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  • Officer and motorcyclist collide - was it a PIT?

    I searched the site but couldn't come up with any topics on this.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CH_eosvJap4

    I just saw a video where a CHP squad collides with a motorcycle. It's being portrayed online that the officer PIT'ed the motorcycle, which I'm pretty confident would be against any department's policies except in the most extreme examples. It's hard to tell from the video quality, but it looks like the squad side-swiped the bike as the bike was decelerating. Also hard to determine if the squad's brake lights were activated.

    It looks like this just hit YouTube a few days ago, and I'm not finding any articles about it yet.

    Anyone know more to the story?

  • #2
    Originally posted by orangebottle View Post
    I searched the site but couldn't come up with any topics on this.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CH_eosvJap4

    I just saw a video where a CHP squad collides with a motorcycle. It's being portrayed online that the officer PIT'ed the motorcycle, which I'm pretty confident would be against any department's policies except in the most extreme examples. It's hard to tell from the video quality, but it looks like the squad side-swiped the bike as the bike was decelerating. Also hard to determine if the squad's brake lights were activated.

    It looks like this just hit YouTube a few days ago, and I'm not finding any articles about it yet.

    Anyone know more to the story?
    Quick Google search turned up this:

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/l...528-story.html


    According to the CHP, the chase began on the eastbound 210 Freeway, when the officer turned on his emergency lights and tried to stop Garcia Martinez after he used the right shoulder to pass another vehicle on the freeway.

    The motorcyclist began to yield but then took off at high speed, eventually exiting the freeway at Archibald Avenue, according to the report.

    The chase continued on surface streets until the collision.

    "For unknown reasons, the left side of the Yamaha made contact with the right side of the patrol vehicle," the report said.

    Comment


    • #3
      I know chp has a policy that dictates exactly when it would be appropriate to ram a motorcycle. I don't recall passing on the shoulder being one of them.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for finding the article and sharing.

        I'm sure the video will be sliced and diced by many, as well as squad video. But my impression was the collision wasn't an intentional act.

        Comment


        • #5
          It wasn’t.
          Now go home and get your shine box!

          Comment


          • #6
            He cut the motorcycle off and the rider collided with the patrol car. If it would’ve been a PIT, the rider would still be airborne.

            I have no problem with it, even as a biker. Squids like that jerkoff and his friends have no business on the road. They can’t ride for ****, act like idiots and ride for all the wrong reasons.

            I’ve put on 7,000 miles in the last six weeks, currently on the seventh state, five or six states and 2500+ miles to go, and can just about count on my fingers how many sport bikes are out there with the serious riders.
            Last edited by ateamer; 06-06-2018, 10:22 PM.
            Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

            I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ateamer View Post
              He cut the motorcycle off and the rider collided with the patrol car. If it would’ve been a PIT, the rider would still be airborne.

              I have no problem with it, even as a biker. Squids like that jerkoff and his friends have no business on the road. They can’t ride for ****, act like idiots and ride for all the wrong reasons.

              I’ve put on 7,000 miles in the last six weeks, currently on the seventh state, five or six states and 2500+ miles to go, and can just about count on my fingers how many sport bikes are out there with the serious riders.
              I'm personally torn. I just didn't get it. I'm not sure exactly why he decided not to stop nor do I know why the officer decided to use a vehicle to stop a motorcycle. I'm especially annoyed about how regardless of if he was wrong that he was in handcuffs and being pushed around after a wreck...a minor wreck but still a wreck. From the look of the bike the rider likes to "stunt" so who knows what mayhem he was causing before this altercation.
              Also I'm inclined to agree with the supersport riders. They tend to be a bit more ballsy, a bit more obnoxious, fail to dress properly. As a supersport rider I want to park the bike in the garage and never touch it again when I see the stuff they get themselves into.
              Last edited by TUNEDNIMPORTED; 06-06-2018, 10:49 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                There was nothing I read in the article that appeared to indicate a need for a deadly force intervention. And stopping a MC with a squad car would be seen as such by my department, at the least. If it is somehow shown that he intentionally struck the bike, I expect he'll be out of a job, if not brought up on charges.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I lost count of how many fleeing felons on bicycles I stopped using my patrol car by cutting them off... never a word.
                  Now go home and get your shine box!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by TUNEDNIMPORTED View Post
                    ...nor do I know why the officer decided to use a vehicle to stop a motorcycle.
                    Did the patrol car strike the bike or did the bike strike the patrol car?

                    If the patrol car struck the bike was it intentional or accidental?

                    If the bike struck the patrol car, was it intentional or accidental?

                    Depending on who did what and with which and to whom, there can be vastly different scenarios here. Until we know, your assumptions are premature.


                    Originally posted by TUNEDNIMPORTED View Post
                    I'm especially annoyed about how regardless of if he was wrong that he was in handcuffs and being pushed around after a wreck.
                    I'm not annoyed at all. Look at the video again. The lone officer is surrounded by an openly hostile crowd. He handcuffs his prisoner and goes to secure him in the back seat of his patrol car, only to spot someone attempting to steal the suspect's motorcycle. He knows if he continues to put the suspect in the back seat, the motorcycle (which he is responsible for securing) will be stolen. He will have to chase the thief, allowing the crowd to free his prisoner from the back seat and now being alone and outnumbered, the officer will probably be attacked by the rest of the mob. So instead, he pulled the prisoner back and sat him on the bike. It was a wise move on the officer's part in a situation not contemplated or addressed by policy.

                    Originally posted by orangebottle View Post
                    There was nothing I read in the article that appeared to indicate a need for a deadly force intervention. And stopping a MC with a squad car would be seen as such by my department, at the least. If it is somehow shown that he intentionally struck the bike, I expect he'll be out of a job, if not brought up on charges.
                    Again,

                    Did the patrol car strike the bike or did the bike strike the patrol car?

                    If the patrol car struck the bike was it intentional or accidental?

                    If the bike struck the patrol car, was it intentional or accidental?

                    Depending on who did what and with which and to whom, there can be vastly different scenarios here. Until we know, your assumptions regarding the use of deadly fore intervention are premature. But, while we're here, let's talk about deadly force and the PIT maneuver.

                    Your comment suggests use of the PIT constitutes the use of deadly force intervention. This confuses me. As an officer you have no doubt been to school and trained to perform the PIT. Can you please tell me when departmental positions changed to blanketly declare use of the PIT to be deadly force? Based on your deadly force pronouncement we are going to have to revamp our manual and probably retrain and add more personnel our officer involved team, to have them come out for every PIT maneuver, if only for the sake of public transparency in these newly categorized "deadly force" situations.
                    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I’m betting orange isn’t even out of the academy.
                      Now go home and get your shine box!

                      Comment


                      • moparfan
                        moparfan commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Or in the academy

                    • #12
                      Originally posted by L-1 View Post
                      Your comment suggests use of the PIT constitutes the use of deadly force intervention. This confuses me. As an officer you have no doubt been to school and trained to perform the PIT. Can you please tell me when departmental positions changed to blanketly declare use of the PIT to be deadly force? Based on your deadly force pronouncement we are going to have to revamp our manual and probably retrain and add more personnel our officer involved team, to have them come out for every PIT maneuver, if only for the sake of public transparency in these newly categorized "deadly force" situations.
                      My apologies for butting in...but I read orangebottle 's post as referring to use of the PIT against a motorcycle. Not sure what you guys out in California do...but we neither train for nor does our pursuit policy allow it...because yes, it would likely result in death of the motorcyclist.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Originally posted by L-1 View Post

                        Did the patrol car strike the bike or did the bike strike the patrol car?

                        If the patrol car struck the bike was it intentional or accidental?

                        If the bike struck the patrol car, was it intentional or accidental?

                        Depending on who did what and with which and to whom, there can be vastly different scenarios here. Until we know, your assumptions are premature.




                        I'm not annoyed at all. Look at the video again. The lone officer is surrounded by an openly hostile crowd. He handcuffs his prisoner and goes to secure him in the back seat of his patrol car, only to spot someone attempting to steal the suspect's motorcycle. He knows if he continues to put the suspect in the back seat, the motorcycle (which he is responsible for securing) will be stolen. He will have to chase the thief, allowing the crowd to free his prisoner from the back seat and now being alone and outnumbered, the officer will probably be attacked by the rest of the mob. So instead, he pulled the prisoner back and sat him on the bike. It was a wise move on the officer's part in a situation not contemplated or addressed by policy.



                        Again,

                        Did the patrol car strike the bike or did the bike strike the patrol car?

                        If the patrol car struck the bike was it intentional or accidental?

                        If the bike struck the patrol car, was it intentional or accidental?

                        Depending on who did what and with which and to whom, there can be vastly different scenarios here. Until we know, your assumptions regarding the use of deadly fore intervention are premature. But, while we're here, let's talk about deadly force and the PIT maneuver.

                        Your comment suggests use of the PIT constitutes the use of deadly force intervention. This confuses me. As an officer you have no doubt been to school and trained to perform the PIT. Can you please tell me when departmental positions changed to blanketly declare use of the PIT to be deadly force? Based on your deadly force pronouncement we are going to have to revamp our manual and probably retrain and add more personnel our officer involved team, to have them come out for every PIT maneuver, if only for the sake of public transparency in these newly categorized "deadly force" situations.
                        From my riding experience and what I saw in the video it looked like the rider was leaning away from the vehicle. MEANING attempting to get to the right because the car was approaching him. This is not an assumption and is clearly pictured in the video. If you look at the slow-mo version you can see it right after they pass the pole. It should be in the news clip.

                        As far as the bike being stolen I highly doubt that was the reasoning as people generally pick up a bike after it was dropped. Also didn't this group know this guy? In this instance I would have NOT ran over to pick it up.

                        Anyways I agree with the surrounding the officer...not cool in my opinion...Hes just doing his job and IF hes wrong someone else will call him on it.

                        The only assumption being made was you saying the group was going to steal his bike.

                        Also Groucho Marx is the best....
                        Last edited by TUNEDNIMPORTED; 06-08-2018, 12:11 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Originally posted by not.in.MY.town View Post

                          My apologies for butting in...but I read orangebottle 's post as referring to use of the PIT against a motorcycle. Not sure what you guys out in California do...but we neither train for nor does our pursuit policy allow it...because yes, it would likely result in death of the motorcyclist.
                          Does it mean the police will just let them go ? Can bank robbers get away with it if they use motorcycles instead of cars as their getaway vehicles?


                          I'll contact the lieutenant to see what's the policy against motorcycles for this department.
                          Be sure to smile for the cameras.....

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Originally posted by not.in.MY.town View Post

                            My apologies for butting in...but I read orangebottle 's post as referring to use of the PIT against a motorcycle. Not sure what you guys out in California do...but we neither train for nor does our pursuit policy allow it...because yes, it would likely result in death of the motorcyclist.
                            What he said.

                            We don't train in the PIT in my department, nor is it authorized in our pursuit policy. So I admittedly don't have the experience that others may have. But I'd be surprised to see any written policy authorizing the willful use of a PIT or other vehicle intervention technique against a motorcyclist who has apparently done nothing more than commit a traffic violation (passing in the breakdown lane) then fled.


                            I’m betting orange isn’t even out of the academy.
                            I'll put up a tenner that says he is.

                            Comment

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