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Bicuspid Valve disqualifier?

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  • Bicuspid Valve disqualifier?

    Hi, I've been a Leo a couple years, the agency I work for when they performed my physical did not have issue with my heart.


    A few years ago I had a doctor clear me saying I could do anything physical, just maybe when I'm 70-90 I might need a valve replacement.

    Would other departments, or in my interest, the federal government DQ me for simply having bicuspid Valve, even tho it will never be a problem?

    Edit: I lift weights and run, so I have no physical restrictions
    Last edited by OFCJ1993; 04-30-2019, 03:36 PM.

  • #2
    There are two issues here:

    First, with respect to your current employment - Because you are already employed, under the Americans With Disabilities Act, your current employer can't raise this matter until such time as your condition is such that it prevents you from performing the duties of your position. Under the circumstamces, that does not seem to be a problem.

    The rules for prospective employers are a little different. They can medically disqualify an applicant who has a medical condition that may potentially interfere with their ability to perform the duties of the job, or pose a potential risk of exacerbation or reinjury on the job, needlessly costing the employer in money paid to workers compensation, disability retirement anmd death benefits.

    Go here http://lib.post.ca.gov/Publications/...kmark#valvular and read the section on Valvular issues. While it is the California standard, the medical principles supporting it do no stop at the state border and I suspect you will find other state and federal agencies follow similar standards. If you can decipher all the medical jargon, it may provide what you are looking for.
    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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    • #3
      Originally posted by L-1 View Post
      There are two issues here:

      First, with respect to your current employment - Because you are already employed, under the Americans With Disabilities Act, your current employer can't raise this matter until such time as your condition is such that it prevents you from performing the duties of your position. Under the circumstamces, that does not seem to be a problem.

      The rules for prospective employers are a little different. They can medically disqualify an applicant who has a medical condition that may potentially interfere with their ability to perform the duties of the job, or pose a potential risk of exacerbation or reinjury on the job, needlessly costing the employer in money paid to workers compensation, disability retirement anmd death benefits.

      Go here http://lib.post.ca.gov/Publications/...kmark#valvular and read the section on Valvular issues. While it is the California standard, the medical principles supporting it do no stop at the state border and I suspect you will find other state and federal agencies follow similar standards. If you can decipher all the medical jargon, it may provide what you are looking for.
      Thank you for the link, it seemed to say if I can do a stress test and am not symptomatic, It would not be a issue. I looked up what the army policy is, basically same thing. I guess I wanted to check, cause well I guess I talked to the wrong pessimist, thanks again

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      • J2H
        J2H commented
        Editing a comment
        You'll have to take an initial physical and a physical every year, incl EKG. As long as the doc clears you, you should be fine.

    • #4
      It did not effect me obtaining an FAA Class 1 Medical Certificate, or becoming an 1811. I believe it is a somewhat common problem in society, just not a lot of people are diagnosed. As long as your doc doesn't see issues, you will probably be fine.

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      • #5
        Usually a bicuspid heart valve does not cause major problems in a young healthy individual eventually you will likely need a heart valve replacement when you are much older but there are increased risks when you have this congenital defect. Bicuspid valves are at increased risk of both viral and bacterial infections. A simple staph infection can be a major problem in even the healthiest of persons. The resistance of these bacteria to antibiotics in the last few decades has complicated the treatment of infections immensely.

        A bicuspid valve has an increased risk of becoming infected with not only bacteria but also with viruses. These viral infections (viral endocarditis) can remain hidden even in a healthy and active individual until it has progresses to the point where the person presents with heart failure. Running and conditioning can actually even hide the illness even more so because the person has increased their cardiac output and improved their lung capacity. That might sound counterintuitive to you but it really isn't. It just takes longer for the heart to decompensate to where heart failure is significant enough to cause the symptoms to become evident.

        You need to make sure you follow up regularly with your physician and be very diligent with treating any open wounds (you are at an increased risks just from confrontations with suspects, automobile accidents, saving an individual from a dangerous situation). You will most likely live a fairly healthy life without any problems but you are at a slightly increased risk of needing a valve replacement even in your young age and the possible cost of this occurrence as well as a career ending medical disability are going to be paid in insurance premiums for the rest of your life. . I had my father in law with a mitral valve regurgitation who had replacement at age 74 and he lived another 7 years before passing away. I have a brother in law who has been disabled since his early 30's because he also had mitral valve regurgitation and contracted viral endocarditis in his mid 20's. My wife also has mitral valve regurgitation and is living a normal healthy life although she had several episodes of symptomatic sinus tachycardia (her blood pressure dropped way low because her heart was racing as 180 beats per minute). I would suggest you minimize caffeine use and certain over the counter medications that say not to use if you have a history of heart problems. I am not saying you can't use them. Just that if you suddenly don't feel right someday you might want to check your pulse. Given your young and healthy I suspect your pulse is in the low 50's. Hope this explains why obtaining another job might be more difficult to do with a pre existing congenital valvular heart disease. The law prevents them from denying you coverage but it still is a consideration when hiring a potential employee even if it does not seem serious right now. Hope this helped.

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