayer alone. But real, live, evil.

                            Some people get scared away. Some people are drawn closer.

                            God calls on some, not all, to be warriors for the weak.

                            and those are my thoughts for today.
                            Very well put brother.
                            "Its not what you know, its what you can prove."-Training Day

                            "Game on, bitches. Whoop whoop, flash the lights, pull it over."

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Thanks for all of the great replies everyone!

                              Aerohead, thanks for sharing your very personal experience. I hope you make it buddy!

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Greatness is laid across the shoulders of many, not all can carry it's weight
                                Originally posted by Rudy8116
                                The only reason I have one in the chamber at all times is because it is impossible to have two in.

                                Originally posted by CruiserClass
                                OC is my last option. I've never met anyone immune to electricity or physics.

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