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  • Fine for running a red?

    I'm 17, I live in Commerce City, Colorado and the other day I ran a red. I was going at a decent speed, and as I was about 50 ft away from the intersection the light turned yellow and at that point I didn't want to slam on my brakes in order to not run a red so I kept going, and halfway through the intersection the light turned red. I didn't think much of it at first, but then a motorcycle cop apparently saw me and turned his lights on as he followed me. I pulled over, gave him everything, and he gave me a ticket.

    The actual ticket or whatever is supposed to arrive in the mail, and I either pay the fine, or go to court to try and fight it. I don't really want to go to court, but I think I might have to regardless. If not, I will go only if the ticket stays at 4 points (which seemed steep to me. I asked a DENVER cop about my ticket and he said he usually gives out 2 point tickets for that sort of thing). If the ticket does stay at 4, my insurance is sure to spike, and I really can't afford to have that happen...

    Also, my main question is how much the fine will be. I have an idea but it's probably not even close to the real number. Realistically, without being soft on myself, I think it'll be around $400 since my city considers it to be a 4-point violation.

    Any thoughts, suggestions, advice, etc.? (Besides "Don't run a red light!!" Believe me, I learned my lesson)

  • #2
    I'm pretty sure that red light violations are always four points in Colorado. Red light violations by themselves don't usually require a court appearance. But if you are 17 you will have to appear and will have to bring a parent. I don’t know what the fines are like in Combat, er… I mean Commerce City, but I would be very surprised if the fine was over $100.

    If you are being honest, and the light really did in fact not turn red until after you had completely entered the intersection, you should fight it.

    When the light turned yellow did you “floor it” to try and get through? Some officers might try to write you for careless or something, but they really shouldn’t write for red light violations unless you were still outside of the intersection when the light turned red. (Keep in mind that when you are driving under the light looking up at it, your perception of your relationship to the intersection/ red light might not be correct).

    If you think you are guilty, just take your lumps, live and learn.

    P.S. This should really go over to the "ask a cop" section.
    Last edited by cc_chiller; 06-03-2007, 03:04 AM.
    "There are two sides to every story.... mine and wrong." ~Stephen Colbert

    "Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you walk into an open sewer and die." ~ Mel Brooks

    "Hope for the Best. Expect the worst. Life is a play. We're unrehearsed."~ Mel Brooks

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    • #3
      I was kind of asking this as a general question because I thought some people here would have experience with red light tickets, not just cops, but thanks anyways for your response.

      I am pretty guilty of this red light, but it'd be nice if they went soft on me. My friend said I could talk to the D.A. and tell them that I'm a good kid, get good grades, never get in trouble, never been in an accident, and this is my first ever traffic violation, and that 4 points is a lot, but if that doesn't work, I'll take what the judge gives me, since I did **** up.

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      • #4
        Don't work CO, so I don't know, but I have a question for a CO cop. Is the poster saying that y'all get to determine how many points are attached to the ticket???????? I assumed, wrong I suppose, that the state sets points for each violation...
        sigpic

        I don't agree with your opinion, but I respect its straightforwardness in terms of wrongness.

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        • #5
          IN NY in the middle of a snow storm my sister passed a green light at a speed that was prudent for the sever weather conditions. While crossing the large intersection the light turned yellow then red. She went to traffic court to avoid the points and voice her opinion on the absurdity due to the weather. She had to attend drivers ed to get it dropped.
          Reality is only a perception

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          • #6
            Here's the deal- the ticket (from the Commerce City cop) says "failing to stop at a red light" is 4 points. I asked a Denver cop how many points it is in Denver and he said 2. Maybe it says 4 on the ticket, and then somehow they drop it to 2 when all is said and done.

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            • #7
              Running a Red

              Originally posted by xstreamblu View Post
              Here's the deal- the ticket (from the Commerce City cop) says "failing to stop at a red light" is 4 points. I asked a Denver cop how many points it is in Denver and he said 2. Maybe it says 4 on the ticket, and then somehow they drop it to 2 when all is said and done.
              I certaintly can't speak for Colorado, but in Alabama, points are assessed against your license per a published point schedule. In Alabama, that schedule is administered by the Department of Public Safety. In other states, it would be the state's Department of Motor Vehicles. The point I am making here is that the number of points for running a red light, speeding, etc, should be the same, anywhere in a given state. I suggest you check into this with the court you're supposed to appear in. A simple phone call to the Court Clerk, or Colorado Dept of Motor Vehicles should provide you with information concerning points on your license.

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              • #8
                Hmm..I don't really have an issue with it, seeing as both cops see the offense as a 4 point violation. The Denver cop just said that I can try to fight it, seeing as it's my first traffic violation, and that it is very possible the D.A. can help me make it into a "careless driving" violation and drop to a 2-pointer.

                Anyways, thank for all of your replies!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by xstreamblu View Post
                  Here's the deal- the ticket (from the Commerce City cop) says "failing to stop at a red light" is 4 points. I asked a Denver cop how many points it is in Denver and he said 2. Maybe it says 4 on the ticket, and then somehow they drop it to 2 when all is said and done.
                  Originally posted by Smurfette_76 View Post
                  Don't work CO, so I don't know, but I have a question for a CO cop. Is the poster saying that y'all get to determine how many points are attached to the ticket???????? I assumed, wrong I suppose, that the state sets points for each violation...
                  I'm about 99% sure that the points are set by the state department of revenue and should be standard statewide. Red light violations should always be four points. Often the court or the DOR can reduce the points if you met certain criteria.

                  I don't know why a DPD officer would say that a red light violation was two points. Although the City and County of Denver seems to think and act like it is its own state sometimes... so maybe they do something different there.
                  "There are two sides to every story.... mine and wrong." ~Stephen Colbert

                  "Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you walk into an open sewer and die." ~ Mel Brooks

                  "Hope for the Best. Expect the worst. Life is a play. We're unrehearsed."~ Mel Brooks

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by xstreamblu View Post
                    I'm 17, I live in Commerce City, Colorado and the other day I ran a red. I was going at a decent speed, and as I was about 50 ft away from the intersection the light turned yellow and at that point I didn't want to slam on my brakes in order to not run a red so I kept going, and halfway through the intersection the light turned red. I didn't think much of it at first, but then a motorcycle cop apparently saw me and turned his lights on as he followed me. I pulled over, gave him everything, and he gave me a ticket.

                    The actual ticket or whatever is supposed to arrive in the mail, and I either pay the fine, or go to court to try and fight it. I don't really want to go to court, but I think I might have to regardless. If not, I will go only if the ticket stays at 4 points (which seemed steep to me. I asked a DENVER cop about my ticket and he said he usually gives out 2 point tickets for that sort of thing). If the ticket does stay at 4, my insurance is sure to spike, and I really can't afford to have that happen...

                    Also, my main question is how much the fine will be. I have an idea but it's probably not even close to the real number. Realistically, without being soft on myself, I think it'll be around $400 since my city considers it to be a 4-point violation.

                    Any thoughts, suggestions, advice, etc.? (Besides "Don't run a red light!!" Believe me, I learned my lesson)

                    The way I look at it and act on it is this; if you're already committed to going through the intersection as in you're going fast with traffic and it turns red or you go into it when it turns yellow and then it suddenly turns red then I won't bother you. I'm not going to ask someone to come to a screeching halt to stop at a redlight, BUT if you roll into it and hit a car or cause one to hit you then I'll write a ticket along with the report. If no harm is done then I don't really care.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      http://www.springsgov.com/Page.asp?NavID=3587

                      At most intersections there will either be a crosswalk, a solid white line (stop bar) or both across the lanes. When both are present, the stop bar will be the closest line and that is the point at which a vehicle must be over when the light turns red in order to not be a red light violation. In the absence of the stop bar, then the crosswalk becomes the point. In the absence of either, an imaginary line connecting the closest curb line of the cross street then becomes the point of no return. Often times, drivers fail to recognize where their vehicle is when the light turns red and feel that they were in the intersection at the time the light cycles from yellow to red. The most effective way to avoid running a red light is to anticipate the light cycle and prepare to stop when the light turns yellow. A red light violation carries a $130.00 fine and 4 points assessed against the driver’s license.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ArkansasFan24 View Post
                        The way I look at it and act on it is this; if you're already committed to going through the intersection as in you're going fast with traffic and it turns red or you go into it when it turns yellow and then it suddenly turns red then I won't bother you. I'm not going to ask someone to come to a screeching halt to stop at a redlight, BUT if you roll into it and hit a car or cause one to hit you then I'll write a ticket along with the report. If no harm is done then I don't really care.
                        Wow I wish the cop that pulled me over was like you.

                        He didn't seem to like to talk- I was ready to say "Good afternoon officer" but right when he got to my window he was like "I pulled you over for running a red."

                        I guess he's the uptight kind of cop...a warning would've been enough for me, but now it's just a hassle paying a fine and court fees, plus keeping my mom from going to work for a day. Like I said, I definitely learned my lesson.

                        Originally posted by xraodcop View Post
                        http://www.springsgov.com/Page.asp?NavID=3587
                        A red light violation carries a $130.00 fine and 4 points assessed against the driver’s license.
                        Thanks for this..now I know approximately how much this will cost. My friend said that court fees are different for every case..he went to court and before it was his turn, the dude before him had an attitude with the judge so he got hit with $80 in court fees, while my friend only got $25. Hmm

                        I have another question
                        Is it true that at the end of the month, cops are more prone to pull people over because supposedly cops are supposed to have written a certain amount of tickets by the end of the month?Someone confirm or bust this myth please.
                        Last edited by xstreamblu; 06-04-2007, 02:14 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by xstreamblu;891167
                          I have another question
                          [B
                          Is it true that at the end of the month, cops are more prone to pull people over because supposedly cops are supposed to have written a certain amount of tickets by the end of the month?[/B]Someone confirm or bust this myth please.
                          There is a whole big thread about "quotas" in the ask-a-cop section (I think in the traffic enforcement sub-section). Check that out if you want.

                          In many states "quotas" are illegal. In Colorado, there are several agencies I know of where officers are required to average a certain number of tickets or traffic stops each month. They are never officially called quotas though... usually called a "goal" or “performance measure” or something like that.

                          I don't know for sure, but I would guess that CCPD motor cops do have some kind of ticket goal or quota. Keep in mind that a traffic cop's job is just that, traffic enforcement. Having a "quota" is just one way of ensuring he is actually doing his job and not just goofing off all day. If you are planning on trying to use the “quota defense” in court, I would advise against it… it will probably just make the judge mad.
                          "There are two sides to every story.... mine and wrong." ~Stephen Colbert

                          "Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you walk into an open sewer and die." ~ Mel Brooks

                          "Hope for the Best. Expect the worst. Life is a play. We're unrehearsed."~ Mel Brooks

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by cc_chiller View Post
                            There is a whole big thread about "quotas" in the ask-a-cop section (I think in the traffic enforcement sub-section). Check that out if you want.

                            In many states "quotas" are illegal. In Colorado, there are several agencies I know of where officers are required to average a certain number of tickets or traffic stops each month. They are never officially called quotas though... usually called a "goal" or “performance measure” or something like that.

                            I don't know for sure, but I would guess that CCPD motor cops do have some kind of ticket goal or quota. Keep in mind that a traffic cop's job is just that, traffic enforcement. Having a "quota" is just one way of ensuring he is actually doing his job and not just goofing off all day. If you are planning on trying to use the “quota defense” in court, I would advise against it… it will probably just make the judge mad.

                            No I wouldn't use that in court, I was just wondering whether it had any truth to it.

                            I just remembered something that happened like 2 days after I got my ticket, when I was being very cautious on the road. I'm always cautious, but currently I've really been following the speed limits and whatnot. It was past my curfew and I was going home from hanging out with my friends on a Friday night and as I was going up the street that leads to my house, which is one of those suburban communities with nature names, the car that was behind me turned out to be a cop, turned on all his lights, which scared the **** out of me, and then he went on to pass me on a double-yellow, single-lane road, and when he was past me he turned them off...hmmm I just thought I'd share that

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by xstreamblu View Post
                              the car that was behind me turned out to be a cop, turned on all his lights, which scared the **** out of me, and then he went on to pass me on a double-yellow, single-lane road, and when he was past me he turned them off...
                              Oftentimes officers are responding to calls that aren't quite "emergency" in nature (so they don't get to run code, or lights and sirens activated), but where the officer needs to arrive somewhat quickly. You said you were going about the exact speed limit (usually 25 through residential areas, or 35 out on the main road), so you were probably causing the officer to take even longer to arrive--hence the reason he passed you.
                              "Screw that. We can make bullets faster than they can make terrorists. Kill them all. Every last one." -Interceptor

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