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  • Texas Executes Mexican-Born Killer

    I was living in Houston when this crime occurred, good riddance to bad rubbish.

    Texas executes Mexican-born killer

    By Michael Graczyk
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    8:18 p.m. August 5, 2008
    HUNTSVILLE, Texas – A Mexican-born condemned prisoner was executed Tuesday night for the rape and murder of two teenage girls 15 years ago after a divided U.S. Supreme Court rejected his request for a reprieve.
    Jose Medellin's case attracted international attention after he raised claims he wasn't allowed to consult the Mexican consulate for legal help following his arrest. State officials say he didn't ask to do so until well after he was convicted of capital murder.

    Medellin, 33, faced lethal injection for participating in the 1993 gang rape, beating and strangling of Elizabeth Pena, 16, and Jennifer Ertman, 14. He and five fellow gang members attacked the Houston girls as they were walking home on a June night, raped and tortured them for an hour, then kicked and stomped them before using a belt and shoelaces to strangle them.

    Their remains were found four days later. By then, Medellin already had bragged to friends about the killings.

    Medellin's attorneys contended he was denied the protections of the Vienna Convention, which calls for people arrested to have access to their home country's consular officials.

    The International Court of Justice said Medellin and some 50 other Mexicans on death rows around the U.S. should have new hearings in U.S. courts to determine whether the 1963 treaty was violated during their arrests. Medellin was the first among them to die.

    President Bush asked states to review the cases, but the U.S. Supreme Court ruled earlier this year neither the president nor the international court can force Texas to wait.

    Gov. Rick Perry, Texas courts and the Texas attorney general's office all said the execution should go forward and that Medellin has had multiple legal reviews. State officials noted Medellin never invoked his consular rights under the Vienna Convention until some four years after he was convicted of capital murder.

    Medellin was 3 when he came to the United States and grew up in Houston, where he learned English and attended school.

    His lawyers asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday to stop the execution until legislation can be passed to formalize case reviews ordered by the International Court of Justice.

    The high court said in its ruling that that possibility was too remote to justify a stay. Four justices issued dissenting opinions. Justice Stephen Breyer wrote that to permit the execution would place the United States “irremediably in violation of international law and breaks our treaty promises.”

    Medellin's supporters said either Congress or the Texas Legislature should have been given a chance to pass a law setting up procedures for new hearings. A bill to implement the international court's ruling wasn't introduced in Congress until last month. The Texas Legislature doesn't meet until January.

    Randy Ertman, who lost his daughter in the attack, said Medellin's supporters were misguided.

    “Mexico has a big yard down there full of filth and murders and gangs and drug cartels and they're not mentioning anything about that,” he said. “There's where they need to start their work.”

    On Monday, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected a request for a reprieve and denied his lawyers permission to file new appeals. The Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles also rejected requests for clemency and a 240-day reprieve.

    “I don't want sympathy or pity, I'd rather have your anger,” Medellin said on an anti-death penalty Web site where prisoners seek pen pals. “Don't feel sorry for me. I'm where I'm at because I made an adolescent choice. That's it!”

    One of Medellin's fellow gang members, Derrick O'Brien, was executed two years ago. Another, Peter Cantu, described as the ringleader of the group, is on death row. He does not have a death date.

    Two others, Efrain Perez and Raul Villarreal, had their death sentences commuted to life in prison when the Supreme Court barred executions for those who were 17 at the time of their crimes. The sixth person convicted, Medellin's brother, Vernancio, was 14 at the time and is serving a 40-year prison term.

    Medellin's execution was the fifth this year in the nation's busiest capital punishment state.
    Molly Weasley makes Chuck Norris eat his vegetables.

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  • #2
    Last I heard they were in a holding pattern.

    Oh well..see ya! Thanks for the update.
    This profession is not for people looking for positive reinforcement from the public. Very often it can be a thankless job and you can't desire accolades, because those are not usually forthcoming. Just do your job to the best of your ability and live with the decisions you've made.

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    • #3
      Yeah, because Mexico gives a damn about US citizens in Mexico... They don't even care about their own people. Its sad/funny how often the Mexican Consulate hangs up on aliens who call them when in custody.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by willowdared View Post
        [COLOR="Navy"]His lawyers asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday to stop the execution until legislation can be passed to formalize case reviews ordered by the International Court of Justice.

        Medellin's supporters said either Congress or the Texas Legislature should have been given a chance to pass a law setting up procedures for new hearings.
        I'll sleep a little better tonight. WTF? Now those opposed to the death penalty want executions to be stopped so new legislation can be passed? Gee, I guess complying with current laws aren't good enough to "insure justice." Now according to four members of the U.S. Supreme Court, we have to give the defense the opportunity to get new legislation?

        Besides, it should be a cold day in [email protected]** when members of the International Court of Justice (from countries like Libya, Iran, Venezuela and Cuba) have the authority to decide what penalties murderers in our country receive.
        "I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."

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        • #5
          He was only three when he came to the US...funny how he forgot he was a Mexican citizen until after he was in prison.
          Molly Weasley makes Chuck Norris eat his vegetables.

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          • #6
            Yipee, only 14 years too late.

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            • #7
              No court outside the US has jurisdiction inside unless we as a nation accept it. Hopefully we will never come to that. We need to retain the right to tell these leefty fools, like AI, to go f*ck themselves.

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              • #8
                He was only three when he came to the US...funny how he forgot he was a Mexican citizen until after he was in prison.
                Man, parents sacrifice everything to bring their kids to the states for a better life, and this is how they repay them...Sad...Oh well suck to be him...

                PS...The Mexican government sucks...
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by pulicords View Post
                  I'll sleep a little better tonight. WTF? Now those opposed to the death penalty want executions to be stopped so new legislation can be passed? Gee, I guess complying with current laws aren't good enough to "insure justice." Now according to four members of the U.S. Supreme Court, we have to give the defense the opportunity to get new legislation?

                  Besides, it should be a cold day in [email protected]** when members of the International Court of Justice (from countries like Libya, Iran, Venezuela and Cuba) have the authority to decide what penalties murderers in our country receive.
                  You can rest assured they don't care how we feel about the administration of laws in thiers

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                  • #10
                    I hate to be a dissenter, especially since I will not mourn this dirt bags worthless life. But, next time an American citizen is detained and accused of a crime in another contry and we don't believe the story we are fed about, how they "confessed", were treated, or punished, suck it up. We now as a nation have no standing to try to extridite them or intervene. I believe the biggest rub is that Mexico does not "officially" condone the death penalty, that is not a statement to the treament of prisoners or fairness in their trial system or the like. I know all of the horror stories about brutality and people getting killed or lost in the international justice systems. That is differnt than the court or goverment officially condoning a percieved mis-carriage of justice.

                    I don't care so much about this particular case, but about the ramifications, for spray painters in Thailand and accused rapists in Japan when they are rail roaded and there is nothing our goverment can do about it.

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                    • #11
                      Glad he's dead, sorry it took them almost 18 years from the time he committed the crimes for him to die. Should have been right after conviction. The tax payers will never get that $ back from feeding his sorry self.
                      Originally Posted by VegasMetro
                      maybe it’s me but I think a six pack and midget porn makes for good times?????

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by NORCOCOP View Post
                        I hate to be a dissenter, especially since I will not mourn this dirt bags worthless life. But, next time an American citizen is detained and accused of a crime in another contry and we don't believe the story we are fed about, how they "confessed", were treated, or punished, suck it up. We now as a nation have no standing to try to extridite them or intervene.
                        You make a valid point, but let's put the death penalty aside for a moment.

                        Do you think that if a foreign national serves a jail term in the US rather than in his own country, Mexico for example, that his living conditions would be worse or better? I would bet my house that his time here would be like Paradise Island compared to a foreign prison.

                        These same foreign countries don't give a rats *** as to disparity of treatment for our nationals regarding their prisons versus our prisons. In other words, if the US complains that living conditions in their prisons are substandard, would they care - of course not. Watch the cable show "Locked Up Abroad" for a perspective.

                        Now, having said that, f*ck the Mexican government. That killer got more due process rights that he would ever have received in Mexico. Let him rot.
                        I’ll die with blue in my veins.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by NORCOCOP View Post
                          I hate to be a dissenter, especially since I will not mourn this dirt bags worthless life. But, next time an American citizen is detained and accused of a crime in another contry and we don't believe the story we are fed about, how they "confessed", were treated, or punished, suck it up. We now as a nation have no standing to try to extridite them or intervene. I believe the biggest rub is that Mexico does not "officially" condone the death penalty, that is not a statement to the treament of prisoners or fairness in their trial system or the like. I know all of the horror stories about brutality and people getting killed or lost in the international justice systems. That is differnt than the court or goverment officially condoning a percieved mis-carriage of justice.

                          I don't care so much about this particular case, but about the ramifications, for spray painters in Thailand and accused rapists in Japan when they are rail roaded and there is nothing our goverment can do about it.
                          The problem I have with that argument, is that he came to the US when he was 3 years old. He committed his crime when he was 19.

                          That's 16 years living in the US, and being educated on our dime.

                          He did not "claim" his Mexican citizenship until he was three years into his sentence.

                          Those two girls were walking home from a party and interrupted a gang initiation being led by this POS.
                          Molly Weasley makes Chuck Norris eat his vegetables.

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                          • #14
                            Pulicords, I was told you're not supposed to use language like "WTF" on this site!

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                            • #15
                              They release the dirtbag that ran over and killed that BP agent, and then expect us to respect their demands on a convicted double murderer??

                              yeah right. good riddance.
                              "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." - Orwell

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