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I.E. struggles to recruit police ( SB, Riverside, CA)

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  • I.E. struggles to recruit police ( SB, Riverside, CA)

    http://www.dailybulletin.com/news/ci_5725110

    By Leonor Vivanco, Staff Writer
    Inland Valley Daily Bulletin
    Article Launched:04/22/2007 01:00:00 AM PDT

    FONTANA - From freeway billboards and job fairs to the Web and the airwaves, they're trying to get your attention.
    Various law-enforcement agencies are competing against one another for one hot commodity - new officers to fill their vacancies. It seems every police department is looking to hire officers.

    Some police departments are getting more creative in attracting potential candidates to serve and protect.

    The Fontana City Council on Tuesday evening will be asked to pay a marketing company, Epic Productions, $49,750 to design and produce DVDs, public-service announcements and pamphlets, and develop a Web site for the Police Department's recruiting program.

    "What this marketing program is designed to do is create an interest in the Police Department," said Capt. Rodney Jones.

    Recruiting new officers is a national problem, said Larry Gaines, chairman of Cal State San Bernardino's criminal justice department.

    "All departments right now are having a great deal of difficulty in meeting their demands," he said.

    With the unemployment rate fairly low, there are fewer people out there competing for jobs, reducing the applicant pool, he said.

    The International Association of Chiefs of Police in December released a law-enforcement action agenda for Congress, asking lawmakers to establish and fund new programs and enhance others.

    In its list of recommendations, the association said "it has become increasingly difficult to attract qualified personnel to law enforcement because of the higher compensation, more traditional work schedules, and less stressful working conditions available in other careers."

    The association wants to see a new program modeled after the Troops to Teachers program to encourage military personnel to go into law enforcement after they leave the service.

    Fontana, meanwhile, is trying to recruit people from the community, and city officials have allocated $60,000 in this year's budget to boost those efforts.

    Of 194 sworn police-officer positions, there are 15 to 20 vacancies, Jones said. For every 100 applicants, the Police Department hires one or two officers after a rigorous screening process.

    The Police Department will also begin targeting a younger age group, 16- to 20-year-olds. Previously, the emphasis was on 19- and 20-year-olds.

    The reason for the change?

    "We found that people either made life choices that are not acceptable to us ... or they had a good track record as far as life experience but they already decided what they want to do for the rest of their lives," Jones said.

    One goal is to get more police explorers into the program starting at age 14, said Special Operations Officer Trish Coyle. That way, they can transition into cadets at age 18 and two years later be eligible to go to the academy.

    "If we catch them early, then we can mold them into the officers that we want to have in the department," Coyle said.

    Police officials have also met with faith-based organizations and talked to students at Chaffey College to recruit officers.

    In addition to offering competitive salary and benefits, police departments use other tools to get the upper hand in recruiting.

    Fontana police officers can get $500 for recruiting someone who gets hired. Officers can also take advantage of the city's Fontana Employee/Teacher Homeownership Program and get a loan that can later be forgiven and used to buy a home.

    Fontana also has a good reputation, said Officer Casey Mutter, who was sworn in in March. "All I heard was nothing but good things, how respectable the department was," he said.

    Being an officer was the career the 25-year-old had in mind since he was a kid.

    "It's just the excitement and getting out and interacting with the public," he said.

    Meanwhile, San Bernardino offers newly hired officers a $2,500 signing bonus and lateral officers $5,000. They also can get $2,000 in a relocation package if they are at least 90 miles away from the station.

    The San Bernardino Police Department has 10 vacancies out of 330 officer positions, said Lt. Mark Garcia. He said the department is confident they can be filled by the end of the fiscal year.

    San Bernardino has one billboard on Interstate 215, and another one is planned for Interstate 10. Ads air on two Inland Empire radio stations, and there's a Web site - www.joinsbpd.org.

    Another selling point, Garcia said, is that San Bernardino is a "place that someone can come and make a difference in our city."

  • #2
    Yet they turn away good applicants all the time over petty BS.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Matto
      Yet they turn away good applicants all the time over petty BS.
      Sounds like it, just think what it would be like working for them. Some of these depts. don't understand why they can't get the people they want. Good depts. have no problem getting recruits .
      "Laws that forbid the carrying of arms. . . disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes. . . Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man." - Thomas Jefferson

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Matto
        Yet they turn away good applicants all the time over petty BS.
        Care to explain your definition of "petty BS."?

        I have lived and worked in this region for forty years and am extremenly happy to see that there is an increase in the standards of personnel applying for LEO jobs in the Inland Empire region of Southern California.

        Thirty or so years ago a great number of new hires were less than desirable and it took some time to weed them out and get back on track.

        The quality of officers hitting the streets now reflect the upper most eschelon of the finest calibre of personnel available. Candidates who have CLEAN pasts and STRONG desires to serve their respective communities with dignity and professionalism.
        Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence!

        [George Washington (1732 - 1799)]

        Comment


        • #5
          I'd rather work shorthanded with only the very finest than run fully-staffed with a bunch of people who have issues.
          Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

          I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

          Comment


          • #6
            I used to work in that area, for one of the departments mentioned. The pay was good, the action was there... but the agency was a horrible place to work. Bad supervisors, incompetent managers, zero leaders. There was a post in another thread about the lack of people wanting to go into LE because the jobs were crummy, I think that was the case in the IE. I left on good terms because I could deal with the games... but the county I work in now seems to have a much better way of policing. More progressive, professional, and relaxed. Unfortunately several agencies in the IE are just backwards in the way they do things. There are some goods ones though. I've heard good things about FPD.

            I think one of the problems was that several of the IE agencies had command staff made up of former LAPD brass who left LAPD in the early-mid 90's. I was not impressed with their management styles, nor their way of policing. The department i worked for was called the "lost LAPD division" for a while. Hopefully, things have changed.
            Get low, get ground, get tactical! Sprawl! Sprawl! Sprawl!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Matto
              Yet they turn away good applicants all the time over petty BS.
              Same thing I was thinking...
              "First of all, then we have to say the American public overwhelmingly voted for socialism when they elected President Obama." - Al Sharpton, March 21, 2010

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by SgtCHP
                Care to explain your definition of "petty BS."?

                I have lived and worked in this region for forty years and am extremenly happy to see that there is an increase in the standards of personnel applying for LEO jobs in the Inland Empire region of Southern California.

                Thirty or so years ago a great number of new hires were less than desirable and it took some time to weed them out and get back on track.

                The quality of officers hitting the streets now reflect the upper most eschelon of the finest calibre of personnel available. Candidates who have CLEAN pasts and STRONG desires to serve their respective communities with dignity and professionalism.
                I know of good guys getting tripped in the polygraph over stuff that never took place.

                Me personally, I screwed up when I was younger and got into some driving trouble. I wanted to apply at Dallas, but because I "admitted" to commiting reckless driving( was arrested, not convicted) I can't apply for 10 years. I'm not saying what I did was "petty" but here is a department hurting for recruits, hiring men and women who are in the news for conduct unbecoming, stealing wheels out of a junk yard etc

                My heart is set on on Law enforcement, I'm good friends with plenty of cops here who have told me they'd write me a letter whenever I needed it, I've been working since I was 15 and will have half my BA degree in Crim justice finished soon.

                I feel like Dallas is missing out on a "good" person, because they choose not to look at the overral situation.

                I apologize for the rant. It just sucks, but it only encourages me to work harder.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Wow!

                  ---------------
                  Last edited by alienbow; 04-20-2008, 05:41 AM.
                  www.amyandwandasrants.blogspot.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I was turned away once because of... my credit score. i separated from the military just after 9/11 and was lined up for a job... but that fell through and coulnd't find a job for almost a year... it was a struggle to feed my son and I let alone keep up on my bills. When asked why my bills wern't paid off by now during the process in 2004.. I straight up told the BI that it was hard to live and still pay my bills in full on 10.25 an hour.. but I was doing what I could (half of them were paid off by that point). I still wasn't selected despite being told I held the qualities, and certifications/experience, they were looking for

                    That.. I would consider petty stuff. Since being employed in my current department.. I've managed to pay it all off in full. I think sometimes these departments that can't find quality people need to take more of a chance. By more of a chance I don't mean forgive theft, burgulary, drugs, etc... but moreso understand that sometimes people just have a rough time... especially the way our economy was down at one point.... just because a credit score might be low don't mean the person is downright a dirtbag. only THEN would they probably find the pool is a little deeper than they thought.
                    Last edited by Mystikal; 04-22-2007, 11:46 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mystikal
                      I think sometimes these departments that can't find quality people need to take more of a chance. By more of a chance I don't mean forgive theft, burgulary, drugs, etc... but moreso understand that sometimes people just have a rough time... especially the way our economy was down at one point.... just because a credit score might be low don't mean the person is downright a dirtbag. only THEN would they probably find the pool is a little deeper than they thought.

                      I tend to agree, i have a buddy that was turned down at a local agency solely because his credit report showed a ding that turned out to be that somehow when he refinanced (to get a lower rate) was coming up that he owned 2 houses and was behind on the payments of one to the point of repossession/eviction.

                      he presented his BI with a letter form his bank explaining the error and was told "oops oh well, try us again in 2 years".

                      i dont see where these agencies are finding all the boy/girl scouts and alter boys they are trying to hire, everyone does dumb stuff or has bad things happen occsaionally, its a part of life.
                      The proper drinking of Scotch whisky is more than indulgence: it is a toast to civilization, a tribute to the continuity of culture, a manifesto of man’s determination to use the resources of nature to refresh mind and body and enjoy to the full the senses with which he has been endowed

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The greatest problem of recruitment in the Inland Empire region of California has to do with expansion.

                        The region is one of the fastest growing in the nation. The population and new housing starts are expanding so quickly the communities are outgrowing the current staffing levels of almost all law enforcement agencies and public safety services.

                        The COWBOY and GOOD OLD BOY images of some local agencies have scurried into the past and modernism is beginning to catch up.

                        The Inland Empire is one of the more reasonaby affordable areas in California, but that is quickly fading as taxes increase to make municipal improvements to accomodate the increasing populations.

                        MATTO - with all due respect, your answer has nothing to do with the IE of CA. You are addressing your issues at Dallas PD. Far from the issues in CA.
                        Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence!

                        [George Washington (1732 - 1799)]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SgtCHP
                          The greatest problem of recruitment in the Inland Empire region of California has to do with expansion.

                          The region is one of the fastest growing in the nation. The population and new housing starts are expanding so quickly the communities are outgrowing the current staffing levels of almost all law enforcement agencies and public safety services.

                          The COWBOY and GOOD OLD BOY images of some local agencies have scurried into the past and modernism is beginning to catch up.

                          The Inland Empire is one of the more reasonaby affordable areas in California, but that is quickly fading as taxes increase to make municipal improvements to accomodate the increasing populations.

                          MATTO - with all due respect, your answer has nothing to do with the IE of CA. You are addressing your issues at Dallas PD. Far from the issues in CA.
                          Oh I know, but this is the same song and dance all departments are putting on, same article, the departments just change.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SgtCHP
                            Care to explain your definition of "petty BS."?
                            Smokers. Because being a smoker makes me incapable of doing the job. Bull**** poly "lies." I've never touched a drug in my life...yet the poly says I have?!? Bad reference from an ******* ex-boyfriend/girlfriend. I can name quite a few.
                            Considerably.....

                            83.9 on the Jeff Co. test! Woohoo!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by amblnc38
                              Smokers. Because being a smoker makes me incapable of doing the job. Bull**** poly "lies." I've never touched a drug in my life...yet the poly says I have?!? Bad reference from an ******* ex-boyfriend/girlfriend. I can name quite a few.
                              Yup. I know one guy who took the poly with LVMPD and they ended up saying they thought he had killed someone.

                              Comment

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