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  • its not necessary

    i just watched a program about a confessed criminal. During the program the law enforcment personnel kept referring to the criminal as Mister whenever they mentioned his name. Why? he didnt even deserve the word mister. I never understand that...

  • #2
    Because "*****head" is not PC nor it is professional

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    • #3
      You can also get them to do more and act nicer by actually talking to them and not down to them. Just because someone is in cuffs and chains does not mean they can not be treated with a little courtesy.

      Klar
      Are you a Veteran? If so join AMVETS the only organization that accepts all vets no matter when or where they served. Contact me for more info.

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      • #4
        Klar's right... respect is important when dealing with people... even with criminals

        I try to have great officer/prisoner relations.... most of the people I deal with are repeat offenders.... dopers, hypes, gang-bangers, parolees....

        We've dealt with each other so much, we know each other on first name basis... it's a very professional relationship. When caught, they smile and say.. "ahhh Dave, got me this time"..... at booking, I ask how their family is and what he's been up to...we chat about how funny the arrest was and people in the neighborhood...

        It's a demented friendship, they know I am only doing my job and I know they are doing theirs, there are no hard feelings and it's nothing personal.

        My trainees are quite surprised, because most of the time, the trainees are trying to prove themselves by being overly aggressive, and I am treating this criminal like a friend of mine...... I even formally introduce my 'regulars' to my trainees...

        I don't know, perhaps I am doing it all wrong.... but I think this tactic makes things go a lot easier on the streets.

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        • #5
          It does help out on the streets odie. I have seen it where some of my "regular" customers would come up to me and tell me of some joe smoo out in their neighbor hood causing problems. To have citizens who respect you telling you more of what is going on then that other officer because they know and respect you and that "other" officer is a snob. Yes I have found that a little respect can get you a lot farther in this world than being rude or obnoxious.

          Klar
          Are you a Veteran? If so join AMVETS the only organization that accepts all vets no matter when or where they served. Contact me for more info.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by occiferdave:
            Klar's right... respect is important when dealing with people... even with criminals

            I try to have great officer/prisoner relations.... most of the people I deal with are repeat offenders.... dopers, hypes, gang-bangers, parolees....

            We've dealt with each other so much, we know each other on first name basis... it's a very professional relationship. When caught, they smile and say.. "ahhh Dave, got me this time"..... at booking, I ask how their family is and what he's been up to...we chat about how funny the arrest was and people in the neighborhood...

            It's a demented friendship, they know I am only doing my job and I know they are doing theirs, there are no hard feelings and it's nothing personal.

            My trainees are quite surprised, because most of the time, the trainees are trying to prove themselves by being overly aggressive, and I am treating this criminal like a friend of mine...... I even formally introduce my 'regulars' to my trainees...

            I don't know, perhaps I am doing it all wrong.... but I think this tactic makes things go a lot easier on the streets.
            Not only on the street, but in corrections/detention, also.

            A lot of times, if you show a little respect, you will receive the same, and get much better cooperation from the individual.

            It's also called "being professional".
            Optimistic pessimist: Hope for the best, but expect the worst.

            Jack

            [email protected]

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            • #7
              Jack and Dave are right on the money here. While I would NOT go so far as to say I "treated them as friends" I certainly gave them the same courtesy that I expected from them.

              I had a LOT easier time on both the streets and in the jail than the "Macho I'm THE Man" types! I was known for being fair and honest in my dealings.

              If somebody was acting up, I had no problem in telling them, "in language they COULD understand" to straighten up. Nor did I have any problems in taking it to the next levels if necessary. But just by treating folks with respect, you avoid the need to do this, much of the time!
              6P1 (retired)

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              • #8
                You're right on the money, Don. I usually try to start with the "yes, sir; no, sir" routine, but, like use of force (the voice is part of force, no? ), you may have to "take it to their level" on occasion.

                Most Officers do this without thinking about it after a while.

                Besides, for those that have in-car video, it sure make the BG look even worse when the Officer is polite up until the point of "laying on hands".

                A lot easier to explain to a jury, too....
                Optimistic pessimist: Hope for the best, but expect the worst.

                Jack

                [email protected]

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                • #9
                  I will echo what don, dave, etc. have all said so far, it just goes MUCH smoother if respect is shown on both sides. But, as Don said, using language they will understand when the respect is being misunderstood is also good. I've seen alot of newbies who don't deal too well with people (let alone uncooperative $hiteads) calling them sir and mister whatever when they're spitting and kicking. It just DOES NOT work. In my time in booking i've known MANY of the incoming street arrests by first name. I have no problem talking to them about whats been going on etc, this can also lead to good informants in the future. A little planning for the future is never a bad idea.
                  Nobody ever wants to have to fight, but its a darn good idea for someone to know how.

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                  • #10
                    Having a inteview is one thing and you can get them to talk more by showing some respect. On the street it can be respect or there ball game whatever lanugage they decide to use.
                    Stay safe and watch your back. Survived Katrina. Now a Official member of the Chocolate City Police.

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