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California Department of State Hospital Police Hiring Process HPD-17-4

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  • California Department of State Hospital Police Hiring Process HPD-17-4

    Hello, I'm in the process with CA Department of State Hospital Police (DSH) Metroplolian Station and I can't find any updated threads for information regarding the process. Is anyone part of Job Code (JC) JC81280 or group HPD-17-4 that tested in October or November, 2017?
    So far I've had my background orientation, background interview with the Chief, Reference letters sent out, secondary reference interviews done, public records checked, and previous employment inquiries done. I haven't had a home visit though. The only steps I have left to complete are the psych/medical. The last time I reached out to the lead investigator working my file (since I only had his contact info), he's told me that my file has been returned to the station.

    If anyone has any information on how the process goes or any relative information at all, feel free to message me or post on here. I feel anxious and curious since I haven't heard anything, especially with the "No news is good news mentality."

    Thank You.




  • #2
    The Department of State Hospitals’ (DSH) police officers provide safety, service, and security to patients, employees and the public in and around each hospital. There are approximately 700 DSH Police Officers, 30 Communications Operators (Dispatchers) and 40 Investigators assigned to five different hospitals (Atascadero, Coalinga, Metropolitan/LA, Napa, and Patton) in California. In addition to police responsibilities and investigations, law enforcement personnel work closely with clinical staff to ensure the safe treatment of the more than 6,300 patients assigned to the facilities and the safety of the more than 10,000 DSH employees.

    http://www.dsh.ca.gov/Law_Enforcement/default.aspx
    700 police officers for five hospitals? Wow.

    10,000 employees for 6,300 patients? Wow.

    In many, if not most states, the trend has been to close large state-run mental institutions in favor of local treatment, i.e. - group homes. Now arguments can be made whether the treatment is better or worse, i.e.- outpatient foster care vs. hospitalization, and valid arguments can be made about public safety. But from a taxpayer standpoint, there's no argument: institutionalization is cost prohibitive. Evidently California hasn't figured this out....
    To avoid criticism, do nothing, say nothing, and be nothing.

    -Elbert Hubbard

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    • #3
      I feel anxious

      How ironic.
      To avoid criticism, do nothing, say nothing, and be nothing.

      -Elbert Hubbard

      Comment


      • #4
        Ratatatat,

        These are hospitals for the criminally insane. (Not guilty by reason of insanity.) The patients are not someone with anxiety trying to off themselves, It's little JoJo killing three nuns because Kermit the Frog told him to do so.

        Their PDs are not someplace you want to work. OP, do a search of previous posts regarding the hospital police. If you still want to proceed in spite of what you read, then abandon all hope as you do so at your own peril.

        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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        • #5

          These are hospitals for the criminally insane
          L-1: I get that. But is it unique to California to have its own distinct state hospital police agency?? I've lived in a bunch of states over the years and have not seen state hospital police elsewhere

          My current state has one hospital for the criminally insane, and is run by the Department of Corrections. It's located in the adjacent county to which I live, so local news sometimes runs stories about new residents. Like the guy who killed his mother, gouged out her eyeballs, and ate them.


          I concur with your recommendation to the OP to do some serious reflecting before jumping in with both feet.



          To avoid criticism, do nothing, say nothing, and be nothing.

          -Elbert Hubbard

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ratatatat View Post


            L-1: I get that. But is it unique to California to have its own distinct state hospital police agency?? I've lived in a bunch of states over the years and have not seen state hospital police elsewhere

            My current state has one hospital for the criminally insane, and is run by the Department of Corrections. It's located in the adjacent county to which I live, so local news sometimes runs stories about new residents. Like the guy who killed his mother, gouged out her eyeballs, and ate them.


            I concur with your recommendation to the OP to do some serious reflecting before jumping in with both feet.


            Ours are operated by the Department of Human Services(same agency that runs welfare and the Child Protective Services ) and the "police" are whatever poor city the 2 institutions are located .
            Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

            My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

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            • #7
              Ratatatat,

              I'm guessing you are somewhere on the east coast or nearby. California is what's know has a "home rule" or "local rule" state. What the means is, each city, county government entity wants to retain as much power as possible locally. That's why we don't have a state police and each county sheriff does what a State Police agency might do outside incorporated cities. Similarly, government agencies try to retain as much power and authority for themselves, so whenever they can do so, everyone has their own police. This is not only at the local (city/county) level, but the state level as well.

              I think the idea is two fold, first to retain as much power locally and to prevent any one government agency from becoming too powerful. The state of California divides its police power among 35 separate state agencies, each having many branches. The hospitals are so controlling that state law appoints the untrained civilian hospital administrator as the Chief Law Enforcement Officer rather than the Chief of Police. That alone speaks to what goes on there.
              Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

              Comment


              • Ratatatat
                Ratatatat commented
                Editing a comment
                Hmmm. Ok. Thanks for the explanation. I've lived in states on both coasts and several in the middle (never CA though). I was in Ohio for a miserable year and it resembled that structure but I had never heard of a 700 officer police agency solely for the state mental hospitals. Learn something new everyday here....

              • L-1
                L-1 commented
                Editing a comment
                Each hospital runs its own separate police department that's independent of the others.

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