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How can this be defended?

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  • Chaplain Keppy
    replied
    I have no sympathy for her.

    I'm sure she didn't wake up and say, "I think I'll kill someone today," but since we know drug use effects reflexes, memory, etc., you can't call it an "accident" when she hit him after taking drugs and getting behind the wheel of a car.

    Hit and run leaving him in the street would have been bad enough-- he might or might not be found in time to be helped. But she effectively HID him in the garage, which guaranteed that he couldn't be helped.

    That, to me, is murder.

    Leave a comment:


  • RebeccaCDT
    replied
    If they wanted to push the death penalty, they could have looped it. While the Hit and run part of the accident was an accident, removing him from the scene (ala wedged in the windsheild) and detaining him against his will in the garage while he died...sounds like a case of kidnapping/homicide. They could have pushed special circumstances.

    Personally, I think the only "sorry" she felt the whole time she was crying was for herself.

    Leave a comment:


  • auntysuz63
    replied
    Question for you Mike: Did you ask the juror who you knew what took them so long to come to a verdict? Less than an hour? Five minutes would have been long enough...vote and come back.

    [ 06-29-2003, 05:53 PM: Message edited by: auntysuz63 ]

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I read somewhere that she was in the health care business. That's a frightening thought. I hope there aren't any more in that line of work that are alcoholics, on drugs and exercising that kind of judgment.

    Driving in her condition was stupid enough, but the most sickening part was that she kept running to the garage to apologize but did nothing to help him. She was just waiting for him to die so she could dump the body after it was too late for someone else to find him and help.

    If I had been on the jury I would have felt no sympathy for her, even though I am from California.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Tx
    replied
    Well I know one of the jurors, and that person said that it was split between giving her life and 50 years, so they got the best deal they could. She'll probably be eligible for parole on 25 years though.

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  • GRACE
    replied
    Auntysuz,

    To answer your question...it can't!

    She is scum and she is lucky 50 years is all she got...

    Take care

    Leave a comment:


  • 156
    replied
    Auntysuz63, I totally agree with you. If she's a good person, I'd hate to run across a bad one!

    Leave a comment:


  • SGT Dave
    replied
    I have also been sickened by it. I KNOW that many attorneys say they are just giving the client 110% and assuring a "fair" trial.

    This guy is lower than whale feces, and ANYONE who would defend her to the point of aggresively fighting the charge, OR defend him for soiling the hallowed halls of justice with that crap story should be **** (didn't want to openly suggest a felony. )

    I KINDA see his argument attacking the elements of the crime, in that there was no premeditation and this was a FAILURE to act, and not an act, but that is the only (ONLY) thing that he said that made him RESEMBLE a decent member of society.

    Leave a comment:


  • GRACE
    replied
    GlockA,

    Re-read your post, I now understand what you meant so I edited my comment!

    Take care

    [ 06-29-2003, 02:28 PM: Message edited by: GRACE ]

    Leave a comment:


  • Glockarmorer
    replied
    He also tried to justify her inaction by saying she wasn't thinking clearly because she was under the influence of drugs and alcohol! That crap may fly with a CA jury, but not in TX!

    Leave a comment:


  • auntysuz63
    started a topic How can this be defended?

    How can this be defended?

    CNN Homepage This woman's defense attorney actually had the gall to say that she was a good person with community support. Did he really, really expect any jury to believe that a good person would leave a man to die, impaled on the windshield of her car? Did he really think the jury wouldn't be horrified by what they saw? Did he really think the jury would believe that she was a "good" person? What was it exactly that made her a good person? People who are basically good, don't drive under the influence of alcohol and drugs, run over pedestrians, and leave them to die in their garage. This case infuriates me. Her attorney should have had her plead guilty and there should never have been a trial. I cannot believe that an offer was not put on the table; her attorney just didn't accept it. This woman deserves everything she got...plus some.

    Okay, I'm through ranting now.

    [ 06-29-2003, 02:36 AM: Message edited by: auntysuz63 ]

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