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  • Driver BAC

    I was curious what people thought about the .08 limit. Reading this list of other nations, it seems ours is basically one of the highest tolerated limits in the world. What do you all think about it?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Driving..._the_influence

    Europe

    * Albania: 0.1 mg/ml[2]
    * Austria: 0.05% and 0.01% for drivers who have held a licence for less than 2 years and drivers of vehicles over 7.5 tonnes
    * Belarus: 0.5 mg/ml[2]
    * Belgium: 0.5 mg/ml[2]
    * Bosnia-Herzegovina: 0.05%
    * Bulgaria: 0.05%
    * Croatia: Zero
    * Czech Republic: Zero[2]
    * Denmark: 0.5 mg/l, imprisonment if over 0.8
    * Estonia: 0.2 mg/ml[2]
    * France: 0.5 mg/ml[2]
    * Finland: 0.5 mg/ml[2], 0.12% (aggravated)
    * Germany: 0.5 mg/ml[2] and zero for drivers conducting commercial transportation of passengers; 0.11% (aggravated)
    * Gibraltar: 0.05 ml [3]
    * Greece: 0.5 mg/ml[2] and 0.02% for drivers who have held a license for less than 2 years and bus drivers
    * Hungary: Zero[2]
    * Iceland: 0.5 mg/ml[2]
    * Ireland: 0.8 mg/ml[2]
    * Italy: 0.5 mg/ml[2]
    * Latvia: 0.02% for drivers with less than 2 years' experience and 0.05% for those with more than 2 years' experience
    * Liechtenstein: 0.08%
    * Lithuania: 0.4 mg/ml[2]
    * Luxembourg: 0.8 mg/ml[2]
    * Malta: 0.8 mg/ml[2]
    * Netherlands: 0.5 mg/ml[2], 0.02% for drivers with less than 5 years' experience
    * Norway: 0.2 mg/ml[2]
    * Poland: 0.2 mg/ml[2]
    * Portugal: 0.5 mg/ml[2]
    * Republic of Moldova: 0.3 mg/ml[2]
    * Romania: Zero
    * Russia: 0.2-0.5 mg/ml[2]
    * Slovakia: Zero[2]
    * Slovenia: 0.00% for drivers with 2 years or less experience and professional drivers, 0.05% for all others.
    * Spain: 0.05% [4] and 0.03% for drivers with less than 2 years experience and drivers of freight vehicles over 3.5 tonnes, and of passenger vehicles with more than 9 seats.
    * Sweden: 0.02% (up to 6 months imprisonment), 0.10% (up to 2 years imprisonment)
    * Switzerland: 0.5 mg/ml[2]
    * Turkey: 0.5 mg/ml[2]
    * Ukraine: Zero
    * United Kingdom: 0.8 mg/ml[2]

    Note: "Zero" usually means "below detection limit".

    Turkey’s 0.05% limit only applies to passenger-less compact vehicles; for all others it’s 0.00%. In Germany the 0.05% limit is effective unless you’re arrested for another traffic offence, in which case it drops to 0.03%

    [edit] Americas

    * Argentina: 0.05%
    * Belize: 0.08%
    * Bolivia: 0.07%
    * Brazil: 0.06%
    * Canada: 0.08%
    * Chile: 0.049%
    * Colombia: 0.04%
    * Costa Rica: 0.049% License plates are immediately removed from the drunk driver's vehicle.
    * Cuba: Zero
    * Dominican Republic: No Limit (0.05% for professional drivers)
    * Ecuador: 0.07%
    * El Salvador: 0.05%
    * Guatemala: 0.08%
    * Guyana: 0.01%
    * Honduras: 0.07%
    * Jamaica: 0.035%
    * Mexico: 0.08%
    * Nicaragua: 0.08%
    * Panama: Zero
    * Paraguay: 0.08%
    * Peru: 0.045%
    * Suriname: 0.08%
    * United States: 0.08% (see above)
    * Uruguay: 0.08%
    * Venezuela: 0.05%

    [edit] Africa

    * Algeria: 0.01%
    * Benin: 0.05%
    * Cape Verde: 0.08%
    * Central African Republic: 0.08%
    * Comoros: No Limit
    * Congo: No Limit
    * Equatorial Guinea: Zero
    * Eritrea: Zero
    * Ethiopia: No Limit
    * The Gambia: Zero
    * Ghana: 0.08%
    * Guinea: Zero
    * Guinea-Bissau: 0.05%
    * Kenya: 0.08%
    * Malawi: Zero
    * Mauritius: 0.05%
    * Namibia: 0.05%
    * Niger: 0.08%
    * Nigeria: Zero
    * Seychelles: 0.08%
    * South Africa: 0.05% and 0.02% for professional drivers (trucks over 3.5 tonnes, and vehicles carrying passengers for reward) National Road Traffic Act, 1996
    * Togo: No Limit
    * Uganda: 0.08%
    * Tanzania: 0.05%
    * Zambia: 0.08%

    [edit] Caucasus

    * Armenia: Zero
    * Azerbaijan: Zero
    * Georgia: 0.03%

    [edit] Middle East

    * Egypt : 0.05%
    * Iran: Zero, as drinking alcohol is illegal in Iran.
    * Israel: 0.05%
    * Jordan: Zero
    * Kuwait: Zero, as drinking alcohol is illegal in Kuwait.
    * Saudi Arabia: Zero, as drinking alcohol is illegal in Saudi Arabia.

    [edit] East Asia

    * China: >20mg/100ml (RMB 200-500 fine, 1-3 months license suspension); >80mg/100ml (up to 15 days prison, 3-6 months license suspension, RMB 500-2000 fine) Ministry of Public Safety
    * Hong Kong: 0.05% If driving under alcohol influence beyond legal limit, one can be fined and jailed up to 3 years.
    * Japan: 0.03%
    * Republic of Korea: 0.05%

    [edit] Western Pacific

    * French Polynesia: 0.05%
    * Micronesia: 0.05%
    * New Zealand has a limit of 0.08% for drivers over 20 years, 0.03% for those under. LTSA website
    * Palau: 0.01%

    [edit] Central Asia

    * Kyrgyzstan: 0.05%
    * Mongolia: 0.02%
    * Turkmenistan: 0.033%

    [edit] South Asia

    * Pakistan: Zero, as drinking alcohol is illegal.
    * India: 0.03%. [5]
    * Nepal: Zero, no such law.
    * Sri Lanka: 0.06%

    [edit] South-East Asia

    * Cambodia: 0.05%
    * Laos: No Limit
    * Malaysia: 0.08%
    * Philippines: 0.05%
    * Singapore: 0.08%
    * Thailand: 0.05%
    * Indonesia: No Limit

  • #2
    I'd never be able to get to work in Euorpe.

    "Why is common sense so rare?" - Me

    By the way.. They aren't "Clients" or "Customers" they're CRIMINALS... sheesh

    Comment


    • #3

      While most states in the USA are at .08% BAC level for DUI, aren't there still some that have .10% BAC as their standard? Whatever your opinion on this issue, each state should have the right to set its own DUI standard (at least if the US Constitution's Tenth Amendment is given any say so).

      Yeah, I know....the US Constitution don't mean diddly-squat to most politicians these days.


      I shall refrain from further comments.....at least for now. Thanks for the information about what other nations do, though. Very interesting data!



      P.S. I once arrested a guy at .19% and he could still walk and talk. I would have passed out long before reaching that level.

      The comments above reflect my personal opinion as a private citizen, ordinary motorist and all-around good guy.

      The aforementioned advice should not be construed to represent any type of professional opinion, legal counsel or other type of instruction with regard to traffic laws, judicial proceedings or official agency policy.

      ------------------------------------------------

      "Ignorance on fire is hotter than knowledge on ice."

      Comment


      • #4
        Driver B.A.C.

        You did some great research. The .08 BAC adopted by many states, was largely due to great pressure from organizations like MADD. (Mothers Against Drunk Driving). Perhaps the biggest problem we face in this nation, is the actual post arrest sentencing for DUI. Courts seldom enforce the maximum penalties available to them. Often times, the Judge's motivation is compassionate in nature. Sometimes that works, more often than not it doesn't. The debate could go on all day, but all too often, the drunk driver is back out on the road all too soon.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by VA Dutch
          Whatever your opinion on this issue, each state should have the right to set its own DUI standard
          Technically they do. No state has to have DUI laws or speed limits or School Zones.

          But, if they got rid of those things, they would lose millions of dollars in federal grants, etc.

          So, technically each state has total control. Politically, it is still Washington deciding what happens.

          * Dominican Republic: No Limit (0.05% for professional drivers)
          * Comoros: No Limit
          * Congo: No Limit
          * Ethiopia: No Limit
          * Togo: No Limit
          * Nepal: Zero, no such law
          * Laos: No Limit
          * Indonesia: No Limit
          I wonder what their DUI statistics look like?

          Personally, I know damn well that I could drive at .1% BAC. I could also articulate a speech in front of a crowd.

          Unfortunately people are far too different for the BAC standard to accurately measure impairment.

          The best suggestion I have to help with the problem in America is to increase the penalties, not make stricter laws about acceptable BAC's that arrest more people.

          I think a combination of Hong Kong and Costa Rica's policies seems nice:
          • License plates are immediately removed from the drunk driver's vehicle.
          • Fined and jailed up to 3 years


          3 years might be a long time, I say around 1 year is a better idea.

          Comment


          • #6
            well, most of those countries listed above are pretty underdeveloped and there are a lot more pedestrians, non-motorized vehicles and such compared to cars. I imagine in such countries, they would look at drunken driving as a pretty minor problem compared to the other problems they have.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by tehJet View Post
              well, most of those countries listed above are pretty underdeveloped and there are a lot more pedestrians, non-motorized vehicles and such compared to cars. I imagine in such countries, they would look at drunken driving as a pretty minor problem compared to the other problems they have.
              That's what I figured but still, I wonder what the relationship is between DUI crashes and the total number of drivers on the roads.

              Comment


              • #8
                Personally, I know damn well that I could drive at .1% BAC.
                Let's not get the decimal's mixed up....I assume you mean .01% BAC. I have seen people throwing up with a BAC just over .10%. There are many other factors when it comes to BAC levels (i.e. age, weight, how much they drink, food).

                That's what I figured but still, I wonder what the relationship is between DUI crashes and the total number of drivers on the roads.
                It's probably pretty low, but that figure doesn't concern me as much as the figures from FARS that show how many fatal crashes involve alcohol.

                We DO know that in the US alone, a person died every 31 minutes in 2004 from alcohol-related crashes.

                I think someone can definitely be impaired at .08% and lower. Case in point, a high school aged girl weighing 90lbs who has never drank before on an empty stomach. She would probably start showing good clues of impairment and the .04/.05% levels.
                I'm 10-8 like a shark in a sea of crime..

                Comment

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