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More Kali craziness....

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  • More Kali craziness....

    Hide your kids?
    "When you guys get home and face an anti-war protester, look him in the eyes and shake his hand. Then, wink at his girlfriend, because she knows she's dating a *****."
    -Commanding General, 1st Marine Division

  • #2
    Who/what is Kali? Not to seem ignorant. Also, your link is sorta busted, I think that http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,80834,00.html should work a little better [Wink] But I couldn't find the name Kali in the story. I'll probably feel silly when I find out
    I am disrespectful to dirt. Can you see that I am serious? - Mr. Sparkle

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    • #3
      I believe Kali was a refernce to California, forgive me if I'm wrong.

      Comment


      • #4
        California isn't the only one: "Some schools in New York and Oregon are trying to do the same."

        Also, the SF and LA school districts don't necessarily reflect what's going on in the rest of the state.

        Comment


        • #5
          I don't think it's such a bad thing... I don't have a problem with recruiters going to a school and having a booth set up, but they can get pretty obtrusive - lots of telephone calls, junk in the mail, etc... I say let the kids decide what they want, rather than get pressured by a recruiter.
          Concerning the difference between man and the jackass: some observers hold that there isn't any. But this wrongs the jackass.
          -Mark Twain

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          • #6
            I have a grandson in the Navy. He enlisted a couple of years ago and is stationed in Okinawa.

            None of the other grandchildren are old enough, but I would rather they joined the military than hung out with the friendly neighborhood drug pushers or just sat around expecting someone else to support them. It is, however, their choice. If they are contacted they can say no.

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            • #7
              I find it rather ironic that the very same parents, and school administrators, who support giving high school children the opportunity to make adult choices, are the same ones who don't trust their kids to "Just Say No" when it comes to military recruiters

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              • #8
                Sig220Man,

                Couldn't agree more, SF and LA, are two of the most PITA cities in existence! Sometimes I think the lawmakers and administrators there do stuff purposely to circumvent the laws as an attention getting tactic ! Heck, I guess they can't lure anyone to those places any other way! They give new meaning to deperate times call for desperate measures!

                In my part of Cali, that wouldn't happen (or hasn't yet)! Pretty conservative here, though!

                Gracie
                "Life breaks us all and afterwards some are strong at the broken places."
                --Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms

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                • #9
                  So what's wrong with informing parents of their rights???
                  Bill R

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                  • #10
                    If someone has a legal right to do something and no one tells them, isn't that similar to depriving them of their rights? Or are they supposed to hire a lawyer to find a loophole?

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                    • #11
                      Ah, that Kali. I should listen to more rap [Wink]

                      I understand the pressures military recruiters are under. They are often yanked from other positions and career paths and given minimal training and sometimes unrealistic goals, and their success or failure reflects on them the same way success or failure in combat would. I don't think it's a fair way to do it.

                      Having said that, these pressures lead them to be pretty sleezy sometimes. Here is an example from one of my very good buddies- his last year in high school, he was a peer counselor, which gave him access to all of the student records in school, as in, addresses and phone numbers. He signed up for the Marine Reserve's delayed entry program at the beginning of the year, and over the course of that year, slipped his recruiter the name and phone number of every senior at our high school. This was of course against school policy- if the military has access to that info, an actual school employee would deliver it to them.

                      Regardless of whether or not the recruiters had some other access to that info, it was pretty scummy. He made Lance Corporal almost the second he was done with Recruit Training, a promotion which had been promised to him because of the names and phone numbers he'd turned over.

                      So I can see why parents would opt to not give them the info. I love and respect the military in this country. That same friend is at Buckley Air Force Base right now waiting to get shipped out (now a full Corporal) and I fully support him and the other friends I have in the military. But the recruiting end makes used car salesmen look respectable (I should know, I was a car salesman briefly ). They lie to and pressure young men and women regularly. If I were a parent, I wouldn't want a recruiter cold-calling my kid, even though I would completely support a military career for a child.

                      I don't think it's unreasonable that parents should be able to keep the military from getting their number like any other telemarketer.
                      I am disrespectful to dirt. Can you see that I am serious? - Mr. Sparkle

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                      • #12
                        Actually,

                        I should clarify my post...I am not necessarily referring to this particular incident, but the many other crazy incidents that occur in these two cities everyday!

                        Hope it helps!

                        Gracie
                        "Life breaks us all and afterwards some are strong at the broken places."
                        --Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms

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                        • #13
                          I kind of feel like it's a bad law that requires the schools to give out the childs information in the first place. I have no problem with them setting up places in the school where any interested kid could grab some literature or ask some questions, but there should never be a requirement on the school to give out private information.
                          I spent 9 years in the military and I know that recruiters have all sorts of ways of getting in touch with potential recruits. There really shouldn't have to be a law that helps them out.

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                          • #14
                            quote:
                            Originally posted by Bill R:
                            So what's wrong with informing parents of their rights???

                            There's a big difference between informing parents of their rights, and going out of their way to make sure that the parents DON'T allow military recruiters to have their children's information.

                            The link to the article doesn't seem to work anymore, but I remember it saying that despite tight budgets, the two school districts involved are spending a LOT of money to make sure every single parent knows he/she has the right to deny access to their children by recruiters. Plus the article implied that it's ONLY the LA and SF school districts (the two most liberal in the state) that are doing this, and not every school district in CA.

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                            • #15
                              From the Story:
                              quote:
                              Despite tight education budgets, San Francisco and Los Angeles are spending thousands on letters to students and parents,
                              LA Unified has over 736,000 students. If they sent a letter home for each student costing 1 penny the total cost would be $7,360. That's thousands sure enough. I am certainly not a fan of LA or SF but stating that they had spent thousands is not really saying much. Granted, money is tight but that really is chump change for districts of that size. I didn't see in the article that the districts had done anything other than send home a letter informing parents of their right to opt out. Obviously the district would not be sending letters to all grades but even if it were only the top two grades, it's still pennies a student.

                              [ 03-13-2003, 08:38 PM: Message edited by: Bill R ]
                              Bill R

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