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  • bailbonds and bail enfrocement

    Just a note , some police officers dont like the bail bond agents that have the cowboy mentality, i myself being a retired police officer .tried it awhile!
    most people dont know that a bail bondsman has more arrest power than a sheriff.the reason when a bondsman has a certified copy of the bond a F.T.A. warrant and a fi fey from the court they dont need extradition. as the fugitive is a ward of the court being out on bail. now i agree that some are bad apples but they do serve a purpose but a good bondsman allways involves the police on a apprehension!

  • #2
    Thats news to me...they have more arrest powers...hum....
    "An excuse is worse and more terrible than a lie, for an excuse is a lie guarded."

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    • #3
      Most of us don't like bailbondsmen because they tend to be reckless, have little regard for common sense or professionalism, and tend to be very poorly trained and overly aggressive.

      I, as a citizen, find it frightening that a bailbondsman can enter my house, by force, without a search warrant, if they simply believe that a fugitive is inside. For less than the burden of proof that I need to initiate a traffic stop, they can kick in my door. There's a problem there.

      Does anybody recall when a group of bailbondsmen, dressed in black SWAT-style gear, kicked in the door of the wrong house several years back? The owner of the residence, believing that the bailbondsmen were home invaders, attempted to defend himself and was shot and killed. Turns out that the arrest warrant had the wrong address on it.
      "He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you."
      -Friedrich Nietzsche

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      • #4
        Fortunately for me, Illinois does not have bounty hunters; we have Illinois Bail Rule, which means if you are arrested, you post 10% of the face amount. They trust you for the rest, and if you don't show a warrant is usually issued.

        I have read some horror stories about bail enforcement agents, and even though I try to keep an open mind, I am leary of them.
        “Truth is not what you want it to be; it is what it is, and you must bend to its power or live a lie.”

        Miyamoto Musashi

        “Life Is Hard, But It's Harder When You're Stupid”

        George V. Higgins (from The Friends of Eddie Coyle)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by irishlad2nv
          Thats news to me...they have more arrest powers...hum....
          Uh yeeeeaaaaah, gonna have to back up Irish on that broadly generalized statement. Things have changed ALOT since folks were killed and the wrong people transported to jail across state lines in the last few years, and after too many third parties had their doors kicked in only to find they didn't even know the fugitive. Still happens of course. There are strict rules in nearly every state that actually allows them, but the regulation is spotty at best. I think law enforcment in general keeps a wary and distrustful eye upon them. It's a real snake and mongoose dance we do...

          California (naturally) has a bizillion requirements, yet the industry still attracts a VERY shady type of person, and horror stories are abundant; and it ain't that difficult to qualify if you don't beat your old lady or lack personal friends who knew you in prison.

          Side note: Lotsa methamphetamine and cocaine use among Dog the Bounty Hunter types (including Dog himself at one time, he admits it, I'm not judging), obviously not bound by pesky departmental P&Ps or state regulations. Those stakeouts can get pretty long I guess! There are no drug tests for the profession, unless the insurance requires it initially. It is a very shady business.

          The only powers of arrest these guys have is that of a private person, period (thank gawd). The rest is all in their heads how they rationalize catching the fugitive, so they can get paid. They are as limited as anyone else to enter a private residence/property without warrant or exigent circumstances, substantially less justified than law enforcement in doing so for any reason including "arresting" the fugitive. The only power they have is through their relationship with law enforcement, and use of force. The spotty licensing is meant to try and screen them, and keep an eye on them (bwaaaaaaahahahahaha!!!)

          The only positive is that the system is broken, and they bring in people that law enforcement/the court is unable or unwilling to because of resources and budgets at this frayed point in time.
          In Vino Veritas

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          • #6
            i dont trust bail bondsmen. never have and dont plan on doing so anytime soon. i have ran into several in the past year around here. they are as crooked as the thugs i drag into jail. I have arrested a couple of them in the past year for domestic violence and fraud, no surprise. half of them are related to the scum i arrest. its all about the money to them. prove me wrong.
            "Its not cheating, unless you get caught."-Al Bundy

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            • #7
              I have run onto one here in this town who is on the up and up. He has called in several wanted persons for which he has no interest - just to help. And he has contacts with several detectives in my agency.

              Don't completely trust him in terms of law issues (ie, Const issues) and do believe he could jam up a rookie cop, but like I said, he seems decent and hard working.

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              • #8
                Some are OK, but most are untrustworthy. Some even take the money and run so to speak (a "client" posts bond with the agent, the agent never files it). It is a very shady business. You sleep in bed with the devil, occasionally you're gonna have to f**k...
                In Vino Veritas

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                • #9
                  I don't rely on him. Just think that he sometimes is a good source of info and think that he is mostly on the up and up. I treat anything that he says as if it were an anoymous call. No doors kicked in, no rights violated, don't let him come with.

                  I would say he probably doesn't fit the typical sterotype. Wife, kids, decent house, knows to stay away when police are taking care of business.

                  That said, still take it with a grain of salt.

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                  • #10
                    There a few decent folks, don't get me wrong. Information is information, as long as you think it's realiable.

                    Here's a great breakdown of Bounty Hunter Laws, including the states that ban them:

                    http://www.americanbailcoalition.com...ter%20Laws.htm

                    Many states prohibit forcible entry of a residence for any reason except those that a private person would have under specific circumstances (felony in presence, great bodily injury or harm, etc.). Others prohibit it for a third party. Count on all moving towards banning forcible entry, if it hasn't happened already, gotta confirm this because the site information is likely dated. Rest assured we are moving towards bounty hunter restrictions increasing in the United States (if not outright banned as already indicated in some states), and have been moving in that direction for some time...

                    Bounters Hunters are not exempt from anything, and this has been decided long ago in the courts RE: using private persons as sub rosa or ex officio agents to conduct illegal search and seizures (they're private citizens! they can do whatever they want!). Any activities being conducted by fugitive recovery agents that appear to be exempt from warrant or other restrictions upon law enforcement have simply not caught up with them yet, criminally and civilly.
                    In Vino Veritas

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                    • #11
                      Sorry about the typos: REALIABLE, and BOUNTERS HUNTERS??? Unsat, I know...
                      In Vino Veritas

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                      • #12
                        the good ole days, when the bondsman at xmas time would ask ya
                        what flavor room-a-tism medicine ya liked, and a few days later would deliver
                        yr medicine out of the trunk of his car, never mind the coffee and donuts he'd bring to the booking area....lol....
                        " if you talk in your sleep, don't mention my name....
                        " if you walk in your sleep, forget where you came....

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                        • #13
                          Yep, that roomy-tizm medicine sure is good fer mah soul. Don't need ta wait 'til X-mas time though!

                          I was born into the wrong era. Things have not changed for the better it seems, except for the criminals. It's big business for bondsman, no doubt there, but large corporations have begun monopolizing the industry, and things have gotten sloppier despite increased regulation. Curious to see what happens next...
                          In Vino Veritas

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                          • #14
                            Someone in a nearby agency to mine just arrested a Bounty Hunter for impersonating an officer...

                            I have mixed reviews of them... I personally dont care if they tread on the rights of someone who is wanted, no skin off my back... But then again when you give that kind of authority to some of these idiots bad things can happen...
                            Retired 02/01/13

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by bigcop97
                              Someone in a nearby agency to mine just arrested a Bounty Hunter for impersonating an officer...

                              I have mixed reviews of them... I personally dont care if they tread on the rights of someone who is wanted, no skin off my back... But then again when you give that kind of authority to some of these idiots bad things can happen...
                              Happens alot here in Cali. Very specific rules about attire and badges, which are naturally broken all the time. I also do not necessarily care about the rights of our clientele (unless it jeopardizes the case), but become concerned when they get it wrong so frequently, and innocents get caught in the middle. POST / Peace Officer training standards do make a difference, and there are too many jackasses out there thinking they are law enforcement (Dog the Bounty Hunter included).

                              They are the exponential version of the nightmare mall security guard (*Skateboarders in the food court, deadly force is authorized*). Too bad the system is so broken that we need these guys to do the job we should be doing ourselves.
                              In Vino Veritas

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