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  • Armed Security on its way to become Police Officers

    Saw and read this article on armed security officer working in schools will soon become Police Officers once completing training. Not being from Pennsylvania how does that work? Were these armed guys working for the school already or a private company? I've seen jobs of private security having the title of police officer. Just curious. In California all school police departments send folks through a regular academy or folks transfered from a police or sheriff department with experience.

    https://www.wtae.com/article/armed-s...trict/29372489
    I'd rather be judged by 12 rather carried by 6.

    It should be noted that any and all post that are made are based on my own thought and opinions. And are not related or implied to represent the department I work for.

  • #2
    Basically if the school district or company which hired them has them sworn in as school police, they have to meet a minimum standard set forth by the MPOETC (PA POST) and the state department of education.

    Requirements include:

    ​​​​​​Graduation from a law enforcement training academy meeting 500 hrs
    Certification under Act 235, Lethal Weapons Training Act with firearms
    Minimum of 2 years as a law enforcement officer at the local, state or federal/military level
    CPR/First Aid/AED certified
    Background investigation to include records check via fingerprints through the FBI

    Sheriff's deputies in PA are not law enforcement officers but can be used as SRO's under this state law.
    I don't answer recruitment messages....

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    • #3
      And PA is weird as they have folks titled as school police officers yet are unsworn. Philadelphia school police does this.
      I don't answer recruitment messages....

      Comment


      • #4
        Sheriff deputies are not sworn???? That whole law just seems odd
        I'd rather be judged by 12 rather carried by 6.

        It should be noted that any and all post that are made are based on my own thought and opinions. And are not related or implied to represent the department I work for.

        Comment


        • orlandofed5-0
          orlandofed5-0 commented
          Editing a comment
          They're sworn but PA law doesn't consider them to be law enforcement officers in the way municipal police, public university police and state police are. They have very limited authority mainly for breach of peace offenses and court enforce orders.

        • GangGreen712
          GangGreen712 commented
          Editing a comment
          They can't arrest for anything, including felonies, not committed in their presence, even on county property. If, while serving a warrant, they find the person committed an additional crime (ex. they have drugs on them), they have to call the local or state police to file the charge.

      • #5
        Originally posted by moparfan View Post
        Sheriff deputies are not sworn???? That whole law just seems odd
        PA's law enforcement system is screwed up six ways to Sunday, and probably the most inefficient setup of any state in the country. Sheriffs deputies are not considered police officers, and their powers are closer to that of armed security or bail enforcement agents than actual cops. PA is made up of over 2,500 municipalities, mostly small boroughs and townships. About half of the municipalities have either their own PD or have combined with neighboring municipalities to form a regional PD, and those without local police coverage rely on PSP. None of the chiefs want to give up their little kingdoms. So they also make sure that neither sheriffs nor their deputies ever become full police officers, lest the municipalities be tempted to save money by contracting with the sheriff's office for police services.
        "If the police have to come get you, they're bringing an @$$ kicking with them!"
        -Chris Rock

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        • #6
          Originally posted by GangGreen712 View Post

          PA's law enforcement system is screwed up six ways to Sunday, and probably the most inefficient setup of any state in the country. Sheriffs deputies are not considered police officers, and their powers are closer to that of armed security or bail enforcement agents than actual cops. PA is made up of over 2,500 municipalities, mostly small boroughs and townships. About half of the municipalities have either their own PD or have combined with neighboring municipalities to form a regional PD, and those without local police coverage rely on PSP. None of the chiefs want to give up their little kingdoms. So they also make sure that neither sheriffs nor their deputies ever become full police officers, lest the municipalities be tempted to save money by contracting with the sheriff's office for police services.
          AGreed absurd!

          isnt the sheriff the only law enforcement entity in the constitution.

          PA is a 180 from FL. Even CA has huge sheriffs offices with thousands of deputies patrolling unincorporated and incorporated contract towns

          Comment


          • #7
            A big portion of the Northeast is weird about sheriff's offices

            PA is as discussed
            MD has some counties where the sheriff's are full service and others where they are transport, civil and court security
            DE Sheriff's I believe are only civil
            NJ Sheriff's have criminal divisions but have limited patrol/general call takin duties
            NY Sheriff's are a mix from civil/jail only to full service
            CT doesn't have sheriff's (or counties)
            RI has state sheriff's (court security and a search and rescue unit for some reason)
            MA sheriff's are primarily civil/jails with some having criminal responsibility (with varying degrees of respect)

            Comment


            • HighwayBob
              HighwayBob commented
              Editing a comment
              CT DOES have counties. They just don't really mean anything. There are no county governments or agencies.

            • HighwayBob
              HighwayBob commented
              Editing a comment
              As far as I know, all NY sheriff's departments are full-service and are police officers except for one - the New York City Sheriffs Office.

            • vc859
              vc859 commented
              Editing a comment
              I never realized CT kept their counties

              Also Westchester County Sheriff's are a volunteer peace officer force that primarily does traffic control at parades

              Nassau County Sheriff's and Suffolk County Sheriff's are police officers although I don't believe they are primary call taking agencies

              I believe Rockland County Sheriff's have a road patrol but it is primarily for county properties and special units. I don't think they are the primary agency for any area

              Orange County Sheriff's have a road patrol and answer 911 polls but again I don't believe they are considered the primary agency for anything other than county property

              I think there is also a Sheriff's agency upstate NY that also doesn't have a road patrol.
              Last edited by vc859; 10-09-2019, 10:13 PM.

            • GangGreen712
              GangGreen712 commented
              Editing a comment
              The counties in CT are used as judicial jurisdictions, geographical boundaries, and census and statistical purposes only. Despite having no county government since the 1960s, CT DID have sheriffs until 2000, though they only provided court security, prisoner transport, served civil papers, and had no police powers whatsoever (I don't think they were even armed). The sheriff's offices were dissolved and absorbed into the CT State Marshal agency, which now provides all the court services.

          • #8
            Originally posted by vc859 View Post
            A big portion of the Northeast is weird about sheriff's offices

            The northeast states place a lot more emphasis on local government than the rest of the country. In all the states you mentioned except MD and DE, there are no unincorporated areas; all the land is under some level of municipal government. Even in northeast states that do have county governments, the town governments are strong enough to weaken the influence of the county and reduce municipalities' reliance on it. In New England, the state government handles all the stuff the local governments can't or won't, and that includes law enforcement. As a result, the office of the sheriff has never carried as much influence in the northeast as it does it other parts of the country.

            MD has some counties where the sheriff's are full service and others where they are transport, civil and court security
            MD is much more like the southern states in how it's local government runs. The majority of land is unincorporated, incorporated municipalities are typically weaker and less influential, and most day to day law enforcement is carried out by either the sheriff's office or the county police. Most of the county PDs were created not because MD is weird about sheriffs, but because rapid population growth and increases in crime at the beginning of the 20th century overwhelmed the sheriff's offices', so the county PDs were formed help take the pressure off of them. The five most populous counties in MD have PDs; all the rest have sheriff's offices that do both court stuff and law enforcement. However, all sheriff's deputies in the state, regardless of their everyday duties, are full police officers, and in counties that have PDs, deputies still have the power and authority to do everything a county police officer can.

            DE Sheriff's I believe are only civil
            DE is one I don't understand why the SOs are so restricted. Most of DE's land is unincorporated and county government is strong in that state; one would think the sheriff would be an influential figure. However, New Castle County has a PD to cover the unincorporated areas, and DE State Police cover the unincorporated areas of the other two counties.

            NJ Sheriff's have criminal divisions but have limited patrol/general call takin duties
            Only a couple sheriff's offices have any patrol/general LE function at all. The majority of NJ municipalities have their own PDs, and NJSP covers most of the towns that don't. However, I believe all deputies are police officers and have full law enforcement powers, regardless of duties.

            NY Sheriff's are a mix from civil/jail only to full service
            I think that NYC, Westchester, Nassau, and Suffolk are the only counties that DON'T have full service sheriff's offices. The size and scope of sheriff's duties varies throughout the state: In some counties, most of the towns have their own PDs, so the sheriffs just do supplementary patrols or provide special services. In other counties, they are the primary LE agency throughout most of the county. And in other places, they share primary jurisdiction with NYSP.

            MA sheriff's are primarily civil/jails with some having criminal responsibility (with varying degrees of respect)
            Interesting fact: MA county sheriffs offices are actually state agencies, as most of MA's counties have dissolved their governments (I think only three counties still have any governmental functions). They are, like you said primarily correctional agencies (pre-trial and short sentences), though I don't think any of them fall under the Department of Corrections. Most of the correctional deputies are considered COs only and aren't sworn. However, deputies on the warrant units I think are considered special police officers and have some arrest power. Middlesex County has a SWAT team that, according to their description, is an actual law enforcement SWAT unit that handles barricades, hostages, high risk warrants, and all that stuff (as opposed to a CERT unit). I don't know what kind of general police powers the deputies on that team possess though, if any. The multi-agency Northeast MA Regional LE Council (NEMLEC) SWAT team handles most of the SWAT callouts in that area, so I don't know what MCSO's SWAT unit actually does.
            "If the police have to come get you, they're bringing an @$$ kicking with them!"
            -Chris Rock

            Comment


            • #9
              In Delaware, sheriff's were never granted law enforcement authority. Basically since DE is small enough, the state police handle areas without a police presence. Also New Castle county's police authority is codified in a weird way. Everything above the C and D canal (Wilmington North) belongs to the DSP and everything below (Wilmington South) falls under NCCoPD.
              I don't answer recruitment messages....

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              • #10
                https://mpoetc.psp.pa.gov/Pages/School-Police.aspx


                For those wondering what the requirements for the school police position
                I don't answer recruitment messages....

                Comment


                • #11
                  Originally posted by orlandofed5-0 View Post
                  In Delaware, sheriff's were never granted law enforcement authority. Basically since DE is small enough, the state police handle areas without a police presence. Also New Castle county's police authority is codified in a weird way. Everything above the C and D canal (Wilmington North) belongs to the DSP and everything below (Wilmington South) falls under NCCoPD.
                  Isn't there something about the road type as well? I thought I read that if the address was on a county road it was NCCoPD but if it was off of a state road it was DSP?

                  Comment


                  • orlandofed5-0
                    orlandofed5-0 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    That was the amended agreement from 1974.

                • #12
                  A lot of this has to do with the size or the territory being covered. As mentioned above there are several eastern states where there is virtually no unincorporated territory... so there is little need for a Sheriff as seen out west. It was mentioned above that a Sheriff's office had "never" had full law enforcement authority... I doubt that's true. Back when everyone was on horseback I expect there were sheriffs, marshals or similar officials who handed law enforcement outside of towns. As things progressed those offices have been eliminated or reduced in authority.

                  Something similar happened in Denver. There is now no part of Denver County than is not also part of the City of Denver, so the Denver PD handles all law enforcement duties, and the Denver SO handles custody and court security. The power of the Sheriff is vested in the Chief of the DPD and the "sheriff" is no longer even elected... he's appointed.

                  Conversely the county I used to work in Colorado, Park County, is about the same size as Delaware... 2200 square miles. The population when I left was about 17,000. There were two incorporated municipalities, both with PDs. One at full strength had 3 officers, the other had 1... and for much of the time I was there had 1 and none. We took a large number of their calls as primary, and backed them on anything halfway serious anyway... so essentially every real call they had was also our call one way or another.

                  That's very different than the actual Delaware.
                  "I am a Soldier. I fight where I'm told and I win where I fight." -- GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

                  "With a brother on my left and a sister on my right, we face…. We face what no one should face. We face, so no one else would face. We are in the face of Death." -- Holli Peet

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