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  • Informing Officer Of Concealed Carry

    I am a member of a Web forum dedicated to people who have a concealed carry permit.

    Posts were made the other day by some members who live in states that do not require them to notify a police officer that they are carrying a gun if they are stopped for any reason.

    I argued that one should have his carry ticket right on top of his driver's license and hand both them to the officer, whether or not it is a state law.

    One dissenter told a story about how during a traffic stop the officer did inquire whether the driver was armed. The forum member said he told the officer he was, and that he had a concealed carry permit. After showing it to the officer, he said the officer merely handed it back to him saying, "if you don't draw yours, I wont draw mine." The officer then went to his squad car and wrote a ticket for speeding.

    I said that I didn't believe such a story. I found it absolutely ridiculous that an officer - before even running a check on the driver, would turn his back on a citizen carrying a gun. (I find it absolute nonsense that any officer would turn his back on any loaded gun in a citizen's possession.)

    I had at least a dozen forum members pile on me and ridicule my paranoia. Many of them were from the South and said it was normal for people there to be armed while in their car.

    I won't relay any other of the incidents portrayed by the forum members as they ridiculed me for being so worried notifying an officer of my gun while stopped for a traffic infraction.

    Am I being too melodramatic in thinking that the day any officer is so nonchalant about having armed strangers around him is probably the day he doesn't go home again?

  • #2
    I highly doubt the officer "turned his back" on the guy, and if he did that's because he does so on every traffic stop. I treat every traffic stop as if the guy in the car has a gun, meaning I never turn my back.

    The bad guys don't tell us when they have guns, so if someone says they do, and shows me something saying they're allowed to, it actually puts me at ease a little. I still don't drop my guard, but I don't pull him out at gunpoint either. Whether I give something along the same lines (If you don't draw yours I won't draw mine), or take the gun for the remainder of the stop, really depends on my gut feeling and the stop.

    That's how I handle them, others do it other ways. But, coming from the guy on the other side of the window, the best thing is to tell them you have a CCW and have it on you, tell them where it is, and then let the LEO dictate what happens next.

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    • #3
      "Armed citizens" are no threat to us. Armed criminals are. Nuff said.
      As far as "rights" are concerned; I look at them this way... I don't tell you what church to go to, and you don't tell me what kind of firearm I can own...

      Comment


      • #4
        True enough that people in the south do have a tendancy of carry guns more, that doesnt mean that a cop is going to turn his back and laugh it off. Just becasue you say your someone with the photo ID doesnt always mean YOU ARE...ever here of ID theft and fake ID's?

        I think any cop that turns and walks to his car Knowing that theres a gun, is a dead man walking if ever there was one.
        True enough criminals doent say that they have one, and not everyone tells the cop. every stop is treated as a felony until further notice with my LEO friends, and I, due to the nature of my work pretty much do the same with people I meet. I have actully be told by my cop riends that I act more like a cop then alot of rookies.

        not paranoia, life on the streets.
        ‘Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go.’
        Oscar Wilde

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        • #5
          If I see the gun and it is within reach, I usually ask for it and check stolen and return it unloaded at end of stop.

          If it is tucked away and it not mentioned, I usually don't ask if they have a gun in the car UNLESS there is an issue to make me concerned.

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          • #6
            I live in a State where it isn't unusuual for a driver to be armed. There is no requirement to show a CCW permit.

            If a guy DID show me his permit, I wouldn't worry about him so much. Never been a case here of a licensed citizen shooting a cop. So, I would turn my back on him.

            If he was going to shoot me, he'd shoot me, not show me a license.
            "Say hal-lo to my leetle frahnd!"

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            • #7
              Unfortunately there are officers/deputies/troopers that do become complacent with "routine traffic stops". I personally treat everyone the same and take precautions with the "soccer moms" as well as the "dirtbags" (not saying that soccer moms can't be dirtbags and vice versa). It is possible that the forum members story is true but lets hope he's lying.
              "Fast is fine, but accuracy is everything!"-Wyatt Earp

              "You never know when crazy will show up!"-Irishdep

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              • #8
                Originally posted by samb View Post
                "if you don't draw yours, I wont draw mine." The officer then went to his squad car and wrote a ticket for speeding.

                I said that I didn't believe such a story. I found it absolutely ridiculous that an officer - before even running a check on the driver, would turn his back on a citizen carrying a gun. (I find it absolute nonsense that any officer would turn his back on any loaded gun in a citizen's possession.)

                I had at least a dozen forum members pile on me and ridicule my paranoia. Many of them were from the South and said it was normal for people there to be armed while in their car.


                Am I being too melodramatic in thinking that the day any officer is so nonchalant about having armed strangers around him is probably the day he doesn't go home again?
                There are officers that would turn their back on a traffic stop. These officers have become complacent and comfortable in their jobs due to not being involved in a lot of high stress incidents. That being said, I usually don't ask if there is a weapon in the car. As I approach a car, the only thing I'm looking for is #######. (If the stop doesn't feel right, then the violator has to get out of his car and walk back to me. I must see his hands the entire time and he has to stop at the front of my car). After I approach the car, if the violator decides to show me a permit, then I ask him for the location of the weapon. I then tell him to keep his hands on the steering wheel for the duration of the stop. To get a permit, one has to go through a thorough background check. They're not gonna risk their CCW on a traffic stop. But everyone is dangerous. You never know who has a felony warrant and doesn't want to go back to jail.

                A man should never be ashamed to own that he has been in the wrong, which is but saying... that he is wiser today than yesterday. Jonathan Swift 1667-1745

                It's only a conspiracy when your party is not in power.

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                • #9
                  ccw

                  As a retired cop i will tell you i never turned my back on a subject
                  here in NH a franconia cop turned his back on a know pos was killed by that pos-shot in the back
                  as a bea i never turn my back on anyone during an investigation or rearrest

                  as a retired cop who travels all over the u.s. when i am pulled over(i still have a lead foot)i always have my license, my reg,my insurance and my retired id together and inform the officer that i am armed and the location of the weapon with both hands on the steering wheel until he tells me to move

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                  • #10
                    Guns are very common place in the south, GA, TN and FL etc... I worked a good portion of I-75 in GA and encountered many people carrying while traveling and it amazed me just how many told me they had a gun when they had no legal requirement to and I told them just how much I appreciated them doing so.

                    Every so often it actually was the deciding factor to me whether I wrote a ticket, warning or just left them go with a verbal.
                    "I neither approve or blame. I merely relate."- Voltaire

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by irishdep View Post
                      Unfortunately there are officers/deputies/troopers that do become complacent with "routine traffic stops". I personally treat everyone the same and take precautions with the "soccer moms" as well as the "dirtbags" (not saying that soccer moms can't be dirtbags and vice versa). It is possible that the forum members story is true but lets hope he's lying.

                      You're right, of couse, about being vigilant. But I don't want to live my life like that. I think it leads to major psychological problems as well as burn-out problems and affects home life.

                      I trust my instincts enough to assume a guy who tells you he's armed isn't going to forewarn you. But that's just me. I have a pretty well developed internal warning system about such things, and I trust it.

                      I went throught the extreme paranoia stage, and paid the price. I'm not underselling vigilance, but living my life in constant "stage 2" of readiness just isn't my cup of tea. I'll take my chances of getting shot, I guess. Mathematically, those chances are much lower as a cop than as a convenience or liqour store worker.
                      "Say hal-lo to my leetle frahnd!"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Even a cop cannot constantly distrust everyone and keep their back up against a wall their entire life; eventually they will need to turn their back on someone. Since it is their life, it is their judgement call whether or not they trust someone enough to turn around.

                        I do think you are smart to hand over your permit along with your DL, instead of waiting for the cop to discover your gun himself. I think that falls under "a simple little thing so I don't get shot" more than it falls under "paranoia."

                        But if everyone else doesn't want to and the law doesn't make them, that is their choice.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Fëanor View Post
                          Even a cop cannot constantly distrust everyone and keep their back up against a wall their entire life; eventually they will need to turn their back on someone. Since it is their life, it is their judgement call whether or not they trust someone enough to turn around.

                          I do think you are smart to hand over your permit along with your DL, instead of waiting for the cop to discover your gun himself. I think that falls under "a simple little thing so I don't get shot" more than it falls under "paranoia."

                          But if everyone else doesn't want to and the law doesn't make them, that is their choice.
                          I agree.

                          Many citizens over the years have been hurt because they didn't use commonsense. They figured they had their 'rights' and never thought about the situation from the officer's point of view, his obligation to use due caution for his own safety.

                          The answers I received in this discussion do surprise me in regard to how common a happenstance it is for you officers to find people carrying guns, I guess my first 60+ years of living in Chicago and the surrounding Metro area has conditioned my mind to always expect a police officer to react a certain way toward finding someone with a gun. I'm sure I hardly have to tell you what the consequence of 'carrying' anywhere in Illinois would be. This long standing attitude there toward guns has made the police officers there one-minded on the subject of civilians carrying a gun. It also conditions the mind of an honest ex-Illinoisan to still feel a bit 'guilty' and nervous about carrying in the presence of a police officer in Indiana, although the 'carry' is totally legal.

                          Thanks for your input. I think this discussion will allow me to feel a bit more at ease if I ever am stopped for a traffic violation and have to hand over my carry permit with my driver license.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            In TX, if you have the permit, you know:
                            - If you're carrying, you HAVE to give your permit to the LEO immediately and tell him you're carrying.
                            - If you're not, you don't have to - BUT PLEASE DO ANYWAY. We will find out when we run you and wonder why we're not holding your permit also.

                            I had this happen a few days ago: 50-something woman and her 20-something daughter. While I'm sitting in the car writing the warning, dispatch informs me of a CHL on the driver. I approached with my hand on my gun and asked her if she had a weapon in the car. She had no idea about any of it. Turns out, the dispatcher read me her information, but also part of someone else's.
                            Was I on high alert? Yes. Did I order her out at gunpoint? Of course not. As long as I was watching both their hands, I was safe. No need to go Robocop.
                            If trees could scream, would we be so cavalier about cutting them down? We might, if they screamed all the time, for no good reason.

                            ---Jack Handey

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                            • #15
                              In Georgia (except, perhaps for the metropolitan areas) we LEOs are pretty tolerant of guns and used to folks carrying them. You can carry one in plain view without a license, or you can carry one in your glove compartment or center console without a license.

                              My sheriff, and I agree, encourages law-abiding citizens to carry a weapon (legally, of course.)

                              When we started Courthouse Security measures using a metal detector, dozens of old guys came in with pistols they'd been carrying for years and simply forgot about...it was like pocket knives, which are also banned. We asked them to take them back to their cars and secure them, which they did. Now we've got lockers where people with permits can store their handguns and knives until they leave the courthouse.

                              Never yet arrested anyone for carrying. Always, these have been old guys who mean no trouble, and cheerfully comply with our requests.
                              "Say hal-lo to my leetle frahnd!"

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