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VA State Trooper writes MEDAL OF HONOR Recipient a speeding summons

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  • Woofdog
    replied
    If I were a Chief or a Sheriff, and one of my sworn officers summarily decided to exempt an individual from the law solely because of his status, that officer would be looking for other employment.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gene L
    replied
    You're right, Mr. Booth. It says more about the cop than it does the MOH winner.

    Leave a comment:


  • SWATCybercop
    replied
    Let's give war heroes RESPECT and ADMIRATION. Let's NOT give them a free pass to break the law.
    Wiser words were never spoken.

    Leave a comment:


  • scratched13
    replied
    Originally posted by djack16 View Post
    Please show me where the MOH winners are exempt from traffic laws and I will shut my yapper right up.

    Then does putting Paris Hilton in jail improve public safety as a whole? Does giving a ticket to the speeding, Ferrari-driving CEO improve it? The soccer mom late for dinner?
    It's a battle that is fought one person at a time. Tickets and points on one's record have been known to affect driving behavior.
    Gene you like to assume and, of course, it makes an *** of u and me. Maybe you should drop your jingoist rantings of "you haven't served this country" crap and address the issue at hand. All the red herrings are starting to make the place smell like fish.

    I would never disrespect the service of our vets but if they disrespect the law they will have earned their punishment. To suggest that writing an MOH recipient is disrespectful of their service puts the accountability on the cop, not the violator. Traffic infractions count absolutely. If you don't think traffic infractions matter that much then I question your intelligence. It's the same people that think like that who end up not signaling lane changes that cause wrecks. My first car crash was because some idiot didn't think signaling one's car movements was very important. In that situation, I was lucky to come out of it unscathed.

    And Gene when I mentioned color of law I was referring to an act that resembles legal authority but actually isn't. Letting go all people who are friends, family, co-workers, or respected for nothing more than the fact they are those things is NOT what discretion is intended for.
    Regardless of all that, Woof sounds more like he knows what he's talking about than you. Someone who plays down the importance of driving your car safely is someone who does not respect the danger it can pose to the public in the wrong hands. These are multi-ton vehicles out on the road and misusing them even slightly can wind up killing someone. A friend of mine was almost caught under the wheels of a moron who did a California right turn without paying attention to his right. He ended up hitting my friend who had stopped at the stop sign on his bike and was crossing the street. I ALWAYS come to a complete stop at stop signs and use that moment to check my environment (cars coming, bicycles, children, etc.) Shoot...I stop at the limit line even when building block my view THEN move up and check to see if it's clear. Not that hard to do.
    I hate saying this, but there is very little here that can be argued against.

    Leave a comment:


  • VSPClem
    replied
    Originally posted by Deputy08
    Listen if the guy got a ticket so what. I wouldnt have given him a ticket, but that is just me. The thing that ****es me off is the trooper and what he said. "It means nothing", wtf, what an ***. He deserves to be slapped and then fired
    Catch up to the facts my man. A few pages ago it was found the guy who wrote it wasn't a Trooper.

    Leave a comment:


  • Woofdog
    replied
    Originally posted by SWATCybercop View Post
    Woof,

    How dare you argue law enforcement procedures with someone who has soooo much life experience and law enforcement training?



    SWAT,

    Yep. One A.F.G.E. after another.

    Obviously, none of these guys have ever looked into the tear-filled eyes of a mother or father after they have been informed their kid was seriously hurt or killed by a speeding driver. And you know what? None of them EVER asked me whether the driver at fault was a war hero!

    Let's give war heroes RESPECT and ADMIRATION. Let's NOT give them a free pass to break the law.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    For what it's worth, I've seen more fatal crashes caused by cops chasing other cars for traffic than I have caused by 80 year-old men, let alone 80 year-old MOH recipients. And I'm speaking literally, not figuratively. Same goes for cops driving too fast for conditions to get to the 10th false burglar alarm of the day, blowing red lights to get to that family trouble run 3 or 4 seconds quicker......If you're going to write the guy because you think you're going to save someone's life, you should probably write cops under the circumstances I mentioned too.

    I don't think a Medal of Honor is a get out of jail free card whether we're talking about traffic or armed robbery (We had a MOH recipient in Detroit shot to death while robbing a liquor store). But I sure as hell wouldn't write one whether the guy was a jerk or not. That would say more about me than it would about the violator.
    Last edited by Frank Booth; 06-07-2007, 06:28 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • djack16
    replied
    Medal of Honor winners are given certain preferential treatment: free license plates, in my state. And free drivers' license; all vets are.
    Please show me where the MOH winners are exempt from traffic laws and I will shut my yapper right up.
    Writing the man a ticket in no way that I can see improves public safety as a whole.
    Then does putting Paris Hilton in jail improve public safety as a whole? Does giving a ticket to the speeding, Ferrari-driving CEO improve it? The soccer mom late for dinner?
    It's a battle that is fought one person at a time. Tickets and points on one's record have been known to affect driving behavior.

    Gene you like to assume and, of course, it makes an *** of u and me. Maybe you should drop your jingoist rantings of "you haven't served this country" crap and address the issue at hand. All the red herrings are starting to make the place smell like fish.

    I would never disrespect the service of our vets but if they disrespect the law they will have earned their punishment. To suggest that writing an MOH recipient is disrespectful of their service puts the accountability on the cop, not the violator. Traffic infractions count absolutely. If you don't think traffic infractions matter that much then I question your intelligence. It's the same people that think like that who end up not signaling lane changes that cause wrecks. My first car crash was because some idiot didn't think signaling one's car movements was very important. In that situation, I was lucky to come out of it unscathed.

    And Gene when I mentioned color of law I was referring to an act that resembles legal authority but actually isn't. Letting go all people who are friends, family, co-workers, or respected for nothing more than the fact they are those things is NOT what discretion is intended for.

    Regardless of all that, Woof sounds more like he knows what he's talking about than you. Someone who plays down the importance of driving your car safely is someone who does not respect the danger it can pose to the public in the wrong hands. These are multi-ton vehicles out on the road and misusing them even slightly can wind up killing someone. A friend of mine was almost caught under the wheels of a moron who did a California right turn without paying attention to his right. He ended up hitting my friend who had stopped at the stop sign on his bike and was crossing the street. I ALWAYS come to a complete stop at stop signs and use that moment to check my environment (cars coming, bicycles, children, etc.) Shoot...I stop at the limit line even when building block my view THEN move up and check to see if it's clear. Not that hard to do.

    Leave a comment:


  • scratched13
    replied
    Originally posted by Gene L View Post
    Who said he was a "hazard"? Does writing an attitude ticket make him less a hazard?

    You're on the wrong side here. I'll bet you never served your country. Also, is a speeding cop any less of a hazard than a speeding citizen?
    I don't like seeing cops speed as well. Yes, writing him may make him think twice about speeding or make him more self conscious.

    Leave a comment:


  • scratched13
    replied
    Originally posted by Gene L View Post
    Sure, but I can't see an 82 year old MOH winner going 13 over (I think that's the speed) being enough of a ***** to get a ticket.

    I've seen plenty of cops who were, and are ******. A citizen can't write him a ticket for a ****poor attitude, and his prickiness is reinforced.

    I'm sure you've seen plenty of cops who are ******. If you haven't you haven't been in law enforcement long enough.
    Benefits of the job I guess. I don't tend to like or hang out with these types though.

    Leave a comment:


  • scratched13
    replied
    Originally posted by Gene L View Post
    You are assuming that your attitude has nothing to do with his attitude.

    That is presumptive. I've seen some pretty arrogant traffic cops in my time, and other cops as well. This seems true especially in traffic cops, as they have all the evidence, they are dealing with minor infractions (usually) and they won't be argued with. I've found the more minute the law enforcement task, the more strictly it's enforced.

    Try doing anything fun at a US Park, for example. Pick a flower, even carry home a feather...you get caught, you're busted.

    And please don't tell me you never speed, or roll through a stop sign, or whatever.

    Writing a ticket for attitude may be your policy, and I can't say I've never done it, but it is more of an indicator of you and me than it is the offender. And it's possible that I have encouraged that attitude, to tell the truth.
    Nope, sorry. You get no cigar. If you were to ask ANYONE that has ridden with me, you would not get any indication of "attitude" on my part. Heck, most would consider me folkesy. I try to always put people at ease. That is why it always amazes me when people tun on the juice.

    Leave a comment:


  • SWATCybercop
    replied
    Originally posted by Deputy08
    As someone who is about to join the military and a future LEO hopeful, ...





    Woof,

    How dare you argue law enforcement procedures with someone who has soooo much life experience and law enforcement training?

    Leave a comment:


  • Woofdog
    replied
    Originally posted by Gene L View Post
    Who said he was a "hazard"? Does writing an attitude ticket make him less a hazard?

    You're on the wrong side here. I'll bet you never served your country. Also, is a speeding cop any less of a hazard than a speeding citizen?

    You lose. You're wrong on your statement above, and you're wrong on the issue. Served an entire career during peace and war, overseas and in CONUS. Enlisted and commissioned. Retired honorably before becoming a civilian LEO, and have served my country and community as an LEO many years after military retirement. Still serving. Still protecting. Still working hard for innocent victims.

    No, I'm definitely not on the wrong side of this one. But I won't convince you and some others. Maybe once you become a LEO and gain some experience on the street, especially dealing with aftermaths of stupid behavior, your opinion will change. Maybe not.

    No skin off my back.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gene L
    replied
    Who said he was a "hazard"? Does writing an attitude ticket make him less a hazard?

    You're on the wrong side here. I'll bet you never served your country. Also, is a speeding cop any less of a hazard than a speeding citizen?
    Last edited by Gene L; 06-06-2007, 09:43 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Woofdog
    replied
    True, but that doesn't give him or anyone else the unchallenged right to be a hazard to the motoring public.

    When you've made a few casualty calls for traffic deaths, you may change your mind.

    Leave a comment:

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