Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Memorizing your jurisdiction

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Memorizing your jurisdiction

    Hey everyone...I'm not an officer although I'm up to the oral boards portion with one PD I applied for. Just wanted to get opinions on how you memorize the area of your jurisdiction when you first start.

    I also have an idea that I wrote a paper on in college that I'd like to get your opinion on also. I'm not sure if it would be possible logistically but what do you guys think about having some sort of GPS map in the cruisers? Do you think it would help learn the area or make an officer more dependent on it?

  • #2
    It's not a matter of memorizing per say. By using maps of the area, and just everyday patrol, you should get to know the streets, residences, business pretty quick
    IGNORE LIST - Banastretarlton AKA "banana boy"

    "In the fields of observation chance favors only prepared mind"
    -----Louis Pasteur

    "Sweat in training saves blood on the battlefield."

    -------Col. David "Hack" Hackworth

    On my 7 year old 2nd Grade Class wall

    ------------YOU are RESPONSIBLE for YOUR OWN ACTIONS

    Comment


    • #3
      We already run a GPS system in our cars. I can pull up the map and see a little animated police car moving along the road. It does come in handy quite often. Dispatch has the "master system" for lack of a better word that allows them to see all cars, in my car I can just see myself. It also means supervisors can call in to Dispatch and see where everyone is and such, I really don't have much of a problem, but some of the older officers aren't too fond of it. If you ask me, I'd trade the luxury of dispatch being able to direct officers to me if I'm unresponsive or getting my *** kicked over my sgt being able to see where I am. Just my .02 cents. Our Fire guys have a system that even marks hydrant location along with entry points to major businesses, as well as detailed layouts of some of our confusing apartment complexes. They're in the process of transfering it over to police.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SalemBlue
        We already run a GPS system in our cars. I can pull up the map and see a little animated police car moving along the road. It does come in handy quite often. Dispatch has the "master system" for lack of a better word that allows them to see all cars, in my car I can just see myself. It also means supervisors can call in to Dispatch and see where everyone is and such, I really don't have much of a problem, but some of the older officers aren't too fond of it. If you ask me, I'd trade the luxury of dispatch being able to direct officers to me if I'm unresponsive or getting my *** kicked over my sgt being able to see where I am. Just my .02 cents. Our Fire guys have a system that even marks hydrant location along with entry points to major businesses, as well as detailed layouts of some of our confusing apartment complexes. They're in the process of transfering it over to police.
        Wow, I never thought about it being used so that dispatch can see where all of the patrol cars are. Where were you when I wrote my paper....haha, jk.

        Yeah, I probably wouldnt like the old sup. knowing where I was all the time either. I bet the system is pretty costly though.

        Comment


        • #5
          We also have the GPS enabled mobiles in our cars. Dispatch and the supervisors have a master map and have all the cars in the city displayed on them. The map in our car only shows our location. It did not seem like a good idea at first but it's great for those times when you can't call out but have to jump out and go. At least if you call for help they know where the car is.

          As far as learning your jurisdiction you get it by working the beat and studying your map. Something that I used to do when it was slow was to ride around neighborhoods and apartment complexes and learn the street intersections and layouts.

          Comment


          • #6
            I think having a GPS is a great idea. In fact, I bought a Garmin streetPilot 2730 last year that I use for work. I am not in patrol. I am assigned to civil process and can go anywhere in a pretty big county. I suppose it is a good idea to get to know your area without a GPS first, but it is still helpful after you get to know your area. For me, I have my attention taken up for driving, listening to the radio, the CAD laptop computer, etc, so I will often use the GPS to enter several addresses at once and then go to them from closest, to next closest, etc. Even though I can find many of them without help, it helps me by allowing me to concentrate on the other things without focusing on how to get where I am going. I also used it recently when some of the patrol folks got a medical recently to a location where the address was not consistent with their addressing system. Dispatch had entered the coordinates from the wireless 911 caller. I entered them in my GPS and drove to the address. The address was so messed up that I ended up driving back a ways and leading the ambulance into the area. I also use it occasionally to get to other addresses that aren't even on the maps yet because they are so new. For those I got to our county property records, enter the coordinates shown there, and drive to the address. Some have been so convoluted without roads shown that I have even had to create a route from the new address back to the closest address shown on any databases. I have even gone so far as loading up the coordinates for the Mississippi River Mile Markers in my GPS. I figure that this summer when the Coast Guard calls and tells us they have an incident say near Mile Marker 831 on the river, I can easily determine the nearest boat launch without having to fool around with maps and charts.

            Comment


            • #7
              The first key to learning your jurisdiction is learning to read a map. Learn the major streets or roads and which way they travel. Most places have a common numbering system, so get a handle on that right away. Once you know the main roads, the secondary roads will come with time. I've worked in this county for 13 years and lived here my entire life. I still manage to find a new road I've never heard of from time to time. When that happens, my map book is my best friend.
              Originally posted by kontemplerande
              Without Germany, you would not have won World War 2.

              Comment

              MR300x250 Tablet

              Collapse

              What's Going On

              Collapse

              There are currently 4549 users online. 300 members and 4249 guests.

              Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

              Welcome Ad

              Collapse
              Working...
              X