Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Fentanyl exposures

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Fentanyl exposures

    This is real scary stuff to me. When I was working the great fears were TB and needles. I hope the officer has a rapid and full recovery.

    Question: Has anyone heard of any science regarding long term health effects/hazards of fentanyl?
    An Iowa police officer was carrying out a traffic stop over the weekend when he was exposed to an unknown substance that’s suspected of being fentanyl, authorities said Monday.
    Harry S. Truman, (1884-1972)
    “Never kick a fresh turd on a hot day.”

    Capt. E.J. Land USMC,
    “Just remember – life is hard. But it’s one hell of a lot harder if you’re stupid.

    George Washington, (1732-1799)
    "I hope I shall possess firmness and virtue enough to maintain what I consider the most enviable of all titles, the character of an honest man."

    Originally posted by Country_Jim
    ... Thus far, I am rooting for the zombies.

  • #2
    Realistically, the fentanyl scare is overblown, like most things in the media. Fentanyl has to get into your system in order to be a problem. If it does, then yea, you can go out like a light, but many, many of the exposures you hear about are psychosomatic. Guys find a suspicious powder, somebody says its fentanyl and all of sudden they feel woozy. Might even pass out.

    We've been handling fentanyl for years before this current big scare happened. We just didn't know it back then. Having fentanyl be this scary monster of a drug fits several sides agendas and here we are.

    Now, I'm not saying don't take precautions around. It is and can be a deadly drug if you get enough of it into your system. I just saying that you don't need a positive pressure hazmat suit to handle it either.
    Originally posted by kontemplerande
    Without Germany, you would not have won World War 2.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Langford PR View Post
      This is real scary stuff to me. When I was working the great fears were TB and needles. I hope the officer has a rapid and full recovery.

      Question: Has anyone heard of any science regarding long term health effects/hazards of fentanyl?
      This happened in the town where I went to college & lived for 2 yrs. I used to know a lot of the officers there but not any more. Both of my sisters live within 20 miles of Ft Dodge & one works in the town ...................Scary as hell .

      "routine" traffic stop leading to an arrest and inventory of the contents of the car for tow. Heads to the jail with prisoner and starts feeling woozy (jail about 10 blocks from the traffic stop) Calls for assistance and basically passes out at the entrance of the sally port with his foot on the break .

      Ambulance /FD arrive from station 8 blocks from the jail ..........administers 2 doses of Narcan (in at least one of the videos I have seen you can hear the paramedic state "This isn't looking good") Hospital is about 1.5 miles away where he gets at least 4 more Narcan before he comes around


      The officer is doing fine................was released from the hospital the next day and is recovering at home
      Last edited by Iowa #1603; 03-07-2019, 07:27 AM.
      Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

      My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

      Comment


      • #4
        I can speak as a cop and 40 year paramedic. I've administered fentanyl many times in the field and the ED. Yes, it's potent, 100 times more potent than morphine. Correct, that's why it's dispensed in microgram (1,000,000th of a gram) amounts, vs. morphine given in milligrams. Yes, it can be absorbed through the skin but requires a liquid carrier or gel to do so (think patches). Hard to OD from a patch, it's designed to remain in place for a couple days at a time. Cops have received nitroglycerin in paste form when doing CPR (that's why we teach to wipe the chest dry before starting compressions.)Worse that will happen is a headache. You MAY get a buzz from an incidental touch of fentanyl paste but that's also why we wear gloves.

        This stuff is not like sarin or ricin. A whiff will not do anything. Don't do the TV sampling of drugs by tasting it. Wear gloves...we all know we like to look bad with the black gloves. If you can see something at a scene floating in the air, you don't need to be there. Chemical suicides in cars were a big thing a few years back and we did not have anywheres near the panic we see now with a fentanyl overdose. The stuff in the patient WILL NOT leach out and attack you.

        I was in the business when AIDs (HTLV3) first hit the scene. As a health care provider, you have to WORK at getting an AIDs exposure. Yet we saw this at the time:



        This is from an incident in Florida earlier this week. One deputy and two firefighters had apparent anxiety attacks. Feeling sick does not equal a shot of narcan.

        If I was still on the street, I'd be worried about...TB...norovirus....measles.....influenza. These can reach out and touch you unseen. Remember to wash your hands BEFORe and AFTER using the can. Your car steering wheel, microphone and keyboard all have worse bugs on them than a possible fentanyl exposure (I know, I cultured them as part of a paper I did).

        Stay SAFE out there.

        Comment


        • #5
          It’s such an overblown issue that our county crime lab has instructed ALL agencies NOT to field test or handle it. It all goes to the lab in safe packaging now. Yeah...nothing to it.

          Ive talked to a few cops who’ve had exposures, not fake ones. It’s a danger to cops and K9s. Play with it at your own peril. Listen to the pro-drug naysayers...
          Now go home and get your shine box!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
            It’s such an overblown issue that our county crime lab has instructed ALL agencies NOT to field test or handle it. It all goes to the lab in safe packaging now. Yeah...nothing to it.

            Ive talked to a few cops who’ve had exposures, not fake ones. It’s a danger to cops and K9s. Play with it at your own peril. Listen to the pro-drug naysayers...
            Our state crime lab has done the same.

            The video above shows what happens when you make a mistake around the stuff...........................we have also had a couple k9's exposed here in Iowa in the last few months. I think ALL handlers in the state are carrying NARCAN now for their partners
            Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important

            My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
              It’s such an overblown issue that our county crime lab has instructed ALL agencies NOT to field test or handle it. It all goes to the lab in safe packaging now. Yeah...nothing to it.

              Ive talked to a few cops who’ve had exposures, not fake ones. It’s a danger to cops and K9s. Play with it at your own peril. Listen to the pro-drug naysayers...
              Same here. All drug evidence returned from the lab that tests for fentanyl is clearly marked on the packaging as such and it's highly recommended that the heat-sealed packages not be opened unless absolutely necessary.

              People can brush it off as being less dangerous than advertised or officers who have been exposed as having psychosomatic reactions but I'm gonna err on the side of caution, thanks.
              "He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you."
              -Friedrich Nietzsche

              Comment


              • #8
                I have no idea, no informed opinion about the stuff. I'm naturally paranoid about all unknown substances though.
                As I understand it, these opioids act very rapidly. So phillyrube how about a clue? What are the rapid onset exposure symptoms, in practical and real terms? I know that psychosomatic reactions are forms of psychogenic shock and can be treated and almost instantly reversed by mechanical shock treatment methods ->lying down flat and elevating your legs. More info please?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Constricted pupils. Shortness of breath. Rapid pulse, loss of consciousness, labored breathing, no breathing, death.
                  Now go home and get your shine box!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
                    Constricted pupils. Shortness of breath. Rapid pulse, loss of consciousness, labored breathing, no breathing, death.
                    Any time frame to go with that? (That **** sounds darned spooky. But so are a lot of the people who play in that cesspool.)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Like any overdose, it depends on the amount and the method of ingestion. People wear fentanyl patches for days, with a large amount on them, Clinical trials have shown a person can wear several patches and not overdose. In order to ingest the drug, it must be absorbed through a mucus membrane, such as the mouth or lungs, or direct injection. In an enclosed space, with visible powder about, I would gear up. In a car, don't see the need. Stuff is like cocaine or heroin, except far more potent. Inhale the dust and yes, there is the possibility of an overdose. Get it on your skin and use alcohol based skin cleaner, and yes, you can get a dose.

                      We were in more danger from the chemical suicides in cars we saw a few years back. Much more dangerous.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CCCSD View Post
                        Constricted pupils. Shortness of breath. Bradycardia, loss of consciousness, labored breathing, no breathing, death.
                        Fixed it for you.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by retired137 View Post

                          Fixed it for you.
                          I think you meant tachycardia?

                          phillyrube "Get it on your skin and use alcohol based skin cleaner, and yes, you can get a dose." !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Very good to know. Most hand sanitizers contain alcohol. I carry a bottle of rubbing alcohol in my kit and slosh liberally after incidents.

                          BTW, a tip for paranoid people like me. I pour some rubbing alcohol on my hand and rub thoroughly after any questionable contact. I also scrub down the steering wheel, shifter and any other surfaces commonly touched by other officers. Better safe than sorry.
                          Last edited by BetteNoireX; 05-11-2019, 08:31 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            What about fentanyl analogs like carfentanil? Isn't this stuff even 1000 times stronger? I read somewhere that fentanyl analogs were present for around 20% of all opioid deaths. And in these deaths the analogs were the cause of death in over 90% of cases.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by iconoclaste View Post
                              What about fentanyl analogs like carfentanil? Isn't this stuff even 1000 times stronger? I read somewhere that fentanyl analogs were present for around 20% of all opioid deaths. And in these deaths the analogs were the cause of death in over 90% of cases.
                              Carfentanil was primarily designed for large animal veterinary uses, so it's much more potent than even fentanyl. While I have personally see it a few times in my area, fentanyl is still much more common (even more so than straight heroin anymore, in fact).

                              The biggest issues when it comes to overdoses seem to be drug tolerance in nature...they don't get the high from heroin, so they seek out fentanyl. When the fentanyl stops giving them the high, they increase the dosage. And many users will openly admit that they will seek out what they've OD'd on in the past because they know it's "the good s***."
                              "He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you."
                              -Friedrich Nietzsche

                              Comment

                              MR300x250 Tablet

                              Collapse

                              What's Going On

                              Collapse

                              There are currently 8110 users online. 415 members and 7695 guests.

                              Most users ever online was 19,482 at 11:44 AM on 09-29-2011.

                              Welcome Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X