Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Released now might be going back....

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Released now might be going back....

    Federal inmates released due to COVID concerns and sent home on home confinement might be sent back to prison. According to the article:
    "Of the 24,000 prisoners who were allowed to go home, 151 – less than 1% – have violated the terms of their home confinement and three have been arrested for new crimes.
    As of mid-April, 4,500 inmates on home confinement would not have qualified if not for the pandemic, although many of them are likely to meet the criteria in the next months. About 2,400 have more than a year left in their sentence, Carvajal told lawmakers.


    A little more than 300 have five years left to serve."

    Now I get these folks committed a crime and should serve the time, but if this is working, many of the have found housing, jobs and schooling, they made change why pull that. If they were all low level offenses and are staying clean why change. And more importantly if it's cost less than why not? Thoughts?

    https://news.yahoo.com/inmates-sent-...100025070.html


    I'd rather be judged by 12 rather carried by 6.

    It should be noted that any and all post that are made are based on my own thought and opinions. And are not related or implied to represent the department I work for.

  • #2
    So I'll state this as a preface, Probation - this is generally for a person who and has not done time in prison. Parole - this is set up for people who have been convicted, done time in prison, and met certain criteria that allows them to serve the remainder of the sentence on supervision not behind bars.

    At the federal level to my knowledge there isn't a parole agency that has officers to supervise people who could be let out early to serve the remainder of the sentence outside of the walls. Theres federal probation/pre trial services, but I don't know if they supervise people how a parole officer would. So essentially the reason the people who have been let out would have to go back is because there isn't a federal agency set up in a parole capacity (at least not to my knowledge). Maybe probation and pre trial services supervises persons who have been convicted and did time, but it would contradict the concept of probation. Im a parole officer at a state level, and generally people do their time with the feds if they have federal charges. If they have state charges after they've done their federal time, the state will likely put them on parole (or at least mine does this).

    Edit: After doing a search there is a United States Parole Commission, however it seems extremely small. It also doesn't look like there is a Federal Parole Officer position either.
    Last edited by Levithane; 05-10-2021, 09:21 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      The national average recidivism rate for felons is around 66%... defined as re-arrested for a new crime within 2 years... and about 49% of parolees have at least one formal parole violation charge... but here less than 1% violated the terms of their release.

      That doesn’t sound fishy to anybody?
      "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

      "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

      Comment


      • moparfan
        moparfan commented
        Editing a comment
        It makes me wonder are those numbers based on state level or federal level crimes. Just curious. I know fools that do one crime will do it again, but curious to see if there is any record of fed vs state crime recidivism.

        It would be great to believe that only 1% of those released early only screwed up again.

      • Levithane
        Levithane commented
        Editing a comment
        I can tell you anecdotally the violation charge statistic is probably higher. They are usually dirty UA violations, failures to be at home at specified time, failure to reside at an approved residence, and failures to report when instructed. Then you have to write up a violation when there is a new criminal charge.

    • #4
      More likely they just haven't been caught or discovered breaking the terms or violating more laws.

      ​​​​​​

      Comment


      • #5
        Originally posted by Levithane View Post
        So I'll state this as a preface, Probation - this is generally for before an individual is convicted and has not done time in prison. Parole - this is set up for people who have been convicted, done time in prison, and met certain criteria that allows them to serve the remainder of the sentence on supervision not behind bars.

        At the federal level to my knowledge there isn't a parole agency that has officers to supervise people who could be let out early to serve the remainder of the sentence outside of the walls. Theres federal probation/pre trial services, but I don't know if they supervise people how a parole officer would. So essentially the reason the people who have been let out would have to go back is because there isn't a federal agency set up in a parole capacity (at least not to my knowledge). Maybe probation and pre trial services supervises persons who have been convicted and did time, but it would contradict the concept of probation. Im a parole officer at a state level, and generally people do their time with the feds if they have federal charges. If they have state charges after they've done their federal time, the state will likely put them on parole (or at least mine does this).

        Edit: After doing a search there is a United States Parole Commission, however it seems extremely small. It also doesn't look like there is a Federal Parole Officer position either.
        What?

        Your state puts people on probation before they are convicted?

        Comment


        • Levithane
          Levithane commented
          Editing a comment
          My fault i misspoke on that part. Was half asleep typing the paragraph.

      • #6
        moparfan Good post. I read the article and it would be nice to see a breakdown of what the released offenders are. White collar, drugs, etc. If the success rate is truly that good and these folks are reintegrating back into society to become tax paying citizens, is that not the ultimate goal? I would love to see a cost savings figure on having these folks on home confinement (no food, medical, lodging expenses). Sounds like a great pilot project and I imagine the savings is tremendous. If these folks violate any of the terms, they should immediately be sent back to prison.

        Comment


        • Levithane
          Levithane commented
          Editing a comment
          If the process they are doing is anywhere similar to what we do, it is notoriously hard to get someone revoked and sent back to prison even if they violate terms. IE the person usually has to commit another serious crime or has to have excessive repeated violations.
          Last edited by Levithane; 05-10-2021, 11:56 AM.

      • #7
        Originally posted by Levithane View Post
        So I'll state this as a preface, Probation - this is generally for a person who and has not done time in prison. Parole - this is set up for people who have been convicted, done time in prison, and met certain criteria that allows them to serve the remainder of the sentence on supervision not behind bars.

        At the federal level to my knowledge there isn't a parole agency that has officers to supervise people who could be let out early to serve the remainder of the sentence outside of the walls. Theres federal probation/pre trial services, but I don't know if they supervise people how a parole officer would. So essentially the reason the people who have been let out would have to go back is because there isn't a federal agency set up in a parole capacity (at least not to my knowledge). Maybe probation and pre trial services supervises persons who have been convicted and did time, but it would contradict the concept of probation. Im a parole officer at a state level, and generally people do their time with the feds if they have federal charges. If they have state charges after they've done their federal time, the state will likely put them on parole (or at least mine does this).

        Edit: After doing a search there is a United States Parole Commission, however it seems extremely small. It also doesn't look like there is a Federal Parole Officer position either.
        In the federal system ALL convictions / sentences result in a 3-7 yr time frame of "Supervised Release" after the completion of their sentence.

        Sentencing sounds something like this : 24 months incarceration followed by 3 yrs supervised release.

        The prisoner on supervised release is supervised by a Federal Probation officer.

        I might add that our local STATE Parole/Probation officer does spot checks on Federal Probation/Supervised Release inmates in our county as a courtesy to the Federal Probation officer .
        Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

        My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

        Comment


        • #8
          Originally posted by tanksoldier View Post
          The national average recidivism rate for felons is around 66%... defined as re-arrested for a new crime within 2 years... and about 49% of parolees have at least one formal parole violation charge... but here less than 1% violated the terms of their release.

          That doesn’t sound fishy to anybody?
          It hasn't been 2 yrs since release due to Covid

          It takes a lot to get violated. NEVER will yo see an probationer/parolee get violated for ONE infraction---absent a new probably VIOLENT crime
          Last edited by Iowa #1603; 05-10-2021, 04:00 PM.
          Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

          My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

          Comment


          • #9
            Originally posted by Iowa #1603 View Post

            It hasn't been 2 yrs since release due to Covid

            It takes a lot to get violated. NEVER will yo see an probationer/parolee get violated for ONE infraction---absent a new probably VIOLENT crime
            One of my jail assignments, between actually working in the jail and the court house, was inmate transport. My county subsidized the jail operation with a contract to hold parole violators waiting for their parole hearings. I’d drive all over the state picking up violators at county jails and bringing them to ours.

            All “new crime” violators were held wherever they got their new charges, so we only got technical violators... the hot UAs, curfew violators, failure to report, etc.

            There were threshold numbers, nobody got popped on their first hot UA, but eventually even technicals will get you violated, at least in Colorado.

            The funny thing is, the state wanted to reduce the number of violations and DOC returns, so they increased the violation thresholds and tightened up the criteria for DOC turnarounds... which slowed business to a trickle for about 2 months, then everybody had time to accumulate enough technicals or new crimes that it was business as usual again.

            The other thing they did was quit calling for 6 month DOC turnarounds to be delivered. Normally a violator would sit in our jail for about 3 weeks, have their hearing and then 2-3 weeks later DOC would call for them and we would deliver them to the halfway house or DOC intake. DOC started having them do their entire 6 months in our jail, calling for them about 2 weeks before their release date to out process . This allowed them to show lower numbers of returns, because they weren’t actually in DOC custody while sitting in our jail.
            "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

            "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

            Comment

            MR300x250 Tablet

            Collapse

            What's Going On

            Collapse

            There are currently 2829 users online. 165 members and 2664 guests.

            Most users ever online was 158,966 at 04:57 AM on 01-16-2021.

            Welcome Ad

            Collapse
            Working...
            X