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More Than One To Blame

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  • More Than One To Blame

    https://people.com/crime/family-neig...not-negligent/

    I looked it up on Monday the 5th, it was 97 in Las Vegas. I wasn't there, but feel there is more blame to go around.i know the officers were following the father, but what about the mother of the child was she on scene? I feel the officers waited,really 60mins. I'd wait more like 30. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to hear if the AC is on in a car or not. Thoughts?
    I'd rather be judged by 12 rather carried by 6.

    It should be noted that any and all post that are made are based on my own thought and opinions. And are not related or implied to represent the department I work for.

  • #2
    I'd ask for the offender's consent to take out the window, immediately upon my arrival. Upon anything other than immediate consent, I'd ask my supervisor to sign off on me taking out the window anyway.

    That never should have happened.

    Comment


    • #3
      ...and read the article carefully- it does not say that police waited an hour to break the window. They may have only been on scene for a few minutes before taking out the window...

      Comment


      • #4
        I stand corrected, sped reading. I question then why did he flag down officers? If he didn't want them to intervene then why? All in all the little girl should be alive. Now he knows the value of a broken window the life of his daughter.
        I'd rather be judged by 12 rather carried by 6.

        It should be noted that any and all post that are made are based on my own thought and opinions. And are not related or implied to represent the department I work for.

        Comment


        • #5
          Can already tell you thats the same kind of excuse offenders give at the jail whenever they are asked why X occurred. In order for the ac to be on the keys have to be turned half way into the ignition, and in order for the AC to be fully on the car has to be idling (after being started). The only way I could see something like this happening at all is maybe with cars that are keyless (push button starts).
          -Completely ridiculous excuse- check
          -Parent come out and say a positive statement about their son, despite the severity of his actions-check

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Levithane View Post
            In order for the ac to be on the keys have to be turned half way into the ignition, and in order for the AC to be fully on the car has to be idling (after being started).
            That is incorrect, and I would hate for someone to make a life-or-death decision based on incorrect information.

            Within the context of vehicles powered by internal combustion engines (gas, diesel, propane), the engine MUST be running, in order for the A/C system to operate. If the engine is not running, the A/C system is absolutely NOT operating, regardless of what the dash controls appear to be set to, regardless of whether the blower fan is running or not, and regardless of the position of the ignition key.

            When the engine is running, most automotive A/C systems are CAPABLE of lowering the internal temperature up to about 25 degrees or so. But a car's internal temperature could be up to 160 degrees or so on a hot sunny day, so A/C might initially only be capable of lowering a 160-degree car interior to about 135 degrees.

            If you use the recirculate function, you can then re-cool the interior air (135 degrees to 110 degrees, 110 degrees to 85 degrees, 85 degrees to 60 degrees, etc.). There are limitations, but in most cases, you can eventually get the interior temperature down to a comfortable level.

            That said, there is absolutely zero reason to believe that just because someone utters "A/C", that the interior temperature is survivable- it might not be set to recirculate, the temperature might not be set to the coldest setting, or the system may not even be working properly (if at all).

            Remember, the A/C system is operating even when you select full hot in the dead of winter when using the defrost (windshield) setting, so it's not a magic word that means "comfortable".
            Last edited by Aidokea; 10-10-2020, 10:07 PM.

            Comment


            • Levithane
              Levithane commented
              Editing a comment
              Full disclosure I would have broken the glass, my only point is this dudes excuse is horrendous. Leaving a kid in a car in a place especially like vegas where the temperature exceeds 100 degrees at certain parts of the year is inexcusable. "Man don't break the glass to get my daughter out of the car, I can't afford the repair. Well take me to court over your broken window, and you can explain to the judge why the cost of a window is more important than your kids life.
              Last edited by Levithane; 10-10-2020, 10:13 PM. Reason: grammar.

            • Aidokea
              Aidokea commented
              Editing a comment
              Offender: "Don't break my window-I can't aff..."

              SMASH!

              Me: "Here's your kid."
              Last edited by Aidokea; 10-10-2020, 10:19 PM.

          • #7
            Depending on how long (and WHY) the officers waited to break the window, I foresee the city of Las Vegas paying a large settlement to the mother of the deceased child.

            As for the POS father, I hope he rots in hell. I hear temps there are a comfortable 140 degrees. No air conditioning.

            Comment


            • #8
              The child could have been locked in the car for hours before he finally decided to call police...

              Comment


              • #9
                I have another very important question-

                WHY did he leave his infant unattended in the car AT ALL...

                ...ESPECIALLY with the keys in the car?

                This never could have happened, if he hadn't made a chain of bad decisions to set up this tragedy. He's probably been doing this ever since his child was born, and it finally went badly.

                This is why there are so many laws on the books prohibiting leaving your keys in your car, leaving children unattended in the car, leaving a car running unattended, and so on...

                Comment


                • Aidokea
                  Aidokea commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I found my answer in another article- he's claiming that he left his girlfriend's apartment due to an argument he had with her, and after putting the infant inside his car, he realized that he had forgotten his cell phone, so he went back inside to get it, and accidentally locked the door.

                  So it wasn't just his car window that was more important than his child, his phone was more important too.

                  I guess he had intended to leave the car running unattended with the keys and his child in it, UNLOCKED...
                  Last edited by Aidokea; 10-11-2020, 04:33 PM.

              • #10
                The offender is covered in tats, no mention of any employment, no mention of ever having been married to the mother(s) of his children, and the location of the scene looks like a welfare housing project. I think I can do the math on this one...

                Comment


                • Aidokea
                  Aidokea commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Bonus points for his designer clothing, gold chain, and the giant chromed aftermarket wheels on his car...

              • #11
                Bingo-

                Child Protective Services was called to investigate abuse at the infant victim's residence FIVE TIMES during her tragically short life.

                https://www.reviewjournal.com/crime/...aints-2143196/

                Comment


                • #12
                  ...and the tatted-up gold chain wearing maternal DNA donor has started a Go Fund Me page...

                  Comment


                  • Aidokea
                    Aidokea commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Her unnatural hairstyling looks expensive...

                  • not.in.MY.town
                    not.in.MY.town commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Who cares about her tatts or hairstyle? This woman lost her daughter due to someone else's poor choices. The loss of a child is devastating no matter your socio-economic background or marital status.

                    Also note that the child's mother is NOT the same person as the "girlfriend" that the father was having an argument with that day. The mother is just as innocent here as the little girl.

                  • Aidokea
                    Aidokea commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I don't care about tats or hairstyles- I care about s#itty life decisions when a child is involved.

                    Yes, the loss of the innocent child's life was an absolute tragedy.

                    And anyone with eyes, could have seen the evidence of the risk that she was in, starting with FIVE Child Protective Service investigations in less than two years.
                    Last edited by Aidokea; 10-11-2020, 04:23 PM.

                • #13
                  I haven't been able to find the arrest affidavit online, but there are a lot of additional details being reported (don't know how accurate they are) and/or can be gathered from this guy's social media accounts -- none of which make this child's death any less tragic or infuriating.

                  Vehicle was a Nissan Altima (don't know year) which he recently purchased and bragged about on Facebook. In the same post he announced that he just got a better job and was now making $18/hour. He and mother of the child are separated and share custody.

                  On the day of the incident, he got into a verbal argument with his girlfriend and left her place with his daughter. As he was putting the child into his vehicle he realized he had left his cellphone at his girlfriend's house. He left the kid (not yet strapped into the car seat) and went back to his girlfriend's apartment to retrieve his cellphone. It appears she refused to give the phone back, and after another 15 minutes of arguing he left. When he returned to the vehicle he realized he had locked the keys inside, so he again returned to his girlfriend's house. He asked her to call his car insurance company. She spent more than 20 minutes on the phone with an insurance agent who informed her that the policy didn't include road side assistance. They gave him a quote for a locksmith, but the father decided it was too expensive.

                  That's when he returned to the vehicle and flagged down police and told them about the situation. According to officers, they could see the child breathing. They offered to call a locksmith or tow truck for him, both of which he refused because it would be too expensive. He then asked to borrow a cellphone to call his brother in order to obtain his mother's insurance information (presumably to get free lock-out services). He told the brother that the A/C was on (unlikely or impossible) and that his daughter was fine. The brother rushed to the scene and immediately got ready to break the car window, but he stopped him because he "couldn't afford a new window" and he would rather wait for a tow truck (which he also previously refused). He also argued with officers not to break his window.

                  As of now, it's not clear how much time passed, but the officers eventually went ahead and broke the window and removed the child. They allegedly stated in their report that rigor mortis had already started to set in. Granted, in high temps RM can set in more quickly...but I cannot imagine that the child went from visibly breathing to becoming stiff within a matter of minutes. I don't want to rush to judgment, but it does appear that officers waited a lot longer than was reasonable.

                  Comment


                  • Aidokea
                    Aidokea commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Thank you for consolidating all of that information.

                    The only part that I take issue with, is your last sentence, regarding the officers waiting too long, which is a significant leap.
                    Last edited by Aidokea; 10-11-2020, 02:33 PM.

                  • Aidokea
                    Aidokea commented
                    Editing a comment
                    It is yet another clue about how he cared for his child, that he put the infant into the car without properly fastening her into a child safety seat.

                  • not.in.MY.town
                    not.in.MY.town commented
                    Editing a comment
                    [As with everything, I can only base my assessment on the information that's publicly available...which may or may not be accurate].

                    As I said above, according to a department spokesperson, the officers reported that the child was visibly breathing when they arrived...and that she was in the early stages of rigor mortis by the time they broke the window. You don't need to be a death investigator to know that something doesn't add up.

                    We do know that, at a minimum, the officers stood by from the time they were flagged down until the brother arrived on scene. What we don't know is how much time passed between the officers' arrival and when the phone call was placed (remember the father had to borrow a phone), how long the call lasted, and how long it took the brother to get there. We also don't know how long the officers waited to break the window after the brother arrived. Did they have to obtain a supervisor's approval first? Those are all crucial pieces of information that are missing at this point.

                  • Aidokea
                    Aidokea commented
                    Editing a comment
                    All good points.

                    Nobody HAS to wait for a supervisor's permission to save a life, but in a situation like this, taking a few seconds to obtain a supervisor's permission takes the monkey off of the officer's back for the broken window...

                • #14
                  Stories like this make me miss the good old days when we could just use a slim jim to unlock a motorist's vehicle - quick, no or minimal damage, and free of charge.

                  Comment


                  • #15
                    Originally posted by not.in.MY.town View Post
                    Stories like this make me miss the good old days when we could just use a slim jim to unlock a motorist's vehicle - quick, no or minimal damage, and free of charge.
                    We have and use lockout kits all the time.
                    Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

                    My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

                    Comment

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