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Federal Cop --- Which Health Insurance Should I Choose?

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  • Federal Cop --- Which Health Insurance Should I Choose?

    I'm a new federal cop. Which health insurance should I choose?

    Background: I'm single, 0 dependants. Im very healthy and dont go to the doctor... havent been in probably 10 years... If I get sick, I just deal with it.

    So basically, I'm looking for something that is extremely low cost, would cover me in the case of an emergency. I would also like to visit a dentist once a year for a cleaning/inspection and a filling here and there....

    Any tips? This is all extremely overwhelming....

  • scotty_appleton814
    commented on 's reply
    You there Sir.... I am so jealous of your health insurance costs.... I was soo born wayyyyyyyyyyyyy too late. Here I am squirreling away in my 457 for my health care cost......Continue to enjoy that retire for you.. enjoy some for me. I only have 23 years left!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! IL Tier 2 pension.

  • Retired96
    replied
    Being retired from LASD I am so lucky in that Los Angeles County after 25 years of service pay 100 percent of my health, dental and vision..Been retired for 22 years and I have not paid one cent for the health care coverage for me and my wife..

    Leave a comment:


  • PeteBroccolo
    replied
    "reils49 commented
    01-11-2019, 07:05 AM
    I thought healthcare was free up there?"
    Yes, and no. GP, Dentists, and whatever DO charge, and we do have to pay for prescriptions, but a lot of stuff IS covered. Yes, there are times that it is tough to get surgeries done, due to waiting lists. Health delivery is also a Provincial (like a State, but not quite) responsibility, but funded by the Federal Government.

    The RCMP USED TO have its own Health system, or at least billing payment, so we would go in, get something done, sign a paper, and walk out, without much else to do. I also had extra coverage for my family that did not cost me anything, which I could have up-graded, but it would have simply covered semi-private, up to private, room cost for a hospital stay, and the basic no-cost plan was more than sufficient for us living in Saskatchewan.

    Just before I retired in late 2010, the Force transitioned to our members falling under Provincial health care, so all the active-duty members, and even retirees like me, had to get Health ID cards for the Province in which they / we reside. I signed up for a retiree health care plan, but even the basic level now requires me to pay some amount annually, plus some cost per issue, but nothing that will break me or my wife.

    Be safe, you turkeys!

    Leave a comment:


  • westside popo
    replied
    If you're a veteran and a cheap SOB. You can get the cheapest option they offer then go to the VA for your medical needs for free.

    If you have a medical emergency and no VA around, you can use that insurance just like the rest of the population. Then again the VA may help with that also. Never tried to use that option.

    The VA will charge you a co-pay for non service connected issues unless you have insurance.

    I always preferred the PPO type insurance over the HMOs. HMOs were cheaper but they had special requirements and if you didn't do them you would pay more out of pocket.

    Leave a comment:


  • not.in.MY.town
    replied
    Originally posted by Ratatatat View Post
    First of all, just because you're young and healthy today doesn't mean that's how it will always be. I've seen many people have to deal with very sudden and unexpected health issues and often in their 30s and 40s. And if there's a job-related injury, I can tell you firsthand that OWCP is mostly a bad joke, especially when you start asking how to get reimbursed for $1,200 injections. I can also tell you a couple of horror stories of people I worked with who were severely injured on the job by criminals, could no longer work, and were basically told so sad, too bad, you'll need to sue the bad guy if you want relief (one person did eventually get a medical retirement but not until he hired an attorney and even that took a couple of years).

    Like everything in life, you get what you pay for. Maybe Plan C (as in cheapo) works for you now but someday, as you age, or have a spouse, or start a family, you'll want better coverage. I say this because we had a child in the ICU a few years ago and the bill, for one week, was $40K. Luckily my spouse has good coverage and between both our plans we had no liability. There is an open season to change benefit plans every November.

    My real advice? Date people who work in public education, or for an insurance company. They seem to have the best coverage (ironic, isn't it, to see insurance take care of it's own, when they go to such lengths to let the insured flap in the wind....)

    And you may want to re-think once a year dental visits. There's a term for those who only go once a year: dog breath.
    Only 40K for a week in ICU? Wow. Where was this? Mexico?

    My daughter had an appendectomy at a hospital in New Jersey last year. Arrived at the ER at 3 am, blood tests and CT scan done, laparoscopic surgery performed at 7 am, discharged at 11 am the same day (with a prescription for antibiotics and oxycodone. go figure). The hospital bill alone was over 66K...and then another 15K or so from individual doctors (ER doctor, surgeon, anesthesiologist, radiologist, heck even a pathologist who checked her appendix tissue for cancer). I shudder to think how much the bill would have been for a ruptured appendix and a week-long hospital stay.

    I'm fortunate to have good health benefits through my department (no premium) so I only had to pay my family out-of-pocket max for the calendar year (3K)...but someone without health insurance or a higher out-of-pocket max would have been screwed.

    If nothing else, at least get the most basic (lowest premium) plan...and ideally have an amount equal to your annual out-of-pocket max in savings (for a worst-case scenario). I also recommend setting up a Health Savings Account on your own. Just establish it (there are completely free ones out there), you don't even have to fund it until you actually want to use it, but it will provide great tax benefits and help you save for future health care expenses.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ratatatat
    replied
    First of all, just because you're young and healthy today doesn't mean that's how it will always be. I've seen many people have to deal with very sudden and unexpected health issues and often in their 30s and 40s. And if there's a job-related injury, I can tell you firsthand that OWCP is mostly a bad joke, especially when you start asking how to get reimbursed for $1,200 injections. I can also tell you a couple of horror stories of people I worked with who were severely injured on the job by criminals, could no longer work, and were basically told so sad, too bad, you'll need to sue the bad guy if you want relief (one person did eventually get a medical retirement but not until he hired an attorney and even that took a couple of years).

    Like everything in life, you get what you pay for. Maybe Plan C (as in cheapo) works for you now but someday, as you age, or have a spouse, or start a family, you'll want better coverage. I say this because we had a child in the ICU a few years ago and the bill, for one week, was $40K. Luckily my spouse has good coverage and between both our plans we had no liability. There is an open season to change benefit plans every November.

    My real advice? Date people who work in public education, or for an insurance company. They seem to have the best coverage (ironic, isn't it, to see insurance take care of it's own, when they go to such lengths to let the insured flap in the wind....)

    And you may want to re-think once a year dental visits. There's a term for those who only go once a year: dog breath.

    Leave a comment:


  • reils49
    commented on 's reply
    I thought healthcare was free up there?

  • not.in.MY.town
    replied
    If you want super low cost, go with the DTCS plan - Duct tape and chicken soup.

    If it's broken or bleeds, fix it with duct tape. Anything else, have a bowl of chicken soup.

    Leave a comment:


  • J2H
    replied
    I have BCBS, covers my FEHB needs and basic dental (free cleanings 2x a year). I use Benefeds (FEDVIP) for dental and vision.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aerohead
    replied
    Originally posted by m.p.c View Post
    Federal insurance sucks.
    Whhhhhhhhhhaaaaaaaaaaaaaattttttttttttttttttt?!?!! I thought they had the best coverage - that changed??

    Leave a comment:


  • BP3
    replied
    BCBS Basic plan 111 if you are relatively healthy, not married, no kids. Accepted everywhere and about 150 a month. Great coverage and the deductible is not so expensive it’s unheard of.

    dental and vision will be separate.

    As others gave said, YMMV and location makes a big difference.

    Leave a comment:


  • orlandofed5-0
    replied
    Do you want a local or national plan? Low cost means higher out of pocket costs and doesn't always translate to better just because "you're healthy".

    Leave a comment:


  • CCCSD
    replied
    Originally posted by Exbpa340 View Post

    The below applies to federal employees (not contractors)..

    1 - The Federal government doesn’t give you an allotment like many local government positions. It covers approximately 75 percent of the premiums regardless of plan and cost. So if you get a plan that is $800 a month your portion would be around $200. This continues through retirement.

    2 - Dental is a separate issue and you will have to come out of pocket for any dental coverage.

    3 - Many plans tend to be geographical. I am located in California and use Kaiser. It is a little expensive but has been excellent. If I were in your situation I would think about a PPO (like Blue Cross/Shield). You may have a little more out of pocket if you go to the doctor but (at least when I had them) you have greater flexibility. If you get injured... say a knee injury and you know it’s pretty bad you can make an appointment directly with a specialist. These plans can get cost prohibitive for a family though.
    This.

    Leave a comment:


  • m.p.c
    replied
    Originally posted by PeteBroccolo View Post
    Your Agency has no plan / provider you can join, or HR / Health Services office to consult?! Yikes - sorry, my Canadianism was showing!
    Agencies do have providers, there are a few different federal employee health benefit options. It's up to the employee to choose which they want for themselves or family. Some agencies do a better job than others in providing seminars and etc on the pros and cons between providers. Like anything else, one needs to do their homework in assessing what is best for them.

    Leave a comment:

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