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Suppressors with no tax stamp in Texas.

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  • Suppressors with no tax stamp in Texas.

    Suppressors will now be legal in Texas, without having to jump through all the normal hoops.

  • #2
    Now can we get legal SBRs and SBSs?

    Machine guns would be okay- I just can't afford to feed one.

    Comment


    • #3
      Tax stamps for suppressors is a Fed law (1934 National Firearms Act)...so how does that work, exactly? Ohio changed their stance on suppressors (and other "class 3" weapons) a few years ago, making it impossible for Sheriffs to stonewall signing off on them without legitimate reason, but the Federal requirements still apply.
      "He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you."
      -Friedrich Nietzsche

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Bing_Oh View Post
        Tax stamps for suppressors is a Fed law (1934 National Firearms Act)...so how does that work, exactly? Ohio changed their stance on suppressors (and other "class 3" weapons) a few years ago, making it impossible for Sheriffs to stonewall signing off on them without legitimate reason, but the Federal requirements still apply.
        I don't know, but I think it's cool.

        I don't know how Texit will work either, but I like that too...

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Bing_Oh View Post
          Tax stamps for suppressors is a Fed law (1934 National Firearms Act)...so how does that work, exactly? Ohio changed their stance on suppressors (and other "class 3" weapons) a few years ago, making it impossible for Sheriffs to stonewall signing off on them without legitimate reason, but the Federal requirements still apply.
          Well, it'll take balls. I mean, the easiest, most passive thing for Texas DPS to do would be to simply inform Fed LE, whether it's ATF, Marshals, etc, that they'll get zero support: No intelligence, no additional officers from State, County or Municipal to run cordons, etc. No response to calls for assistance or back up. Nothing, they're on their own in matters related to things that aren't illegal in Texas.

          Maybe put out a friendly bulletin, in the interest of public safety, on social media and the local news, stating that Fed LE will be in a particular area to arrest Texans for things that aren't illegal in Texas...

          Comment


          • Aidokea
            Aidokea commented
            Editing a comment
            What if we just deny visas to any ATF people attempting to enter our country from the U.S.S.A.?

          • Krinkiboi2020
            Krinkiboi2020 commented
            Editing a comment
            Baby steps. But, seriously though, I think my suggestion is a reasonable course of action. You're not "interfering" with the Feds, but you're also not responding to their calls for help when they get lit up either...

        • #6
          All of it sounds good, but its still just politics. FFLs, and stores are still bound by federal laws. At most I could see not having to go through the part of having to give your info/finger prints to the local sheriffs office for something that is NFA regulated after these things were passed.

          To me this is on par with the border wall the state is now trying to fund and build. Theyll run into the same legal issues the feds ran into, which is why the federal barrier remains incomplete and spotty in numerous areas.

          Comment


          • Aidokea
            Aidokea commented
            Editing a comment
            We'd like to fence Austin first, to keep the Californians from spreading into Texas...

        • #7
          Originally posted by Levithane View Post
          All of it sounds good, but its still just politics. FFLs, and stores are still bound by federal laws. At most I could see not having to go through the part of having to give your info/finger prints to the local sheriffs office for something that is NFA regulated after these things were passed.

          To me this is on par with the border wall the state is now trying to fund and build. Theyll run into the same legal issues the feds ran into, which is why the federal barrier remains incomplete and spotty in numerous areas.
          Unless the Made in Texas™ cans aren't even sold as 4473 items. If they're treated the same way as firearms accessories like mags, optics, or any of the gazillion other non-firearm things sold in FFLs and sporting goods stores, then the Feds aren't even part of the process.

          Comment


          • Levithane
            Levithane commented
            Editing a comment
            Federal law still supercedes state law, a lot of this is just Texas' way of saying "we're taking a hands off approach to this". Just because it isn't sold as a 4473 item in the state, doesn't mean it isn't a 4473 item under the federal guidelines. Texas could pass legislation allowing us all to own machine guns, but be prepared for the ATF to start a stink about it.

          • tanksoldier
            tanksoldier commented
            Editing a comment
            ...but just like pot and immigration, state and local departments can't enforce federal law.

        • #8
          As long as it or any parts of it what so ever, hasn't ever crossed or never will cross state lines you're probably OK.

          But who wants to be the test case?

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          • #9
            Originally posted by westside popo View Post
            As long as it or any parts of it what so ever, hasn't ever crossed or never will cross state lines you're probably OK.

            But who wants to be the test case?
            The Feds stretched the Interstate Commerce clause past just interstate commerce a loooooong time ago. The argument is that, even is an item doesn't cross state lines, if it has or potentially has an effect on interstate commerce, it falls under Fed jurisdiction. Any test case is going to be fighting long-standing judicial precedence.
            "He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you."
            -Friedrich Nietzsche

            Comment


            • #10
              I for one, do not wish to volunteer to be the test case.

              But I like what Texas is doing...

              Comment

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