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  • Herzing College?

    I was looking at local colleges with Criminal Justice/Public Safety programs and found Herzing (I thought they were only Computer/IT stuff)

    Anyways, they have their 'Homeland Security and Public Safety (BSHSPS) with a Concentration in Criminal Justice' program- and I was curious if anyone has taken the coursework via Herzing. It sounds much better than the program for MATC in my area.



    Or if people have taken them anywhere else- if they recommend their college or online college.

    I may be moving in the near future (Husband is in the Military) to Coronado/San Diego Cali., Stennis, Miss., or VA Beach... So any in those areas are also possibilities.


    Thanks!

    (Sorry if this has been answered, I tried to do a search)

  • #2
    There are tons of online and private CJ programs available. Many of them advertise on O.com. They vary tremendously in quality and cost. The online versions shouldn't care where you live. If you're in a fixed location, your best bet is a local junior or community college. The tuition will be much lower and you'll be reasonably assured of qualified faculty. Don't be too impressed with a long "homeland security" course title. That degree won't get you any better job than a more plain vanilla diploma will.

    Go talk to the outfit that you envision working for when you're done with your preparation and ask them "What would make me the ideal candidate in X years?" Write down what they tell you (make a note of who you talk to), and then go do those things. When you come back, it will be very difficult for them not to take you seriously.

    By the way, Milwaukee Area Technical College (MATC) is a fine school. I know personally several people who have taught there and they are all respected trainers.
    Tim Dees, now writing as a plain old forum member, his superpowers lost to an encounter with gold kryptonite.

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    • #3
      Herzing College

      Before I spent any money on any college, I'd do a little research. The main thing you're looking for is accreditation. Is the school accredited in your state, or in another state? If it offers law enforcement type courses, would these courses be recognized by your states POST? As Tim noted, there are many colleges/universities that offer on-line courses. Some are perfectly legitimate, and offer first rate instruction. Do a little research though.

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      • #4
        The MATC I'm referring to is Madison...

        It's not that I'm impressed per se with the title.. but the Course work in that program seems the most appealing.

        I think the thing that most worries me is starting at one local college (I'd rather not do an online course) and then finding a decent one wherever I have to move.

        I suppose I can due some preamptive searching for the regions I may have to move to.

        I'll keep looking...

        Comment


        • #5
          To add to PhilipCal's post, state accreditation is usually not enough. In some states, all you need to do is register with the state department of education and you can claim state accreditation. For example, I can register with the California Department of Education as L-1's School of Reckless Eyeballing and then legitimately claim that I am a state accredited to teach reckless eyeballing. No one will recognize your degree in reckless eyeballing, even though it came from a state accredited institution.

          For your degree/credits to be recognized by government agencies or other colleges, you need to make sure your college is accredited by an accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. There are six of these accrediting agencies:

          • Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
          • New England Association of Schools and Colleges
          • North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
          • Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges
          • Western Association of Schools and Colleges
          • Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
          Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by L-1
            To add to PhilipCal's post, state accreditation is usually not enough. In some states, all you need to do is register with the state department of education and you can claim state accreditation. For example, I can register with the California Department of Education as L-1's School of Reckless Eyeballing and then legitimately claim that I am a state accredited to teach reckless eyeballing. No one will recognize your degree in reckless eyeballing, even though it came from a state accredited institution.

            For your degree/credits to be recognized by government agencies or other colleges, you need to make sure your college is accredited by an accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. There are six of these accrediting agencies:

            • Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
            • New England Association of Schools and Colleges
            • North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
            • Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges
            • Western Association of Schools and Colleges
            • Southern Association of Colleges and Schools

            Wow, I didn't know that...

            Thanks so much!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by L-1
              To add to PhilipCal's post, state accreditation is usually not enough. In some states, all you need to do is register with the state department of education and you can claim state accreditation. For example, I can register with the California Department of Education as L-1's School of Reckless Eyeballing and then legitimately claim that I am a state accredited to teach reckless eyeballing. No one will recognize your degree in reckless eyeballing, even though it came from a state accredited institution.

              For your degree/credits to be recognized by government agencies or other colleges, you need to make sure your college is accredited by an accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. There are six of these accrediting agencies:

              • Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
              • New England Association of Schools and Colleges
              • North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
              • Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges
              • Western Association of Schools and Colleges
              • Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
              Good point. There is an O.com article about online degrees here:

              The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Online College Degrees
              Tim Dees, now writing as a plain old forum member, his superpowers lost to an encounter with gold kryptonite.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Tim Dees
                Good point. There is an O.com article about online degrees here:

                The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Online College Degrees
                Oh wow. Great article.

                I need to start utilizing the articles on here more often.

                Thanks, Tim!

                Comment

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