Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

'10-4 Codes Over for Virginia Police'

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • '10-4 Codes Over for Virginia Police'

    I saw the article below in the WaPo and thought of you all. It is about Virginia police switching away from 10 codes and moving toward plain English. Our very own Tim Dees is quoted in the article.

    Maybe I am being provocative in saying this, but I am very surprised that the 10 codes are so different from one police department to another. The Federal Government should have mandated uniformity a long while ago. A 10-54 should mean the same thing whether you are Dubuque, Iowa or San Diego, California, or Flint, Michigan.

    One other interesting thing that I learned. Apparently, cops don't want to drop the 10 codes because they think they sound cool saying them. The truth finally comes out.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...111201098.html

  • #2
    I don't know about "sounding cool," but the 10 codes are a lot more expediant than listening to "Plain English." Plus, I don't really care for every Yahoo or Two-bit wannabe that has a scanner knowing what's going on when I'm on a call.
    Extremism in the pursuit of liberty is no vice. Barry Goldwater

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by keith758
      I don't know about "sounding cool," but the 10 codes are a lot more expediant than listening to "Plain English." Plus, I don't really care for every Yahoo or Two-bit wannabe that has a scanner knowing what's going on when I'm on a call.
      10 codes aren't a big secret, almost anyone with a scanner knows it. I think that 10 codes should be the same atleast state wide versus agency to agency. Specially when your pursuit goes into another jurisdiction.

      I do think that 10 code should be replaced by more plain english, but their are times when 10 code is much easier and quicker. 10 code can also be spoken infront of a suspect, and they wont know what your talking about, and can help with Officer safety.
      “Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway” (John Wayne)

      Comment


      • #4
        ten codes are lame and i'm glad they're gone, or at least going. i disagree that they're the be all, end all to brevity and there were always too many to remember when you only use 15-20 of them daily - especially when the $#!+ hit the fan. it never occurred to me that they sounded cool either, because they didn't. why did everything begin with ten anyway??? plain language is the way to go, but don't worry, there's still appropriate officer safety measures taken and limited generation II police phrases for game time.
        The sheep pretend the wolf will never come, but the sheepdog lives for that day.

        Comment


        • #5
          I agree they serve little purpose with officer safety. Everyone in scannerland knows what your saying, and if your dealing with a mope, chances are he's been around LE long enough to figure out the 10 codes as well.

          However, from a communications perspective, 10 codes make for a professional, precise, concise easy to understand language on a local level (because we all know that 10 codes shouldn't be used when dealing with other agencies). Plain speak can lead to wordy lengthier transmissions. I'm not saying that it always does, but it can and often does. There is simply not a need to get rid of 10 codes. They help local communications run smoothly.
          MrJim911

          Someone once told me that time is a predator that stalks us all our lives. But maybe time is also a companion who goes with us on our journey, and reminds us to cherish the moments of our lives because they will never come again

          Comment


          • #6
            I'd rather broadcast "10-79" over the radio at an accident scene than let everyone, including family and friends standing around know what's going on. I don't know a single cop in my department that likes the "Plain English" crap.
            Extremism in the pursuit of liberty is no vice. Barry Goldwater

            Comment


            • #7
              Ten codes have their place. The fire dept where I am employed went to plain english years ago. We had several incidents where the was some major confusion because our ten codes meant one thing but meant something else to another department, and a fire scene is the last place you need confusion like that. So the ten codes were scrapped and the confusion went away. However, comparing FD's and PD's is like comparing apples and oranges. I was on traffic accident where one of the driver's was standing right next to a Trooper and myself and he came back with warrants, (one was for battery on a LEO) it wouldn't have been wise to have that announced in plain english. It was announced with a ten code and he had no idea of what was being said. We managed to take him in with no problems. But it could have been a major problem if he knew what was coming.

              Comment


              • #8
                Im with you guys, I can see problems not using codes, In South Australia we use three digit numbers, 101, (pronounced one oh one) 102. Ive been in hundreads of situations where the codes are usefull. Say at a murder scene where there are at least 10 suspects still there, drunk and they don't know that the other person has died...and you want statments from them before they go off... We were told on the radio that he was 504, or at a rape scene when coms want to know is it a confimed 505 (with the victim in ear shot). We do need a code for warrent though... That would be alot handier than having to chase the crook who finds out the same time you do

                Comment


                • #9
                  I don't buy the brevity argument.

                  We say let's 911B at the location instead of let's meet at the location. Several extra syllables to use the numerical code.

                  How about are you 10-97 yet? instead of are you there yet? Or do you want to Code 7 instead of do you want to eat?

                  At the end of the day we like 'em because we're used to them, but it's hard to justify beyond that.

                  Oh, and I actually agree with Tim Dees. Even though it's not cool to admit it, I think a lot of people like the mystique that it adds... It certainly sounds more impressive to rattle off jargon than to just say what's happening in plain English.
                  Last edited by LA Cop; 11-13-2006, 07:48 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Gotta agree with Tim, and the paralell that the article draws is absolutely right about the mystique. Working in ER and surgery, "We need to take out your gall bladder" is easy to say, and understand vs "You require a laparoscopic cholcystectomy with cholangeograms for cholelithiasis"

                    But that makes the docs feel smart.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ya I think it's ridiculous to get rid of 10 codes, they are a vital part of our job. And like other professions, it's what gives us our own language. These stupid administrators who are requiring this change have probably never worked the street.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Lt32
                        I was on traffic accident where one of the driver's was standing right next to a Trooper and myself and he came back with warrants, (one was for battery on a LEO) it wouldn't have been wise to have that announced in plain english. It was announced with a ten code and he had no idea of what was being said. We managed to take him in with no problems. But it could have been a major problem if he knew what was coming.
                        Exactly.....I have been working the road and not had a ear piece in before.....and have had dispatcher blurt out that a suspect you are running has warrants in plain english instead of 10 code......not a good thing.

                        I would much rather have dispatch ask me if I am 10-6/10-12 (busy/with someone)....because I know that whoever I just ran has warrants....and I can give myself a half second to prepare what I am going to do.... Instead of hearing them blurt out "Be advised suspect has multiple warrants for Assault on a LEO."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ehh, I'm torn, having worked EMS...10-79 is far better for everyone than saying "we need a coroner" or post 9-11 "guys, there's a bomb threat here."
                          Considerably.....

                          83.9 on the Jeff Co. test! Woohoo!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Two Parts:
                            1. Get an earpiece for your handheld or remote radio.
                            2. yes, invent a code, such as the calif. Highway Patrol has
                            "are you 10-6?"
                            (Are you busy...is your suspect there?)
                            There is 10-36 info on your incident ( There is something confidential about your incident) Say "Go Ahead".
                            Dispatcher will give you "warrants and wants" info, OR
                            say" For further, 10-21 dispatch" (Call Dispatch for an over-the-phone explanation of what is not to be made known to the public.)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by xraodcop
                              Two Parts:
                              1. Get an earpiece for your handheld or remote radio.
                              2. yes, invent a code, such as the calif. Highway Patrol has
                              "are you 10-6?"
                              (Are you busy...is your suspect there?)
                              There is 10-36 info on your incident ( There is something confidential about your incident) Say "Go Ahead".
                              Dispatcher will give you "warrants and wants" info, OR
                              say" For further, 10-21 dispatch" (Call Dispatch for an over-the-phone explanation of what is not to be made known to the public.)
                              I agree. We use a similar code (not going to mention it in an open forum) that basically means "we have info that you don't want your subject to hear, let us know when we can give it to you safely." I.E. warrants, suspended, revoked, etc. I would not want to give up use of that code.
                              "The sheep generally do not like the sheepdog. He looks a lot like the wolf. He has fangs and the capacity for violence. The difference, though, is that the sheepdog must not, can not and will not ever harm the sheep." -Lt. Col. Dave Grossman

                              Comment

                              MR300x250 Tablet

                              Collapse

                              What's Going On

                              Collapse

                              There are currently 1928 users online. 158 members and 1770 guests.

                              Most users ever online was 158,966 at 05:57 AM on 01-16-2021.

                              Welcome Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X