Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Your Department’s Fitness policy

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Your Department’s Fitness policy

    Do any of y’all have a department that allows you to workout on duty? I am trying to put something together to present to the admin staff about allowing us 30-60 minutes per shift to workout. Just curious if anyone had a policy in place that would help me out. Thanks!

  • #2
    What are we...firefighters?

    I don't know the composition or policies of your department, but my department pays us for meal breaks because we're subject to responding to calls while on break because of staffing limitations. I can't imagine admin letting us work out on duty. It's not like you can work out in uniform and getting a decent workout in would require transitioning between workout apparel and uniform. Maybe if you're a huge department with lots of staffing coverage that would be realistic, but most LEO's in the US work for small agencies where it pretty unlikely.
    "He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you."
    -Friedrich Nietzsche

    Comment


    • #3
      My agency allows 1 hour per duty day.

      I would do an internet search for law enforcement health & fitness polices. I'm sure you can find various agency policies online.

      How to implement a department-wide health, fitness program
      https://www.police1.com/pulse-of-pol...IQItMIHQLsvEt/

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't mean to be Mr. Doom & Gloom but -

        Here are the objections the administration will raise. Be prepared to come up with good responses.

        Working out on duty will eventually result in someone being injured. Because the injury occurred while on duty, it will be a worker’s comp matter. This will result in medical bills, lost time from work, and possibly disability retirements, all which must be paid for by the employer. You need to demonstrate that the resulting increase in physical fitness will create a commensurate decrease in work related heart, hypertension and orthopedic claims , the savings from which will more than cover your fitness program. (Hint – that’s going to be hard if not impossible to do.)

        Assuming you are working an 8 hour shift, 30 to 60 minutes a day reduces service to the public by 6.25% to 12.5% per day. What will replace it? In this anti-police culture, how will you tell the public that their level of safety is being cut so the cops can go work out on the city’s dime? As an alternative, you can propose that this be done on overtime but again, you will bee seeking a budget change proposal for n increase in wages by (figuring for time and a half and adding in hidden benefits such as workers comp insurance and other things negotiated in your union contract) around 7.5% to 12%. Again, good luck with that one.

        In order to sell this, your program will more than likely need to be a union contract issue, where the union gives up something of value to get something of equal value.

        Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

        Comment


        • #5
          I worked with a guy who got massively fat- like he would have sweat rolling down his face just walking from the refrigerated locker room into the air-conditioned squad room. His uncle was our captain, and the captain ordered the fat slob to work out an hour a day while on duty.

          The rest of us? Not so much...

          Comment


          • #6
            We have a pilot program being tested that allows each officer up to 1 hour per week for an on-duty workout, to be taken either at the start or end of their scheduled shift. The workout has to be done at the department-provided workout facility, and the officer must monitor radio traffic in the event they're needed for something critical.

            It's non-mandatory and not many seem to be taking advantage of it. I agree with the idea of compensated workout time -- not only because our job can be physically demanding, but also because of the well-documented positive impact regular exercise has on both general and mental health. But it's still a hard sell to even those departments, like mine, that are generally supportive of the idea.

            Comment


            • Hopeful_vet
              Hopeful_vet commented
              Editing a comment
              Where do you work? This sounds very similar to ours.

          • #7
            Shower and clean up part of that time?

            Comment


            • #8
              Not a police department, but Guard technicians got 3 hours per week to work out... because their jobs depended on their National Guard status, which depended on their ability to pass a fitness test.

              Many departments have fitness programs, few make them mandatory and even fewer make employment conditional on meeting a fitness standard.

              Thats probably the only way you’ll get the department to spring for paying you to work out. ...and that comes with problems of its own.

              Maybe instead, go for a fitness incentive. My town, all employees (not just cops) who meet health and fitness goals set each year get an extra 5 days PTO.

              Working out on duty will eventually result in someone being injured.
              Irrelevant. Firefighters work out on duty. Use whatever rules they use.

              Assuming you are working an 8 hour shift, 30 to 60 minutes a day reduces service to the public by 6.25% to 12.5% per day.
              Thats a valid objection. Firefighters generally respond to calls for service, they usually don’t have a patrol and deterrence function.
              Last edited by tanksoldier; 01-03-2021, 07:33 PM.
              "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

              "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

              Comment


              • #9
                Not irrelevant. Very important and doesn’t equate. There is no fitness requirement after hire, ergo, no need to provide workout time and incur workman's comp injuries the taxpayer has to fund.

                Perhaps this is another area of management you don’t have much experience in...

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
                  Not irrelevant.
                  It’s not a valid objection to being paid for workout time on duty. There’s already a solution for other employees who work out on the clock.

                  Perhaps this is another area of management you don’t have much experience in...
                  Perhaps, perhaps not...

                  ....interestingly, you supposedly have vast amounts of experience interacting with human beings, but still dink it up every time you post.
                  Last edited by tanksoldier; 01-03-2021, 07:37 PM.
                  "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                  "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Our department is similar to orange bottles. We are allowed one hour paid workout per week. This hour is supposed to account for any breaks you would normally take during your work shift though. I have no idea how they could enforce this as we don’t clock out or call out for breaks, just grab a drink or dinner when the calls slow. This is a fairly new policy and not many people have taken advantage of it as it’s to be used during your work shift, which leaves you feeling like your screwing your shift over. My department is approximately 350-400 sworn depending on staffing levels just for 10-14. Plus I work for a department that contracts out to multiple cities, some precincts have nice gyms some don’t. The main building has a nice gym but for some precincts this is 20 mins away and wouldn’t make sense to workout there if you only have an hour.

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      FWIW, 20 years ago in my agency, fitness standards were established that varied depending upon age and sex. If you passed, you got to keep your job. You also got an extra $130 per month in your paycheck. If you failed, you were given a chance to remediate (get back in shape) and after a certain window were tested again. If you failed a second time, you were terminated. Officers who were hired prior to the implementation of these standards (and already had permanent civil service status) were grandfathered, not required to comply and did not have to test. However, if they did and passed, they got the $130 per month, but nothing happened to them if they failed.

                      The thought here was by implementing this program, fitness would be maintained on a year-round basis. In turn, increased fitness would minimize workers comp claims and disability retirement costs due to heart, hypertension and ortho injuries, which were the biggest of our industrial injury costs. It was envisioned that such a program would create a tremendous saving for the department in workers compensation and disability retirement costs.

                      The reality was, the majority of officers made little effort to stay in shape except for the few months prior to when they were scheduled to test. Then, they would scramble to try and get back in shape in order to meet the testing standards. It was then that we would get a spike in costly, disabling physical fitness maintenance injuries. Because maintaining physical fitness was a mandated work requirement, these injuries were deemed to be work related and compensable under workers compensation and disability retirement laws. The resulting workers comp and disability retirement costs far exceeded any dollar amount the department envisioned saving under the mandatory fitness program and it was abandoned.

                      Again, this was a lesson in be careful what you wish for.


                      Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        There was an article (I think on this site) within the last couple of years about an officer who sued his department for an injury he received while working out on duty, claiming that the city was negligent for not properly training him in work-out techniques.

                        Comment


                        • L-1
                          L-1 commented
                          Editing a comment
                          We can't sue for stuff like that in California. It's just a work related injury and a workers com claim. If you can show intentional mployer negligence it may double your permanent disability award, but that's it.

                      • #14
                        Originally posted by just joe View Post
                        There was an article (I think on this site) within the last couple of years about an officer who sued his department for an injury he received while working out on duty, claiming that the city was negligent for not properly training him in work-out techniques.
                        My department gets around this by scheduling an appointment with a certified trainer upon hire. The employee meets with the trainer, who assesses the person's basic fitness level and discusses exercise/fitness goals. Then, in a follow-up meeting, the trainer provides a written plan and demonstrates proper techniques to follow the plan. The employee has the option of meeting with the trainer on an annual basis, at no charge, to review and/or modify the plan. At face value, it seems like a nice way for the department to support health maintenance...but I'm jaded enough to believe that it's also a way for them to absolve themselves of liability in the event of a workout-related injury.

                        All that being said, I will admit that our department is very flexible when people get injured, whether it was on duty or off. We've had several people on light duty for the better part of a year, even when the injury occurred during an off-duty workout.

                        A final thought -- I'm a big fan of the 'carrot' method of encouraging ongoing health. I really like the idea of financial incentives for maintaining certain fitness levels and wish our department had something like that in place.

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          You guys are really depressing me. My department wouldn't even provide space for free government-surplus gym equipment without demanding contract concessions from us in exchange...
                          "He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you."
                          -Friedrich Nietzsche

                          Comment

                          MR300x250 Tablet

                          Collapse

                          What's Going On

                          Collapse

                          There are currently 2975 users online. 120 members and 2855 guests.

                          Most users ever online was 158,966 at 04:57 AM on 01-16-2021.

                          Welcome Ad

                          Collapse
                          Working...
                          X