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  • This is why I wanted to be a dispatcher...

    So THIS doesn't happen:

    Ugh

    Listen to the audio, too.

  • #2
    That was disturbing...

    Comment


    • #3
      Actually, you should just listen to the audio. The article is a gross misrepresentation of what is on the tape.
      Molly Weasley makes Chuck Norris eat his vegetables.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by willowdared
        Actually, you should just listen to the audio. The article is a gross misrepresentation of what is on the tape.
        You are right, Willow. You can only work with what you are given.

        Comment


        • #5
          It would be nice if a basic BLS course was a part of a HS curriculum or a requirement for graduation.

          I've seen other stories of 911 operators refusing help, one I remember was a motorcyclist involved in an accident, a friend called and was told off by the operator. It took a couple calls before the operator agreed to send help.

          I feel that behavior like this is analogous to an on duty officer who witnesses a violent crime and decides they would rather get lunch then deal with it.
          Last edited by itnstalln; 04-11-2007, 08:06 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by itnstalln
            It would be nice if a basic BLS course was a part of a HS curriculum or a requirement for graduation.

            I've seen other stories of 911 operators refusing help, one I remember was a motorcyclist involved in an accident, a friend called and was told off by the operator. It took a couple calls before the operator agreed to send help.

            I feel that behavior like this is analogous to an on duty officer who witnesses a violent crime and decides they would rather get lunch then deal with it.
            Here's the problem. He didn't refuse to help on the tape. He does indeed give instructions on the heimlich to the man, the man says "I tried that already!" I think that he didn't realize that what he did for his girlfriend had a name. The man basically says he's done trying, then hangs up. The dispatcher called him back after every hang-up. You will notice towards the end, the female dispatcher does finally also give directions on the heimlich, so I can't help but wonder about the rest of the story.

            I am not certified as EMD, so I am not supposed to give directions. We transfer to the fire department, and they have a printed script to follow. I've listened to plenty of people decline doing CPR, hang-up before getting directions, or are simply too hysterical to take in what you are saying.

            Unfortunately, that woman died because the man was not able to clear her airway.
            Molly Weasley makes Chuck Norris eat his vegetables.

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            • #7
              There's still something wrong with the situation. As said in the Video clip- the crude comments were edited out...

              The supervisor is still a joke it sounds like. Falls asleep all the time, found asleep the day after.

              They even showed a shot of him asleep.

              Resigned because of 'medical issues'- Like what? Narcolepsy?


              I don't know. I'm not sure about why they would have a dispatcher that can't handle calls that depend on quick thinking. I was confused as to why someone who couldn't help the guy was even answering phones...and why it took so long to get a supervisor on the phone if it was meant to be escalated.

              I dunno. Regardless of whether or not you can hear the comments in the edited audio... the whole situation is bizzare.
              Last edited by ksadek; 04-12-2007, 12:22 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ksadek
                There's still something wrong with the situation. As said in the Video clip- the crude comments were edited out...

                The supervisor is still a joke it sounds like. Falls asleep all the time, found asleep the day after.

                They even showed a shot of him asleep.

                Resigned because of 'medical issues'- Like what? Narcolepsy?
                Easy to judge from the outside, especially when you are relying on news reports with an agenda.

                It's good you want to do it "right," but don't get started by looking for what others have done "wrong." I guarentee is will come back and bite you on the hiney some day.
                Molly Weasley makes Chuck Norris eat his vegetables.

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                • #9
                  That's a disgrace. The response time was unacceptable. There's a whole number of things unanswered as far as this call goes, so I won't say too much in regards to that call. I do think the dispatcher could have done a better job of explaining what medical steps to take next. Even though the caller was obviously very upset and seemed to ignore the dispatchers requests to perform what she asked, persistence is very important. Letting that caller know how important it is to follow all the instructions and do everything the dispatcher asks to help that person until better help arrives impacts the caller a lot. When the caller realizes they could be the difference between life and death for this person, it seems to really take hold of them and gives them the extra push to get it done, focus, and follow instructions.

                  All too often I hear all these audio tapes of dispatchers and it seems like they're BOTHERED by them calling.

                  Dispatching isn't a job that's sunshine and kittens all day. People don't call us because things are going good. People call us because things are going bad. Sometimes very bad. These people call us and expect things to be all better when they call 911. Dispatchers need to be the calm in the storm. Calm, reassuring, and confident in every word they speak. The caller depends on that. If they hear a dispatcher that is nervous and sounds scared or annoyed...that transfers over and the situation only escalates.

                  I realize that veteran dispatchers get burnt out and sick of dealing with all the problems and hysterical callers and bogus calls too. I also know that you can't be the kindest in certain situations. Sometimes you have to be stern and unmoved and demand things from callers. But when it gets to the point that every phonecall you pick up is an inconvenience and when you're indifferent to the outcome of the call. It's time to hang up the headset my friend.

                  I could go on for hours about mediocre dispatchers but I'll stop my rant for now.
                  Last edited by Mays; 04-12-2007, 01:24 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mays
                    That's a disgrace. The response time was unacceptable.
                    And therein lies the real issue....beyond 11 minutes for paramedics to get there.

                    I noticed the female dispatcher didn't verify address and phone until almost 3 minutes into the call. I also noticed that the RP says he wasn't in the room when it happened, so I have to wonder what the real time frame was.

                    We always send deputies on non-breathers, for the vary reason that they may be able to beat the FD to the scene, and get CPR started, or take over.
                    Molly Weasley makes Chuck Norris eat his vegetables.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mays
                      That's a disgrace. The response time was unacceptable. There's a whole number of things unanswered as far as this call goes, so I won't say too much in regards to that call. I do think the dispatcher could have done a better job of explaining what medical steps to take next. Even though the caller was obviously very upset and seemed to ignore the dispatchers requests to perform what she asked, persistence is very important. Letting that caller know how important it is to follow all the instructions and do everything the dispatcher asks to help that person until better help arrives impacts the caller a lot. When the caller realizes they could be the difference between life and death for this person, it seems to really take hold of them and gives them the extra push to get it done, focus, and follow instructions.

                      All too often I hear all these audio tapes of dispatchers and it seems like they're BOTHERED by them calling.

                      Dispatching isn't a job that's sunshine and kittens all day. People don't call us because things are going good. People call us because things are going bad. Sometimes very bad. These people call us and expect things to be all better when they call 911. Dispatchers need to be the calm in the storm. Calm, reassuring, and confident in every word they speak. The caller depends on that. If they hear a dispatcher that is nervous and sounds scared or annoyed...that transfers over and the situation only escalates.

                      I realize that veteran dispatchers get burnt out and sick of dealing with all the problems and hysterical callers and bogus calls too. I also know that you can't be the kindest in certain situations. Sometimes you have to be stern and unmoved and demand things from callers. But when it gets to the point that every phonecall you pick up is an inconvenience and when you're indifferent to the outcome of the call. It's time to hang up the headset my friend.

                      I could go on for hours about mediocre dispatchers but I'll stop my rant for now.
                      My thoughts exactly. If one wants to deal with calm collected callers, then 911 dispatcher is not the job for them.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mays
                        That's a disgrace. The response time was unacceptable. There's a whole number of things unanswered as far as this call goes, so I won't say too much in regards to that call. I do think the dispatcher could have done a better job of explaining what medical steps to take next. Even though the caller was obviously very upset and seemed to ignore the dispatchers requests to perform what she asked, persistence is very important. Letting that caller know how important it is to follow all the instructions and do everything the dispatcher asks to help that person until better help arrives impacts the caller a lot. When the caller realizes they could be the difference between life and death for this person, it seems to really take hold of them and gives them the extra push to get it done, focus, and follow instructions.

                        All too often I hear all these audio tapes of dispatchers and it seems like they're BOTHERED by them calling.

                        Dispatching isn't a job that's sunshine and kittens all day. People don't call us because things are going good. People call us because things are going bad. Sometimes very bad. These people call us and expect things to be all better when they call 911. Dispatchers need to be the calm in the storm. Calm, reassuring, and confident in every word they speak. The caller depends on that. If they hear a dispatcher that is nervous and sounds scared or annoyed...that transfers over and the situation only escalates.

                        I realize that veteran dispatchers get burnt out and sick of dealing with all the problems and hysterical callers and bogus calls too. I also know that you can't be the kindest in certain situations. Sometimes you have to be stern and unmoved and demand things from callers. But when it gets to the point that every phonecall you pick up is an inconvenience and when you're indifferent to the outcome of the call. It's time to hang up the headset my friend.

                        I could go on for hours about mediocre dispatchers but I'll stop my rant for now.
                        You hit the nail on the head. Got my point across where I couldn't.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Are there bad/burned out dispatchers? Yes there are.

                          Are there dedicated, committed and professional dispatchers? Absolutely!

                          I think it's a shame you picked a biased report, where there may have been less then stellar behavior, but was not in the realm of negligance, as an example. Any experienced dispatcher can tell you there is always more to the story.

                          You do know this is National Public Safety Dispatcher's week?
                          Molly Weasley makes Chuck Norris eat his vegetables.

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                          • #14
                            No where.. Did I ever say that all dispatchers are bad...Ever. I don't think that at all.

                            I simply stated that I wanted to be a dispatcher because of those types of stories. I want to help, and excel where I think someone else lacked.

                            It's an experience that *I* have learned from.

                            I think you are taking it way too personally.

                            If I would have came across an article that showed a dispatcher in the hero light (which you seldom hear about) I would have posted it and said that I would have wanted to be like that.

                            Sorry you took it so personally.. but, I think someone else would have posted it eventually and could have said a lot worse.

                            I apologize for pushing any wrong buttons.



                            And I do know that- just the other day I said I wish I could be part of that.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Who cares what week it is? EVERY DAY should be a learning experience which is EXACTLY what the OP is all about. The poster even stated he wanted to be a dispatcher so he could bring something to the profession that certain other people haven't.
                              -I don't feel you honor someone by creating a physical gesture (the salute). You honor them by holding them in memory and, in law enforcement, proceeding in vigilant, ethical police work. You honor this country or deceased soldiers or whatever you're honoring when you salute a flag by thinking, feeling, and continuing a life of freedom.

                              --ArkansasRed24

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