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  • RachelR
    replied
    Changing Lanes a film noir? Not hardly! Sorry, but I VERY MUCH so disagree with that one.

    Leave a comment:


  • n567
    replied
    Blade Runner and Minority Report are both great film noir movies based on the fantastic P.K Dick... the other movies based on his writings are best left forgotten.

    I rather enjoyed Changing Lanes... contemporary film noir?

    Leave a comment:


  • lone ranger
    replied
    German expressionism combined with the crime/ganster dramas of the 1930's, but with a different mood.

    It's all in the mood. The primary moods of classic noir are melancholy, alienation, bleakness, dissillusionment, disenchantment, pessimisim, ambiguity, moral corruption, evil, guilt, and of course, paranoia.

    Mood conveyed to us through the camera. Settings with low key lighting, putting the emphasis on the whole scene and not the actors. Interior scenes with venetian-blinded windows, light and dark, casting shadows across the actors faces, good and evil, light and dark. Circling cigarette smoke forming a question mark in the air.

    Exteriors are often urban night scenes with deep shadows, wet asphalt, rain-slicked or mean streets, flashing neon signs. large vacant office buildings lending vertical prespective to the scene making the whole world look like a prison.

    Complex voice over narratives, typically told with flashbacks, or a series of flashbacks. revelations are made to justify the protagonists cynical perspective on life.

    If it starts off with a seemingly ordinary guy walking into a police station and saying " I want to report a murder- mine."

    Then it's noir.

    Oh I forgot another good one "Murder my Sweet,"the movie version of Farewell my Lovely. Dick Powell as private eye Phillip Marloe.

    I know one thing Shooter, when they tell you you're not going to need a gun. You'd better take one.

    [ 01-26-2003, 10:39 PM: Message edited by: lone ranger ]

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  • RachelR
    replied
    Hey Sparky, have you ever seen some of the German Expressionist art of that day? ASome pretty freaky ****, let me tell ya!

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  • Sparky
    replied
    And to further confuse you shooter, film noir has it's origins in German expressionism from the late 19th and early 20th Century. Early expressionist styled films such as Das Kabinett des Doktor Caligari were big influences on what would leter be identified as a film style that was distintcly American.

    However, there was a very strong German and Austrian influence throughout. Actors such as Peter Lorre, Marlene Dietrich, Paul Henried, Conrad Veidt were all Austrian. Many directors were also Austrian such as Fritz Lang (M), Billy Wilder(Double Indemnity), and Michael Curtiz (Casablanca).

    So.. it originates in Germany/Austria.

    Then it migrates to America and becomes uniquely American.

    It is then labeled by the french as film noir.. literally "black film".

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  • shooter1201
    replied
    More?

    The Vanishing...the original

    Frankenstein...the original

    Nosferatu...silent film(precursor to Dracula)

    Dracula...the original

    [ 01-26-2003, 07:23 AM: Message edited by: shooter1201 ]

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  • lone ranger
    replied
    I forgot a really good one.

    Detour! They don't show that one too often.

    If it has a hard boiled anti social loner, usually a private detective as a protagonist it's noir.

    If it takes place in a huge dark scary metropolis, anonymity through large scale surroundings..

    If theres a woman that you think you love but also can't entirely trust. She seems to love you too but also likes material things and you're not sure you can leave her alone with that suitcase full of money...it's noir

    or if it has two seemingly ordinary people thrown into an unusual circumstance where they face the prisoner's dilema: to cooperate or betray each other...it's noir.

    Like Sparky was saying there are the traditionalists that treat it as a genre. And then it's limited to a bunch of films made in the late 40's and early fifties. If it was written by Chandler, Hammett, or Cain and it was made into a movie it's noir.

    But like Sparky, I think noir is a stlye rather than a genre. So there are more films that have the noir style. Like Blade Runner. I think you could even consider Tall in the Saddle to be a Noir Western or maybe Stagecoach if you look at some of the characters. The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, spy movie with a very Noir ending.

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  • shooter1201
    replied
    What about the original:

    Night of the Living Dead?

    I'm still confused about what exactly determines if a film qualifies.

    Leave a comment:


  • KYGlockShooter
    replied
    The Big Sleep was an amazing film that took on some pretty racy issues for its time. Of course, you shouldn't forget one of the greatest tributes to Film Noir: Chinatown.

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  • shooter1201
    replied
    Another:

    Cape Fear...the original.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    quote:
    <--- slides a Pabst Blue Ribbon to Frank
    Hi neighbor.

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  • CinaC
    replied
    I think "L.A. Confidential" qualifies.

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  • RachelR
    replied
    Wow, didn't realize how many film buffs we had in here! Of course, I should have figured that a cop's taste would run mainly dark and noir'ish Too many movies for me to view in a quarter but now I have some suggestions that aren't on the lists.. Maybe I can finally impress that hard to impress prof with my film noir expertise! haha

    OK, watched some of The Postman Always Rings Twice and I just have to say.. the beginning of it is the cheesiest I have ever seen, lol. I was LMAO. I've only got 20 minutes into it and it's boring so far. Scarlet Street was sooo much better.

    And also another thing.. that Fred MacMurray.. wow!! He must have been the George Clooney of the 40's!!

    Leave a comment:


  • shooter1201
    replied
    quote:
    Gina Gershon
    She deserves her OWN thread. Yummmmmmmmmm........!

    Leave a comment:


  • lone ranger
    replied
    I forgot Kiss of Death (again the original not the remake)

    Touch of Evil, D.O.A., and Blade Runner are my favorites.

    The more recent Palmetto isn't a bad noir. I give it a thumbs up just because it has Gina Gershon in it.

    [ 01-24-2003, 09:48 PM: Message edited by: lone ranger ]

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