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What Is Police Corruption? Part II

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  • What Is Police Corruption? Part II

    OK, so we've seen and experienced police corruption in all shapes, fashions and forms. We've even discussed it amongst each other in the other "Police Corruption" subject.

    So the question now is.... who investigates it in your area?

    Our state police have said they are not in the business of investigating crimes by other police officers. The last time I talked to the head of the state police he said he couldn't investigate any law enforcement agency without a direct order from the Governor of Virginia.

    Do you really want the Fox Police Department investigating a claim that some of their foxes are corrupt and slipping into the Hen House after hours to eat the chickens?

    The FBI obviously has close and necessary ties to police agencies. And they depend on them for a lot of insider information. Are they going to cut off the hand that feeds them? I know one person who asked the FBI for a civil rights investigation, he had a cop stalking him 24 hours a day. The secretary at the FBI office was the wife of the captain at the police agency where the cop worked. Within 24 hours the tables were turned and the complainant was arrested for allegedly stalking the cop. The criminal charge was laughed out of court obviously. The judge knew why the fictitious charge had been placed.

    You can attempt to talk directly to a police chief or sheriff. The only advice you will get it to put it in writing and he will have his men look into it. Six months later they can't even find the written complaint.

    Whether you are a civilian or a fellow officer with unequivocal information on police corruption, who can you really turn to nowadays to have this corruption investigated properly?

  • #2
    boy, I'd love to know the actual answer to that. who do you call when the cops are the problem? for the reasons you state, it's a tough question. and since it's so tough, it usually ends up falling to types y'all love to hate like reporters and defense attorneys
    No kidding. Trying to right this kind of a wrong is lonely, scary and exhausting. "Everybody" thinks it's awful but hardly anyone knows what to do.
    shepherdess extraordinaire

    "Man stands in his own shadow and wonders why it is dark."- Zen proverb

    Comment


    • #3
      A short while back at a FOP picnic we had a candidate for Governor absolutely promise to look into unequivocal information on local police corruption. I honestly think he would have to, it wasn't just a campaign promise IMHO. The only problem was he lost the election.

      (The election results were so close they actually had to do a recount.)

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by fair witness
        boy, I'd love to know the actual answer to that. who do you call when the cops are the problem? for the reasons you state, it's a tough question. and since it's so tough, it usually ends up falling to types y'all love to hate like reporters and defense attorneys
        No kidding. Trying to right this kind of a wrong is lonely, scary and exhausting. "Everybody" thinks it's awful but hardly anyone knows what to do.
        And what exactly do you expect an attorney to do?

        Hire a P.I.? Hope you got the $$, and a good number of them are former cops.

        Get the FBI involved...oh, wait, that was discussed above...

        Talk to the Chief...oh, yeah...they may misplace that file too...

        You may want to consider talking to your State's Attorney General's office (or whoever is your prosecutor's office), or the United State's Attorney's office for that district, because although they are in law enforcement, they are more the administrative/court side than the "beat cop" side.

        Most of them want to be in politics, so being "tough on coruption" looks good for them.

        Can an attorney be helpful? Probably (What, like you think I'm going to say "no, go it on your own!!" )However, realize that anything an attorney can do is almost completely dependant on the access to authorities who investigate coruption.

        If you are talking litigation, then options become a bit more open, but its still the PD that has the files and records that are needed for the most part.

        Comment


        • #5
          Only thing I can say Sheriff is that this is exactly the kind of issue that I have had to deal with in the past (see other post) and quite frankly would like to see something done to address this problem (I don't believe it's rampant, but it sure leaves a sour taste in folks mouths when it happens.)

          I always thought it would be helpful to incorporate more of this very information into the "Ethics Class" part of academy training instead of all of the "this is what you should and shouldn't do" garbage that they teach now (see other post - I believe at this stage, it's probably too late to impart integrity on folks.) The only problem has been Where do you go with the information??

          If you ever figure this one out, please do let me know!!
          Last edited by SRT Sniper; 06-26-2006, 12:46 PM. Reason: because I wanted to...

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          • #6
            thanks Mitchell. in fact, my undying gratitude goes out to EVERYONE willing to discuss this seriously instead of just taking it as "oh blah, more looney tunes scumbag cop-haters."
            IMHO, these problems hurt and endanger honest policepersons as much or more than anyone.
            Last edited by fair witness; 06-26-2006, 12:47 PM.
            shepherdess extraordinaire

            "Man stands in his own shadow and wonders why it is dark."- Zen proverb

            Comment


            • #7
              In my neck of the woods, routine misconduct is investigated by the employing agency, as mandated by state law.

              Issues of significant criminal conduct or corruption are usually investigated by the public integrity unit of the district attorney's office, the state department of justice, or the FBI and US Attorney.

              I can't speak to Sheriff's experiences with the FBI, but I've never seen them cover up any criminal investigations of officers out here. To the contrary, past practice suggests the FBI and US Attorney are definitely not our friends when it comes to such matters.
              Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by L-1
                I can't speak to Sheriff's experiences with the FBI, but I've never seen them cover up any criminal investigations of officers out here. To the contrary, past practice suggests the FBI and US Attorney are definitely not our friends when it comes to such matters.
                I'm sorry, I should have made myself clearer. The FBI (agent) never knew about the requested investigation immediately. The requested investigation was withheld from him. The secretary answering the phone asked the complainant what the call was in reference to, so she would know which agent to give the message to. Once she took the message she immediately got on the phone and called her husband who was the captain of the police agency where the cop being complained about was employed. The captain got his Lt. to immediately place a criminal charge against the complainant so as to thwart any type of FBI investigation of his officer.

                About a week later the FBI agent called the complainant and told him he could not investigate the police officer...... because the complainant was now charged with actually stalking the police officer.

                At the trial the complainant had video of the police officer stalking him on several occasions.... even though it was never needed. When the officer was asked if he had video of the complainant stalking him he said, "Ahh no, I don't!" Even though the police officer had 2 videocams in his patrol car, one in the front windshield and one in the rear windshield, he had NO video whatsoever.

                The judge didn't have to be a rocket scientist to figure out what was going on.

                All of the above raises another corruption question. Who would the complainant ask to investigate the actions of this captain, Lt., and FBI secretary? I think the FBI agent himself (at the time) was pretty much innocent and totally in the dark about what had taken place. The U. S. Attorney General certainly wouldn't want to get involved any more than the State Attorney General would. Who do you turn to?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by L-1
                  To the contrary, past practice suggests the FBI and US Attorney are definitely not our friends when it comes to such matters.
                  Are they in the buisness of making friends, or in the buisness of making sure that the people empowered to enforce the laws are doing it in a proper manner?

                  I would hope they are not in the buisness of being friends, but that they be in the buisness of insuring integrity.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by fair witness
                    ....my undying gratitude goes out to EVERYONE willing to discuss this seriously instead of just taking it as "oh blah, more looney tunes scumbag cop-haters."

                    I agree. It's a learning process for both civilians and police officers.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SHERIFF
                      I'm sorry, I should have made myself clearer. The FBI (agent) never knew about the requested investigation immediately. The requested investigation was withheld from him. The secretary answering the phone asked the complainant what the call was in reference to, so she would know which agent to give the message to. Once she took the message she immediately got on the phone and called her husband who was the captain of the police agency where the cop being complained about was employed. The captain got his Lt. to immediately place a criminal charge against the complainant so as to thwart any type of FBI investigation of his officer.

                      Stop making phone calls yourself.

                      Use Certified Mail return recipt, Fed-Ex or UPS packages that need to be signed for.

                      Not only do you need to document the incidents, you need to find out who is getting the reports, at least who recieved the report at the office.

                      Wouldn't it be a shocker for the FBI agent when he finds out that the complaints were sent for the past 3 weeks, and that the office secratary signed for them...but lo and behold, the reports never made it to his desk, and that his secratary signed for all the packages...

                      If anyone makes the phone calls, this is were the lawyer comes in handy. Phone calls are time. Time is money. Time will be documented and billed, and a letter confirming what was said will be generated and sent to you.
                      Last edited by Mitchell_in_CT; 06-26-2006, 02:12 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I personally believe that there should be an SA division/task force, established in every state to handle these types of issues. If not, or maybe in addition to, there should be a USDOJ division/task force with this very responsibility. Coupled with OPEN communication lines to LEOs only, for them to report criminal activities of other LEOs for investigation.

                        Unlike some of the current SOPs that exist, I also believe that this task/force or whatever you want to call it, should keep ALL information regarding these investigations completely confidential and out of the "view" of any other LEA or LEO until such time as the investigation either ends with no ascertainable criminal activity ocurring or the offending LEO has been charged.

                        Another idea here would be to "plant" an undercover operative within the suspect LEOs LEA in an effort to obtain either direct testimony or evidence to substantiate the allegations for appropriate legal action.

                        Just my .02 worth on this one!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Mitchell_in_CT
                          Stop making phone calls.

                          Use Certified Mail return recipt, Fed-Ex or UPS packages that need to be signed for.

                          Not only do you need to document the incidents, you need to find out who is getting the reports, at least who recieved the report at the office.

                          Wouldn't it be a shocker for the FBI agent when he finds out that the complaints were sent for the past 3 weeks, and that the office secratary signed for them...but lo and behold, the reports never made it to his desk, and that his secratary signed for all the packages...
                          Well, that's one solution. But when dealing with law enforcement officers,
                          who would think beforehand that all of this is necessary?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SHERIFF
                            Well, that's one solution. But when dealing with law enforcement officers,
                            who would think beforehand that all of this is necessary?
                            Um...well...Me...but then again, I make people miserable on a professional basis, not only for personal enjoyment...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I never wanted to make anybody miserable. Just not part of who I am. When I first became aware of the problem I am trying to help resolve, the world suddenly seemed to turn upside down.
                              shepherdess extraordinaire

                              "Man stands in his own shadow and wonders why it is dark."- Zen proverb

                              Comment

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