Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Computers????

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • foxtrot
    replied


    [ 12-22-2002, 02:56 AM: Message edited by: foxtrot ]

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob A
    replied
    Good point. The problem nobody ever seemed to be able to solve for me with my custom PC was a bad power supply. I tried to turn it on one day and it took a few minutes. I got a multimeter and checked power output and just as a voltage reading dropped, it crashed. Poof! $25 later my problem was solved. Only other problem since was a bad hard drive, which had written Win95 to bad sectors and wouldn't load. I just took one from another machine and copied files to it from DOS.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lictalon
    replied
    You know...sudden thought.

    What do you mean "fried?"

    If it's a single piece, it may be much easier to just replace that single part...especially if the computer is not so old it's out of date.

    Much cheaper than anything suggested so far...

    Leave a comment:


  • SGT Dave
    replied
    HP SUX!

    I DO have one, but that's because it was one of the cheap package deals from Wal-Mart.

    I have had TWO printers from them that go out in about a year, and they will NOT talk to you at HP customer service without a credit card number and $25 fee!!!!!!

    That is SO much BS-BOTH of the freakin' printers went out the same way-and they would not talk to me. I'm not talking Tech Supprt-I'm talking even their sorry CS department.

    THAT IS SOOOOOOO SORRY!

    I KNOW-some of you probably love HP, and everone gets a lemon once in a while, but I had TWO lemon printers in order, and the company DOES NOT STAND BEHIND THEM.

    My wife worked in CS, and they answered calls from people that hadn't even BOUGHT their product-just "looking" at it or comparing.

    I often speak with CS reps about products I'm considering, but with HP, they won't even talk to you after buying a computer and TWO printers, if they're out of warranty!

    PLEASE tell all your friends about this sorry company-and that they are connected to Al-Quada or something!

    HP is sorry!

    BTW-I bought a Lexmark printer that has lasted TWICE as long as the HPs did, and is giving NO problems.

    I just bought the wifey an IBM laptop for Christmas, but I can't say anything about it yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • PelicanDriver
    replied
    I built my current computer with the help of a geek at work. (Geek being a term of respect and endearment.) I got exactly what I wanted and saved some money. But, I recommend this only IF you like doing that sort of thing and have somebody handy to help you out.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sig220Man
    replied
    quote:
    Originally posted by Bob A:
    You can buy a Dell computer for $700, so let me know where the free computers are, I'd like to get one for my wife. I got a top of the line, custom made computer, with everything I wanted in it, and it was only about $100 more than the components I priced separately at shows.

    There are lots of options this way, and lots of opportunity to have configuration errors. Unless you just want to take up a hobby building PCs, I'd leave this to pros.

    I agree Bob. I just did a bit of online checking at one of my favorite computer stores (and no it's not Best Buy), and to build the same Dell that I just took delivery on, this is what it would cost me:

    Motherboard (Intel Tualatin) $75
    Processor (Pentium 4 2.4 GHz) $275
    Memory (128 MB PC 2700 333 MHz) $50
    Hard drive (60 GB Ultra DMA 133) $115
    CD-R/W drive (40x/12x/40x) $100
    Video card (nVidia GeForce MX 64 MB) $125
    Audio card (Basic) $20
    Case $100
    Power Supply (400 watt) $80
    Case Fan $15
    CPU Fan $25
    Operating System (Windows XP Home -- Full Install) $200

    Grand total: a whopping $1180 [Eek!]

    Compare that to my Dell, which on their refurbished website only cost me $590, including shipping; with all the upgrades I added to it (add'l warranty, add'l RAM, DVD burner), it still cost slightly less than the custom-built example above. A BRAND NEW one would only run $928. Both include a one year warranty, 24/7 tech support, additional software and hardware (speakers, modem, network card, etc). There's also a much better chance that the system will work the first time it's turned on. While Dell's customer support has gone downhill, it's still better than the customer support you'll get by building your own, which is ZERO.

    [ 12-21-2002, 06:13 AM: Message edited by: Sig220Man ]

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob A
    replied
    I estimate you'll spend $500-$700 total going this route.

    You can buy a Dell computer for $700, so let me know where the free computers are, I'd like to get one for my wife. I got a top of the line, custom made computer, with everything I wanted in it, and it was only about $100 more than the components I priced separately at shows.

    There are lots of options this way, and lots of opportunity to have configuration errors. Unless you just want to take up a hobby building PCs, I'd leave this to pros.

    If you buy a Gateway or Dell or HP know this:
    These companies tack on from $200-$1000 dollars for hardware and software you will never use.


    True (of software anyway) of any computer you buy in a retail store, not something unique to Dell or Gateway. Unless you or a custom shop build it, this is how it is. The mfgs make up for the profit lost on each PC by adding AOL and things for a certain fee per unit. There is no hardware on any of my computers that I don't use, at least that I'm aware of.

    So far I've had an IBM, a Compaq, a custom made PC from a computer shop, an EMachines, and a custom Dell. The EMachines was $400 at Circuit City. Good computer, but proprietary, and nowhere to add components like a DVD drive internally, and parallel connections are s-l-o-w. The custom job I had was plagued with configuration problems that the shop never even tried to fix from the first month or so I had it.

    If you shop around you can find great buys. I agree that Best Buy will nail you if they can.

    [ 12-21-2002, 02:30 AM: Message edited by: Bob A ]

    Leave a comment:


  • Sig220Man
    replied
    quote:
    Originally posted by MadMax:
    One of my co-workers got a Mac G4 (or something like that) on Tuesday. $3800.00, he got it for $3000.00. He claims it is the best on the market. Apparently it will operate w/both MAC and PC sytems.

    Macs, especially newer ones, can run PC programs in one of three ways:

    1. Opening the file in an equivalent Mac program. For example, most of Microsoft Office has an equivalent Mac version, so if a co-worker gives you a Word or Excel or PowerPoint file, you can view it on a Mac as long as you have the appropriate software.

    2. Use of emulation software such as Virtual PC by Connectix. VERY SLOW, even on a fast Mac such as the G3 and G4 series. Don't even think of trying to run a game on it.

    3. Use of a PCI card with an entire PC chipset built in. These have a miniaturized version of a PC crammed into one of those cards, including a processor such as those from Intel or AMD. Just as fast as a real PC, but for the price of one of these cards you might as well buy a real PC.

    Leave a comment:


  • CinaC
    replied
    quote:
    company without morals
    Isn't that an oxymoron? Yeah, I hate Best Buy, especially at this time of year. They'll have four registers open, lines all the way back to the TV section, and the six dudes standing around yapping with each other aren't bright enough to think, "hey, maybe I should open my register" until the managers come out and start screaming at them.

    Leave a comment:


  • SpecOpsWarrior
    replied
    I bought an Acer from Best Buy in '98, and an extended warranty to go with it. After eight in home repairs in three years, and threats of a law suit for failing to live up to the terms of the warranty, Best Buy finally agreed to replace it!

    I got an in-store credit for it and was allowed to pick out anything within the price range of my credit. I found a Compaq Presario and took it home, haven't had a single problem since, except for some Windows ME problems.

    One thing I can recommend, stay as far away from Best Buy as you can, they are a company without morals, all they care about is getting your money, after that, all they wanna do is screw you. The customer service isn't worth crap, and what really burned me up more then anything else, was the repeated lying! It will be a cold day in hell before I ever spend another cent in a Best Buy store!

    Leave a comment:


  • n567
    replied
    If you want good customer support, and a well built computer that'll last, I can only suggest finding a local company that's got a good reputation.

    They use quality parts, put them together themselves, and tech support is only a 10 minute drive away! (though usually they're so small there is no automated tech support or any of that crap).

    Leave a comment:


  • MadMax
    replied
    I use an ACER. It was custom built in 98. have had no major problems.

    One of my co-workers got a Mac G4 (or something like that) on Tuesday. $3800.00, he got it for $3000.00. He claims it is the best on the market. Apparently it will operate w/both MAC and PC sytems.

    Leave a comment:


  • Delta_V
    replied
    I've had nothing but good luck with Dell as well. I'm on my second one now.

    Compaq is who I'd stay away from, the laptop that I had of theirs was terrible about crashing, breaking, and being extremely slow.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hemtt
    replied
    Generally the more depraved a Game is the faster I buy it. I don't have the internet at home so I have to get all my porn and violence on my X-Box.

    Leave a comment:


  • PC Instructor
    replied
    I recommend signing up for an Adult school or community college class on building a computer.

    You can pick your own parts, and the instructor will help you choose what you want and/or dont want in your computer. You can save HUNDREDS this way.

    Then you'll put it all together under the supervision of the instructor, and then learn how to load the operating system of your choice.

    These classes are usually 2-3 weeks, 1-2 days per week. Truly a rewarding experience.

    I estimate you'll spend $500-$700 total going this route.
    ----------
    If you buy a Gateway or Dell or HP know this:
    These companies tack on from $200-$1000 dollars for hardware and software you will never use.

    Just think, for a small time investment you can build a computer that compares to these for a fraction of the expense.

    Leave a comment:

MR300x250 Tablet

Collapse

What's Going On

Collapse

There are currently 2907 users online. 157 members and 2750 guests.

Most users ever online was 158,966 at 04:57 AM on 01-16-2021.

Welcome Ad

Collapse
Working...
X