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New member from South -Africa

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  • New member from South -Africa

    Hi, all of you, I'm new on this forum and just wanted to thank admin for ecepting me on your page. I am a member ofthe South African police force and wiil be 29 years at the end of Desember, at K9 unit. I am in the police for 31 years noe and still would like to work for a minimum of 7 years. I am a narcitic dog handler now, but dit work and train patrole an explosive, previously in my career. I love working and training dogs and this is the main reason that I am still in the South African police.

  • #2
    Welcome Duif!
    Now go home and get your shine box!

    Comment


    • #3
      welcome bloke

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      • #4
        Thanks guys

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        • #5
          Welcome to the forums!
          Given your length of service to date, and your desire to stay 7 more, I was wondering - are you staying to hit a particular combination of age + service for pension purposes, or that you still like chasing your dog and life is just that much fun?
          #32936 - Royal Canadian Mounted Police - 1975-10-27 / 2010-12-29
          Proud Dad of #54266 - RCMP - 2007-02-12 to date
          RCMP Veterans Association - Regina Division member
          Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada - Associate (Retired) member
          "Smile" - no!

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          • #6
            Welcome to O.com. I've trained with DPCI hawks and spent time in Cape Town and Umlhanga so I have a sense of your world....

            South Africa is enchantingly beautiful. And nothing compares to your braai (bbq).
            One day, lad, this will all be yours.

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            • #7
              Likewise, Seapoint, Cape Town, KZN, and other places in the 90s. I still hold a Reservist Constable warrant card and badge as my most prized possessions. Good times.

              And I still laugh at the Dog Unit guys who put “something” in my luggage when I was leaving JHB... I thought I was dead meat when the Air
              Port unit K9 hit on it! Lekker Good times...
              Now go home and get your shine box!

              Comment


              • #8
                Just to give some context to the typical O.com reader what it's like in South Africa, or at least my impressions...

                On one hand, it's a very surreal place and I don't mean this in a pejorative sense. Surreal because many things people in the U.S. are accustomed to are present, but with a unique twist. For example, they have Hooters in South Africa. The girls wear the same outfits, the food is the same greasy fare, but you'll never see fruit bats circling above the rooftop deck of a Hooters in Florida. I once sat with my mouth agape as these flying cats came to roost at a big tree next to the Hooters in Umlhanga Rocks.

                Another example is the wineries. Western South Africa is known for it's wine industry, and a tour of a winery in Stellenbosch is very similar to a winery tour in Napa Valley, as both offer plenty of bucolic elegance and countryside hospitality. The only difference, other than a pinot is more likely to be paired with dried gemsbok meat, are the guards with automatic rifles at the front gates. That would be unusual in Napa Valley.

                Violence seems more ubiquitous in South Africa, especially in rural areas. Not that the U.S. isn't a violent place (it is), but the violence is mostly confined to large urban centers. In this regard, I would compare Cape Town to Detroit, where both cities have daily homicides, both cities have large swaths of extreme poverty, and both cities are awash in gangs guns and drugs. But once you're a couple hours away from Detroit (or any big U.S. city), there's little chance of encountering violence. The folks in South Africa were telling me that's not the situation there.

                Another aspect to note is how modern the infrastructure is. Anyone who has travelled to different corners of the globe can attest to the general lack of infrastructure in many places, as in wires on power poles that resemble hairballs or public toilets consisting of a cement slab with a few holes and a community bucket and ladle. I didn't see anything like that and in fact can only defer the roads and general building infrastructure as being tip top.

                And the people of South Africa I encountered could not have been friendlier. It's very easy to engage in conversation and people have a very similar sense of humor to U.S. humor. And it's funny how the South African cops complain about the same things as U.S. cops- despite being another continent away, they have the same issues with prosecutors not taking cases, being buried in paperwork, internal politics, etc. There is truth to a universal brotherhood for those in blue.

                And if you ever get the chance to go to a braai and eat mutton and coriander sausages and drink cold Castle beer, I highly recommend it.




                One day, lad, this will all be yours.

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                • #9
                  Another similarity between downtown Cape Town and Detroit: you don't want to be outside after the sun goes down. I'll never forget the multi-block sprint up Burg Street and Greenmarket Square one night that was straight out a zombie movie....
                  One day, lad, this will all be yours.

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                  • #10
                    Were you there for the Taxi Wars?
                    Now go home and get your shine box!

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                    • Ratatatat
                      Ratatatat commented
                      Editing a comment
                      That was the 1990s. I was there very recently.

                  • #11
                    Rat,

                    You forget to mention the drive through Paarl...the never ending drive...
                    Now go home and get your shine box!

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      The final thought that comes to mind about South Africa is how difficult policing is there. I saw conditions in the Cape Flats first hand and can attest they are as challenging as any 'hood in the U.S., if not more so. When I was there, various street gangs were beefing and bodies were in the streets every day. It's been that way for a long time and isn't changing. A common practice is to film execution-style shootings and then post on the internet. The deceased are often kids- 12, 13, and 14 years old. It's a tough a place to police and I say that having worked a few tough places. Despite the daily carnage, the SAPS guys I got to know still retained their compass bearings. My heart goes out to them as I don't think the future will be any easier...
                      One day, lad, this will all be yours.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        So you saw guys getting necklaced by PAGAD? Patrolled townships in a Casspir? Watched them Toy-Toy while they moved into your line?

                        BTDT.
                        Now go home and get your shine box!

                        Comment

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