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  • Still a rookie

    Hello, all!

    I'm glad to find this forum and looking forward to getting to know you. I've only been on the street for about two years. LE is my third career and I came to it at age 50, but I love it. Before becoming a university campus police officer, I was a correctional officer and before that I was a pastor.

    I hope to get to know some of you here and learn from your years of experience!

  • #2
    Originally posted by CampusCop1969 View Post
    Hello, all!

    I'm glad to find this forum and looking forward to getting to know you. I've only been on the street for about two years. LE is my third career and I came to it at age 50, but I love it. Before becoming a university campus police officer, I was a correctional officer and before that I was a pastor.

    I hope to get to know some of you here and learn from your years of experience!
    Excellent.

    I'm an honorably retired cop, I'm going to be 60 in a few months, I'm a youth minister, and I had three careers too.

    Comment


    • #3
      Youth minister, you’ve never shared that.

      Comment


      • Aidokea
        Aidokea commented
        Editing a comment
        It's never come up.

        Just got home last night from a 5-day lakeside church youth camp, leading a group of 14, including two undiagnosed autistic youth and one profoundly disabled Downs Syndrome youth.

        Temperatures of 106-108 degrees every day. Lights out at 2330 every night. Four casualties, including two bloody noses and two trips to the emergency room, one of which ended up going home early with a concussion. And one baptism.

        I slept for 11 hours straight after getting home, and I'm still tired.
        Last edited by Aidokea; 06-14-2022, 03:42 PM.

      • Aidokea
        Aidokea commented
        Editing a comment
        I've been serving youth as a volunteer for many years. Christmas toy drives, skateboard clinics, after school homework help 4 days a week, feeding them breakfast, feeding them dinner, leading Wednesday night youth group, Sunday school, and so on. My wife and I have done international church missions trips to China, South Korea, American Samoa, and the Philippines. We're planning to go to Mexico in November.

        Even though we home-schooled, we volunteered in the classrooms in the public school. My wife helped with second grade, and I helped with 10th and 12th grade English.

        And I was the CEO of a fairly well-funded youth non-profit corporation for years. We couldn't find anyone else to take over for us when we moved away, so we shut it down and gave the last $50K and all our laptop computers to a local church with the stipulation that it was to be used to serve the youth of that community.

        About 10 years ago, I did Christmas out of my own paycheck, for the children of a drug dealer that was doing time in the county jail during Christmas, on drug charges that I had arrested him for. His baby-mama said they had nothing, so I contacted him in jail and asked if I could buy, wrap, and deliver presents to his kids, labeled "from Daddy", to which he agreed. When we dropped off the presents at his house, we saw that his kids were sleeping on the floor on flattened cardboard boxes, so we gave them a bed, bought new child themed bedding for it, took it over to their house, and set it up for them.
        Last edited by Aidokea; 06-14-2022, 10:12 AM.

      • Aidokea
        Aidokea commented
        Editing a comment
        ...and to be clear, I've never accepted a penny of pay for youth work, even though I've been offered a paycheck for it.

    • #4
      You’re a good man Charlie Brown,………

      Comment


      • Aidokea
        Aidokea commented
        Editing a comment
        Nah. It's all God.

    • #5
      So CampusCop1969, I assume from your username that you're an SRO or something like that?

      I have never been an SRO, but I have known SROs and worked closely with them, and a difficult issue that seems to come up over, and over, and over again, is dress code violations, almost exclusively by females.

      And there was a lot of that at this church camp I was at too. The rules looked similar to most school policies, with the addition of swimwear rules requiring one-piece swimsuits with shorts, and a T-shirt over that if there were any "issues" in the boobal region.

      There were about 500 youth there, and even the college-aged staff females were largely in violation.

      Forget fingertip-length shorts, a lot of the girls and young adult females were wearing wrist-length shorts. A lot of the shorts were thin enough, tight enough, short enough, and went enough places that shorts didn't need to go, that the shorts themselves probably should have been arrested for child sex assault.

      Some of the females wore shirts that didn't reach their shorts, or knotted them to make them too short. Lots of Lululemon yoga attire. Too many Daisy Dukes. One wore a skintight form-fitting translucent white top that you could clearly see her hot-pink bra through.

      And it didn't get any better at the lake. Another youth leader said they saw a girl in a 2-piece thong swimsuit, with a T-shirt cover-up. I saw numerous tiny 2-piece bikinis combined with white T-shirt cover-ups, even though the rules said no white T-shirts as cover-ups because you can see right through them when they're wet. We also saw plenty of too-small one-piece swimsuits being worn without cover-ups, so that we were exposed to half of their butt cheeks hanging out, as well as way too much of their little speed-bumps.

      It looked like no other youth leaders, parents, or camp staff were enforcing anything, which made it more difficult for me to gain compliance with our females. It's in their nature to test boundaries, and they just don't understand why I won't let them do what everyone else is doing.

      And although it shouldn't matter, a LOT of these girls are extremely blessed physically. A lot of people that don't know any better, think that pretty girls come from California. But the outward physical appearance produced by all of that hair-bleaching, hair extensions, colored contacts, starvation dieting, exercise, and cosmetic surgery in California, just happens naturally here, and it happens a LOT- Texas has had 50% more Miss USA winners than second-place California. It's not even close.

      As the father of a daughter, maybe I'm just more sensitivity to this issue than most, but in my opinion NOBODY needs to know as much about the exact anatomical details of other people's teenaged daughters, as that kind of attire so clearly communicates.

      [/rant]
      Last edited by Aidokea; 06-14-2022, 08:24 PM.

      Comment


      • CampusCop1969
        CampusCop1969 commented
        Editing a comment
        Nope, I'm not an SRO. I'm with the University PD in one of the major university cities in my state. (I think most state universities have police departments.)

        The funny thing about working for our department is that many people in the city--and even some people who work at or attend the University--don't realize the University has it's own police department. Of those who do know we exist, I think many assume we are just "campus security." They don't realize we aren't rent-a-cops but are in fact a full-service police force with real cuffs and real guns and that we can write real citations and take people to a real jail.

        We tend not to be noticed because the media pays more attention to our city police, county sheriff's office, and the state patrol. But we do work right alongside the other departments because we aren't restricted to campus. We have authority pretty much through our whole state. We patrol the city streets especially on nights when the students go to the bars. We cross paths with the city cops all the time, and we will even take some of their calls if they get too busy. We back up the city cops on traffic stops and vice-versa.

        In a way, being a university cop is the best of both worlds. Many of the issues we deal with have to do with students, and things aren't super dangerous. Lots of MIP and narcotics calls. We get our share of mental health and suicidal calls involving students too. We don't get a lot of domestic assault issues with our students. On the other hand, we deal with the city residents which is where we get a lot of DUI. We've even responded to the occasional weapons call or fight in progress with the city cops. And of course we train for the nightmare scenario of an active shooter.

        Some officers would say the biggest perk of being a university cop is you get paid to work at the sporting events. I'm not really a sports fan, but most guys like that.

    • #6
      ...and what's the deal with today's teenaged boys?

      I had to threaten several 16 year old boys to get them to shower, during a week of 105+ degree temperatures. They actually claimed to be allergic to water. One of them didn't know how a shower operates, so I had to have his peers show him.

      And the pussification of today's male youth is absolutely incredible.

      I'll be 60 in a few months, I was retired by an injury in the line of duty that involved a torn rotator cuff and tearing the bicep off, and I had to step in for one physical event involving a four-man push-up contest, because I didn't have a single male youth in our group capable of benching their own body weight.

      I had a scrawny pasty-white 16 year old that plays violent video games every waking moment, that couldn't do a single push-up on his own, much less a 4-man push-up. In an earlier event, which involved a smaller youth jumping on his back piggyback style, he folded and fell to the ground as if he'd been knocked out. At one point during the week, he picked his nose, and told me that it was a nose bleed, to try to get out of a physical activity. And any physical game I forced him to participate in, he intentionally lost, as soon as possible, so that he wouldn't have to exert himself. Given the context that there are 17 year old Navy SEALs, this just blows my mind.

      I didn't hear a single "Yes, sir." from him the entire week- if you're from the south or have military parents, you'd understand what this means.

      His mother was my assistant leader, looking over the females, and she wouldn't discipline him. She said she's been fighting (and apparently losing) this battle for 16 years, and she didn't think that disciplining him now would make any difference. My late father was a Marine from Texas, and I think he would beg to differ- he used to say that he couldn't make me do what I was supposed to do, but he could sure make me wish that I had. I grew up black and blue and well behaved. I ended up as a police officer, largely because my father never taught me how to fail.
      Last edited by Aidokea; 06-14-2022, 08:28 PM.

      Comment


      • #7
        Originally posted by CampusCop1969 View Post
        Hello, all!

        I'm glad to find this forum and looking forward to getting to know you. I've only been on the street for about two years. LE is my third career and I came to it at age 50, but I love it. Before becoming a university campus police officer, I was a correctional officer and before that I was a pastor.

        I hope to get to know some of you here and learn from your years of experience!
        Hello neighbor.

        I live about 35 miles from your rival campus & know a few of their officers...................... Probably the hardest cop job in the world is Campus Cop. Especially at a liberal college in a liberal town. Yes it has troubles that other places couldn't think of.

        Background 66 yrs old--11 yrs retired-- after a total of 30 yrs with the DOC in a maximum security prison. I was a deputy sheriff for 5 yrs in the 2nd largest county in Iowa in between my two DOC stints & since I retired from the DOC as a Lieutenant I have been working as a part time Court Security / Transport officer for a small county Sheriff's Office. Yep I am working on my 46th yr in uniform now

        Back in the day my county deputies often backed up the county where the University is because we had more manpower on duty at night when help was needed for "events" that were held in the back woods of the federal reservoir, in the north part of the county. Plus our big city had 2 four yr colleges ---- BEFORE my time our deputies worked the riots during protests during Viet Nam .

        One of my academy mates was around 50 and worked a different University at a time they DID NOT carry weapons but were still certified officers.....

        There are a couple Nebraska based cops on here ---mostly not active anymore --- but one just retired from the Troopers and the other is a Airport Cop in Omaha
        My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

        Comment


        • CampusCop1969
          CampusCop1969 commented
          Editing a comment
          Good to meet you, #1603!

          Yeah, here in Nebraska the campus PD is kind of the dirty little secret or the black sheep in the university family. The university will gladly use our services when needed, but they don't encourage us to actively make our presence known on social media or to do high-profile recruiting for our department. After all, if the campus has a PD, that means there's crime on campus, and parents won't spend the big bucks to send their privileged kids to the university. (That's why our K9 unit is only for bomb-sniffing, not for drugs or apprehending suspects.) When the George Floyd verdict came out, the university pretended we didn't exist and sent out a campus-wide email praising the outcome of the case as a good first step toward racial justice.

          Still, I do enjoy working for a campus PD. If I had started in law enforcement 20 years ago, maybe I'd be more interested in a city department, but at my age I'm content to be a campus cop. We still patrol the same streets as the city cops, so we do get to play with the big boys when we want to.

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