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Why do Harley-Davidson police motorcycles have a top speed less than a Toyota Prius?

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  • Aidokea
    replied
    Fair enough...

    Leave a comment:


  • Aidokea
    commented on 's reply
    It's not something that I encourage lay people to take up, but if it is someone's passion, then I want to help them to stack the deck in their favor with regards to safety.

  • Saluki89
    commented on 's reply
    I just can't fathom going that fast on two wheels. Maybe I'll get the bug later in life.

  • Aidokea
    commented on 's reply
    Wow, that's pretty impressive. To be fair, the RV4 is a high-performance kit plane, and anything can be hand-built to be fast. The fastest hand-built Hayabusa that I know of, is Bill Warner's 1,000 horsepower Hayabusa. He did a traction-limited 311.945 mph in 1.5 mikes from a standing start at Loring AFB.
    Last edited by Aidokea; 01-16-2020, 02:51 PM.

  • Saluki89
    commented on 's reply
    The RV4 I flew would do over 200mph WOT on the deck.

  • 9L81
    replied
    Originally posted by Aidokea View Post

    I have no desire to turn bad drivers into good drivers- I want to turn bad drivers into pedestrians and/or inmates. If they want to take the initiative to turn themselves into good drivers before I get to them, then I wish them the best in their pursuit.
    I'm not referring to bad drivers. They are usually just too lazy to care if they get better or not and even if they knew how to drive better it likely wouldn't change their approach. But there are many drivers who do their best but could do better if they knew what to do. Riding experience gives another perspective and the what to do part becomes a lot more clear. That's what I am referring to.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aidokea
    replied
    Originally posted by 9L81 View Post

    Riding is great for clearing your head. That is what I liked about it when I first started. It forces concentration which if you lose, you can easily get hurt bad or die. Great motivation.
    Riding a motorcycle on public roads shared with cars and trucks, is extremely dangerous. For that reason, you should never get on a road-going motorcycle unless your head is already clear.

    Yeah it's not for everyone but it makes you a better driver. Because of that I wish more people would give it a try.
    I have no desire to turn bad drivers into good drivers- I want to turn bad drivers into pedestrians and/or inmates. If they want to take the initiative to turn themselves into good drivers before I get to them, then I wish them the best in their pursuit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aidokea
    replied
    Originally posted by Saluki89 View Post
    I've done some pretty fast low level flying in my aviation days but I'll never get on a bike. Props to those who do but it's not for me.
    Im assuming that your use of the word "fast" does not mean going fast around a corner or accelerating quickly from a dead stop.

    Within that context, it is important to know that simply counteracting a motorcycle's throttle return spring, is not a skill. It's not a measure of strength. It's not a measure of courage. In many cases, it's not a measure of intelligence either.

    That said, I have heard that there are some piston-powered private airplanes that are faster than my Hayabusa was- I've just never encountered one.

    Leave a comment:


  • 9L81
    replied
    Originally posted by Saluki89 View Post
    I've done some pretty fast low level flying in my aviation days but I'll never get on a bike. Props to those who do but it's not for me.
    Riding is great for clearing your head. That is what I liked about it when I first started. It forces concentration which if you lose, you can easily get hurt bad or die. Great motivation. Yeah it's not for everyone but it makes you a better driver. Because of that I wish more people would give it a try.

    Leave a comment:


  • Saluki89
    replied
    I've done some pretty fast low level flying in my aviation days but I'll never get on a bike. Props to those who do but it's not for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aidokea
    commented on 's reply
    That is a direct apples-to-apples comparison, before any lights/siren/radio are added.

    And I don't care about the rate that tires and brakes wearing out, I care about what performance they are capable of.

    In addition to weighing nearly 200 pounds more and having much less power, the Harley-Davidson FLHTP also has crap suspension, crap brakes, crap ergonomics, crap geometry, and a crap frame. It even uses crap BIAS PLY tires, in the year 2020!
    Last edited by Aidokea; 01-15-2020, 12:58 PM.

  • 9L81
    replied
    Originally posted by Aidokea View Post

    Interesting.

    Since energy equals mass times the square of velocity, I just looked up the actual test weights from the 2020 MSP test report. The BMW R 1250 RT-P weighs 650 pounds. The Harley-Davidson FLHTP weighs 844 pounds- nearly 200 pounds more than the BMW.

    Not surprisingly, the Harley-Davidson's stopping distances were longer.

    Like I said, this is officer safety stuff...
    Is that loaded down with all the LE equipment or just the basic bike before lights, siren, radio, racks etc? Either way nearly 200lbs is significant. Imagine how much more that wears the HD brakes/tires and associated parts out.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aidokea
    replied
    Originally posted by L-1 View Post

    Not to hijack the thread, but this reminds me of another issue those of you who are bike cops should be aware of.

    Many years back, my agency was called to invesgate a fatal traffic collision involving a local agency bike cop responding to a non-emergency call, and a motorist who made a left turn in front of him. Everyone's first thought was that this would be a clean issue - the civilian driver failed to yield right of way when she turned left in front of the bike cop. Turned out there was a lot more to it.

    When stripped naked and on the coroner's scales, the officer himself was excessively obese and 80 pounds over the manufacturer's safe riding weight for his motorcycle. Add the weight of his uniform, body armor, leather gear, boots, helmet leather jacket, weapon, radio and other equipment, and he was almost 150 pounds over the safe riding weight for his motor.

    We determined that had he been within the safe riding weight, he would have been able to stop in time, there would have been no crash with the driver who turned in front of him and he would still be alive.

    This gave us pause, as all our guys rode the same BMW bikes. We went back and weighed every one of our motor officers with all their gear on. All of our motor officers were skinny guys who looked iike they had been on a starvation diet for months, yet with all their Bat Man gear on they weighed around five pounds under the safe riding weight for their bikes.

    If you ride departmental motors, check the safe riding weight for your bikes, then weigh yourself with all your equipment on. Are you within safe limits? If not, time to lose some weight or get off the bike.

    Interesting.

    Since energy equals mass times the square of velocity, I just looked up the actual test weights from the 2020 MSP test report. The BMW R 1250 RT-P weighs 650 pounds. The Harley-Davidson FLHTP weighs 844 pounds- nearly 200 pounds more than the BMW.

    Not surprisingly, the Harley-Davidson's stopping distances were longer.

    Like I said, this is officer safety stuff...
    Last edited by Aidokea; 01-15-2020, 03:31 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • L-1
    replied
    Originally posted by retired1995 View Post

    Department eventually went over to Kawasakis, first the 900cc then the 1000cc. Rockets on wheels, compared to the HD products. But that brought on other problems, including a couple of dead cops due to excessive speed and/or acceleration issues.
    Not to hijack the thread, but this reminds me of another issue those of you who are bike cops should be aware of.

    Many years back, my agency was called to invesgate a fatal traffic collision involving a local agency bike cop responding to a non-emergency call, and a motorist who made a left turn in front of him. Everyone's first thought was that this would be a clean issue - the civilian driver failed to yield right of way when she turned left in front of the bike cop. Turned out there was a lot more to it.

    When stripped naked and on the coroner's scales, the officer himself was excessively obese and 80 pounds over the manufacturer's safe riding weight for his motorcycle. Add the weight of his uniform, body armor, leather gear, boots, helmet leather jacket, weapon, radio and other equipment, and he was almost 150 pounds over the safe riding weight for his motor.

    We determined that had he been within the safe riding weight, he would have been able to stop in time, there would have been no crash with the driver who turned in front of him and he would still be alive.

    This gave us pause, as all our guys rode the same BMW bikes. We went back and weighed every one of our motor officers with all their gear on. All of our motor officers were skinny guys who looked iike they had been on a starvation diet for months, yet with all their Bat Man gear on they weighed around five pounds under the safe riding weight for their bikes.

    If you ride departmental motors, check the safe riding weight for your bikes, then weigh yourself with all your equipment on. Are you within safe limits? If not, time to lose some weight or get off the bike.


    Leave a comment:


  • Aidokea
    replied
    Originally posted by retired1995 View Post
    I remember lighting up on a drag race in downtown, then pursuing the first vehicle to turn off, couple of blocks to the on ramp of the Interstate, then about 4 miles before he pulled over. I parked the Kawasaki 900 and did my thing with the driver of a Corvette. He asked what I was riding because he couldn't outrun me. Told me he was pushing 130. I still had one up-shift to go before he pulled over. Took a few minutes for the shakes to go away so I could issue a summons. Literally, I had no idea I was going that fast.
    You weren't.

    The civilian Kawasaki Z1 900 put out about 65 horsepower, and was capable of a top speed of about 130 mph (in top gear of course), naked. The Z1-P (Police) fairing/windshield and hard luggage, would have knocked an easy 10mph off of that. If you were in 4th gear (for 4 miles?) you were probably doing no more than about 100 mph.

    Motorcycles have come a long way in the last 40 years- my last motorcycle in 100% stock form, was capable of 104 mph...in first gear. With modern tires, brakes, suspension, frames, geometry, ergonomics, electronic rider aids, rider safery gear, and easy access to competent formal rider training and track days, it's never been safer to go fast on a motorcycle than it is today.
    Last edited by Aidokea; 01-15-2020, 01:54 AM.

    Leave a comment:

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