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  • Thinking about becoming an auxilliary

    I've read a lot of great info here. Can someone give me some other forums to check out in regards to being a reserve officer? I've turned up nil with my web searches.

    Love this site BTW. Thanks in advance.


    FF

  • #2
    As Am I, Any Help Would Be Much Appreciated
    Thanks Fellas

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    • #3
      I'm planning on doing the Auxiliary thing by 2009. It started with a casual mention from my bf, thought about it and now I'm really hooked on the idea.
      Don't know how it works in your area but you could always try going down to a local PD and asking some questions to the officers there. Every opportunity you can, sneak in a question to one. I do it a lot....maybe deep down it annoys them but they will always answer the best they can.
      Never argue with idiots - they just drag you down to their level, then beat you with experience.

      Chaos, Panic and Disorder....my work here is done!

      As her tears fell at his feet, she didn't say "I Love You," what she said meant even more: I laugh, I love, I hope, I tried. I hurt, I need, I fear, I cry and I know you do the same things too. So we're really not that different, me and you.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by FlashFire
        I've read a lot of great info here. Can someone give me some other forums to check out in regards to being a reserve officer? I've turned up nil with my web searches.
        There is a fairly extensive thread on the topic here. Also, if you do a forum search for "reserve" or "reserves", I think you'll find there's been quite a bit of discussion on the subject.

        One aspect to keep in mind: I saw in the thread in the '"Meet and Greet" section that many reserves claim to have exactly the same police powers as regular, full-time officers. I've spoken to quite a few police agencies which employ reserves lately, and almost without exception, this is not true. Most agencies limit their reserves' police powers to when they are on duty, and sometimes only when they are on duty and in uniform and supervised by a regular officer. Many reserves also claim to have "exactly the same training as the regular officers." Again, while some do have this level of training, most have considerably less formal training, and some, believe it or not, have none at all.

        Depending on the laws in each state, an agency may or may not be able to grant full police powers to its reserves without the reserve officer having completed the full scope of an academy. This varies a lot from state to state and even agency to agency, so you need to inquire very specifically what powers reserve officers have where you plan to work. In my experience, one of the most common reasons that reserves get shown the door is when they decide to take some (usually unwarranted) official action while off duty, thus prematurely ending what could otherwise have been a promising career.

        Before everyone jumps on me, I'm a proponent of reserve programs. I was a reserve officer at one time. Most people become a reserve and then move on to being a regular - I did it the other way around, so there weren't any training issues. I know about Level I reserves in California, who really do have the same police powers as regulars. I also know that Level I reserves are fairly rare.

        The problem, I think, is very much the same with new reserves as with new regulars. Rookies, me included, like to indulge in fantasies about ridding the world of crime and being the admired hero for so doing. Some reserves suffer from the same daydreams, and will try to overstate their authority. Being allowed to carry a concealed firearm on the authority of your badge and ID card is not the same as having full police powers - it's more like a CCW permit through an alternative channel. And if you do act outside your authority, your agency has every right to cut you loose and leave you holding the bag for any civil penalties and/or costs of defending yourself in a lawsuit, which can eat everything you have and then some. Tread lightly here.
        Tim Dees, now writing as a plain old forum member, his superpowers lost to an encounter with gold kryptonite.

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        • #5
          Wow, it's crazy how it works in the US.

          With the RCMP, you are supervised at all times by a regular officer unless something really serious comes up. (that's what I read somewhere anyways) You cannot carry a gun, cannot drive the cruiser (auxiliaries only need a class 5) ......so pretty much you're a ride along, and a puppet doing crowd control (crowd control with no weapon in case of emergency? That sucks!)and visiting schools and doing safety checks, but it still gives you an opportunity to see what officers go through every day. The training is two days a week over a course of 4 months. Ooooh I'm so excited, I can't wait till I can join
          Never argue with idiots - they just drag you down to their level, then beat you with experience.

          Chaos, Panic and Disorder....my work here is done!

          As her tears fell at his feet, she didn't say "I Love You," what she said meant even more: I laugh, I love, I hope, I tried. I hurt, I need, I fear, I cry and I know you do the same things too. So we're really not that different, me and you.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you very much Tim.

            Comment

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