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First transgender officer on KC's police force

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  • First transgender officer on KC's police force

    I searched and didn't see this one already posted.

    Enjoy.....


    First transgender officer on KC's police force looks to the future
    Born as David, Jessica changed her life last year and now awaits a sex-change operation.


    One sign of her new life: Jessica tweezes her eyebrows. And every day she takes a handful of hormones as her body adjusts to living as a woman. Her co-workers are slowly getting used to working with a transgender police officer.
    One sign of her new life: Jessica tweezes her eyebrows. And every day she takes a handful of hormones as her body adjusts to living as a woman. Her co-workers are slowly getting used to working with a transgender police officer.
    On the job, Jessica recently responded to a disturbance call. She says her job productivity has improved because she is “not struggling with that inner voice anymore.” A KC police officer since 1996, Jessica now is allowed to dress according to women’s police uniform standards.


    The Kansas City Police Department hired him in 1996. A year later, he remarried.

    Then a back injury knocked him out of work for months, giving him time to dwell on his future.

    I’m not getting any younger, he told himself, and I haven’t had the life I wanted.

    A turning point

    On the Internet, David finally discovered a name for the internal hell he’d been living: gender identity disorder. The solution was daunting: expensive female hormones and even more expensive and extreme surgery.

    Even so, he daydreamed about living as a woman and sought a way out of his marriage. He committed adultery — openly. His wife forgave him, so he cheated again.

    Divorce did not solve anything. He felt incredible guilt for hurting his second wife. Overall, he felt worse than ever.

    He thought about his mom, who died 15 years earlier of cancer. He wanted to join her.

    One day, David sat in the shower, crying, until the water turned cold. He stepped out, pulled on his pajamas and sat on the bed with his duty handgun and a pen and paper. He wanted to write a farewell letter to his father, but no words came. How could he explain?

    Crying, he picked up the handgun.

    I’m done, he thought. I don’t know how to deal with this.

    But what would his death do to his father, siblings and other relatives? He didn’t want to hurt them. Pursuing life as a woman trumped death, despite all the risks, he figured. He slid the gun into his nightstand.

    Searching the Internet, he found a British therapist who handled gender identity issues. They talked for months, until David found a local therapist.

    David tested the waters at work by confiding his plans to another officer.

    “Can’t you just be gay?” the officer responded.

    Telling the boss

    Last year, David decided to come out — a necessary step before taking pills to develop secondary female characteristics such as breasts.

    He told his second ex-wife and saw relief flood her eyes, as if realizing it was not her fault.

    The next hurdle: the Kansas City Police Department.

    He pondered how to tell his bosses that the man they hired 10 years earlier intended to morph into a woman. He chose Deputy Chief Rachel Whipple, the only female deputy of five.

    Sensing his stress, Whipple told him to take a deep breath.

    “I don’t know how to say this,” David started, “but I’m a male-to-female transsexual.”

    “OK, let’s talk about it,” Whipple answered. “I’ll take it to the chief, and you’ll need to let your chain of command know.”

    David left in awe. Wow, he thought. This is going better than I expected.

    Within a few days, television crews sought interviews. David declined. He felt somewhat betrayed by the way his private news traveled faster than if he had posted it on the Internet.

    Still, he was glad to still be employed. He knew other transgenders who were not as fortunate.

    Across America

    In recent years transgender police officers have made news in multiple cities, including Philadelphia, Houston, Cincinnati and Oklahoma City.

    One filed a civil rights complaint alleging her department was trying to force her to quit.

    As opposed to decades ago, however, today’s bosses generally are more accepting and supportive of transgender employees, says Houston lawyer Phyllis Randolph Frye, who has been fighting the transgender rights battle for 30 years.

    Just how many transgender police officers exist nationwide remains a mystery, though.

    The Star’s Tony Rizzo contributed to this report. To reach Christine Vendel, call 816-234-4438 or send e-mail to [email protected].

  • #2
    Being gay is one thing, but doesn't being transgender mean you have some mental issues? How did he pass the psych eval?

    Comment


    • #3
      Aside from the gender disorder --what about the suicidel tendencies? Having this person armed makes her a danger to herself.
      Reality is only a perception

      Comment


      • #4
        What's next?
        "I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get around in places where it's spoken."

        Comment


        • #5
          We have a 'shemale' at Disney...Now that he's a 'she' 'it 'slacks off more...so there was like taking a step backward for him/her...At least it's not in my area anymore...
          "come on vacation, leave on probation"

          Comment


          • #6
            Now the gays; they hold there own, back you all the way if need be.. but not the transgender 'girl'
            "come on vacation, leave on probation"

            Comment


            • #7
              The fact is, that type of person has psychological problems. Hopefully nothing bad will happen.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by michiganDT View Post
                Being gay is one thing, but doesn't being transgender mean you have some mental issues? How did he pass the psych eval?
                It wasn't that long ago that homosexuality was regarded as a "mental issue." If David/Jessica was a good officer before, there's no reason why David/Jessica won't be a good officer now. The worst possible approach is to make a big deal out of it and call attention to something that really isn't anyone else's business.

                I was a cop when gay cops started "coming out." One of them was my sergeant, who was extremely well respected. A few people tried to make a big deal out of his sexual preference in order to condemn him, but they usually shut down when they were asked if they would like to provide details on their own sexual partners and favorite bedroom activities. In the end, most everyone came to the realization that this was the same guy we had been working with for 20 years, and this latest revelation meant pretty close to nothing.
                Tim Dees, now writing as a plain old forum member, his superpowers lost to an encounter with gold kryptonite.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I could careless about what this individual wants as long as when the feces hits the rotating blade I see them helping not cowering on the pavement.
                  Sometimes, doing the right thing means p***ing off the bosses.

                  "And shepherds we shall be, for thee my lord for thee."

                  Originally posted by dontknowwhy
                  I still think troopers and deputies who work in the middle of no where with essentially no back up are the 'men among men' of the LEO world.
                  Originally posted by weinerdog2000
                  as far as your social experiment, if we cant film you then you cant film us, we will arrest you for obstruction of our freedom.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm concerned about the suicidal episode this person had but at the same time it looks like it was directly linked to their gender confusion and the internal struggle they were dealing with. Now that the problem is no longer internalized and the person has reconciled it and got it off their chest I think they will be fine. Being open and honest about the things eating at you is important. I think this is a prime example of why people should talk to their loved ones and respected friends about their feelings instead of keeping it hidden. I lost a family member to suicide because they didn't confide in us.

                    It's refreshing to see that there are people who can appreciate the good work of GLTB people in our nation though. I won't lie; I would be very uneasy at first working around someone like that but I wouldn't let it dominate my view of that person or their work.
                    -I don't feel you honor someone by creating a physical gesture (the salute). You honor them by holding them in memory and, in law enforcement, proceeding in vigilant, ethical police work. You honor this country or deceased soldiers or whatever you're honoring when you salute a flag by thinking, feeling, and continuing a life of freedom.

                    --ArkansasRed24

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Whatever floats their boat....


                      As long as he/she is a good officer (I assume the gender change shouldn't affect that) then it shouldn't really matter. I don't really understand the feeling of gender confusion but I can believe it's a legitimate problem and not something to be written off as a psych case.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Tim Dees View Post
                        It wasn't that long ago that homosexuality was regarded as a "mental issue." If David/Jessica was a good officer before, there's no reason why David/Jessica won't be a good officer now. The worst possible approach is to make a big deal out of it and call attention to something that really isn't anyone else's business.

                        I was a cop when gay cops started "coming out." One of them was my sergeant, who was extremely well respected. A few people tried to make a big deal out of his sexual preference in order to condemn him, but they usually shut down when they were asked if they would like to provide details on their own sexual partners and favorite bedroom activities. In the end, most everyone came to the realization that this was the same guy we had been working with for 20 years, and this latest revelation meant pretty close to nothing.

                        Yea, but there is a difference between liking someone of the same sex, and wanting to have your genitalia cut off. I was mostly referring to his suicidal episode when I mentioned the psych eval.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well said, Tim. I don't think that this is a mental problem. Just consider yourself lucky that it's not something you have to deal with. As long as this person has dealt with the feelings that made him (at the time) suicidal, and (now) she's been psychologically cleared to continue working, she should be judged based on her ability to do the job and nothing else.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            One person forced to live a lie causes untold pain to many other people. Having gender disorder is as "mental" as puberty and menopause.

                            If you'd like some insight, read "As Nature Made Him," it's a pretty devastating account of someone forced to live as a girl, when he was really a boy.

                            http://www.amazon.com/As-Nature-Made.../dp/0060192119

                            By the way, she's not the first police officer to go thru this...just the first for this department.
                            Molly Weasley makes Chuck Norris eat his vegetables.

                            sigpic

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              OK, so which bathroom or locker room does Jessica/David use?
                              The liberal politician has the only job where they go to the office to work for everyone but those who pay their salary.

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