Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What is the ratio of female to male dispatchers?

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • CODE-30
    replied
    Our dept doesn't use civilians. We have 1 female, who nobody really likes and can't wait till she moves onto something else, and 9 males.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrJim911
    replied
    Generally speaking there are many more females in dispatch then men. But either are capable of doing the job. I've trained both and have seen success and failure for both sides.

    Pay is generally lower then police as far a top out. Starting pay can often be equal. But, this depends on locality, cost of living, and unions. Non pay benefits are often the same way.

    Retirement is one sided in favor of the police. Dispatchers are rarely included in early retirement incentives. Many dispatchers are not even considered public safety employees.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim Dees
    replied
    Originally posted by JPatrick
    Hmmm.... and my experience with air traffic control (purely anecdotal, mind you) is that the stress level can be similar with a lot of rather similar activities. Yet, there are, I'd say at least half males in ATC. To me, this would seem to call into question the premise that "women handle it better".

    I'm thinking that there's a cultural component to the large female skew in police dispatching.

    This would be a fascinating research topic. Might make a good book if it's well-written.
    ATC is a little different because of the need to visualize aircraft in three dimensions. It's more than just handling information. Public safety communicators have to do a limited amount of visualization, but it's in two dimensions and it mostly has to do with proximity to call locations. I can't speak to this personally, but I have read that women don't do as well at spatial orientation as men, where they do beat men in fine motor control under stress. There are certainly going to be extremes on both sides - this is a generalization. The article I was reading was discussing the introduction of women into the ranks of fighter pilots. On the whole, the women weren't as good at dogfighting, which requires a high degree of spatial orientation, but they were better than the men at precision flying, which had more to do with fine motor control. Don't ask me the name of the article - I'm doing well just to remember this much.

    Leave a comment:


  • willowdared
    replied
    Originally posted by JPatrick
    I'm thinking that there's a cultural component to the large female skew in police dispatching.
    I think you're on to something.

    There are a lot of places where dispatchers make minimum wage.

    Leave a comment:


  • JPatrick
    replied
    Hmmm.... and my experience with air traffic control (purely anecdotal, mind you) is that the stress level can be similar with a lot of rather similar activities. Yet, there are, I'd say at least half males in ATC. To me, this would seem to call into question the premise that "women handle it better".

    I'm thinking that there's a cultural component to the large female skew in police dispatching.

    This would be a fascinating research topic. Might make a good book if it's well-written.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim Dees
    replied
    My former employer has been recruiting for Public Safety Communications Operators (or whatever they're calling it now) for at least 30 years without a break. Obviously, their attrition rate is substantial. For the first ten years or so that I worked there, only one male made it to fully-qualified (radio/phones/all services) status, and he then left to become a police officer (and got fired about four years later). A few other men lasted long enough to get off probation, but none ever got fully qualified to work the radio.

    I don't want to sound sexist, but there is definitely a different vibe in an all-woman work environment, and the women were the first ones to tell me that. The nature of the stress in dispatch is something that women seem to handle better than men. It benefits both sides to understand one another's jobs as thoroughly as possible. My first job in LE was as a part-time dispatcher for the university police department, but comparing that to the job that the people in the comm center of my old department did is like building a toy house of Legos vs. building a real house. On a very busy night, I might have had five people on the single radio channel I used. One of our dispatchers might have 20 or 30 officers on each of two primary channels, one operator to a channel. If a channel closed for a tactical incident, everyone not involved in it would move to the other channel. I really don't know how they did it sometimes, but I do know that they saved my sorry butt more than once.

    Leave a comment:


  • Operator13
    replied
    I guess we're in the minority here.

    22 Radio Operators - ZERO females.

    I've been inside almost 5 years and in that time we've had a total of 3 females but they all "bid-out" into different postions.

    We've also had a couple train but not pass.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fuzz
    replied
    Originally posted by Mole177
    are the benefits and retirement similiar between LEO and dispatcher?

    Our police officers pay is $5026 to $6109 per month. 3% @ 50 retirement. Full medical covered no cost to officer

    Our dispatchers pay is $3892 to $4731 per month. Not sure on retirement but it is less than officer retirement. Decent medical, but I dont think its no cost full coverage

    Leave a comment:


  • nobody33
    replied
    When I was a radio dispatcher> 40 to 2. Both of us males went sworn, so now its 40 to zero. It's a fun job. Lots of drama though. It's like working in a soap opera. Not many males can actually do the job though. Males failed training at a higher rate than females did at both agencies i dispatched for. i don't know why.

    The best dispatchers I have ever worked with where medically retired cops fwiw.
    Last edited by nobody33; 04-04-2007, 04:20 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bushum
    replied
    Originally posted by The Link
    The women that I work with are often grateful when there are a couple of men on their shift. It seems to elevate some of the estrogen induced 'cat fighting'.
    I hope you mean alleviate Unless they are all fighting over you

    Leave a comment:


  • ksadek
    replied
    I can't wait for another opening so I can try to reapply...

    Leave a comment:


  • The Link
    replied
    I am a dispatcher for a So Cal LE agency. The ratio is about 12/1. The women that I work with are often grateful when there are a couple of men on their shift. It seems to alleviate some of the estrogen induced 'cat fighting'. There is a disparity between sworn & non-sworn pay and benifit wise but I knew that going in. I think it is the best job in the world and wouldn't trade it for anything.
    Last edited by The Link; 04-04-2007, 05:57 PM. Reason: poor spelling habits ... as usual

    Leave a comment:


  • exComptonCop
    replied
    Originally posted by Mole177
    Why not become a dispatch?
    If you can deal with all that comes with the job, why not become a dispatcher? Mrs exComptonCop was a police and fire dispatcher for thirteen years, for three different agencies. Her only complaint, was the internal "cat fights" between female dispatchers. But since you're male, this shouldn't be a factor.

    Leave a comment:


  • willowdared
    replied
    Originally posted by Mole177
    are the benefits and retirement similiar between LEO and dispatcher?
    We are represented by different unions, and it would differ based on agency.

    I work for Sheriff's, so I fall under County Government.

    Leave a comment:


  • willowdared
    replied
    We have several male dispatchers, but percentage wise I'd say 1/20th? A few of them see it at a professional, but many see it as a gateway to becoming sworn. We've had several move on to the sworn side.

    We often get deputies sent up to train as call-takers, when they are on
    light-duty status, and once trained, they can work OT. Some retired deputies have come back as per-diem. (Only phones though - not on the radio side)

    I personally would like to see more testosterone....the estrogen can get thick sometimes.
    Last edited by willowdared; 04-04-2007, 12:24 PM.

    Leave a comment:

MR300x250 Tablet

Collapse

What's Going On

Collapse

There are currently 2890 users online. 232 members and 2658 guests.

Most users ever online was 26,947 at 08:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

Welcome Ad

Collapse
Working...
X