Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Taser Death and Policy by Email

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Taser Death and Policy by Email

    Recently, two Metro Nashville police officers shot a disorderly 21 year old up to 19 times with department issue tasers. The defendant had been bounced twice from a club, was acting bizarre, and then stripped and ran around naked until police arrived. The defendant was shocked multiple times while officers tried to subdue him and died later. The defendant was reportedly using LSD at the time of the incident.

    In the article, the reporters question why the manufacturer
    Last edited by slamdunk; 09-29-2005, 06:19 AM. Reason: spelling
    The Blog: Slam Dunks

  • #2
    How would you have handled this incident?

    What viable option did these officers have? Should they have let the suspect run off and continue to threaten the community? No weapon is used completely without risk. Baton can kill (and there are times when that is reasonable). I remember when Mace and OC received the same hype. No drugs-no disorderly behavior. No disorderly behavior-no police. No police-No Taser. No Taser-no newspaper story. The suspect is responsible for this incident. I wonder how man officers have been injured or killed because they used a Taser when they would have been justified using deadly force. I don
    Last edited by Tennsix; 09-29-2005, 07:35 AM. Reason: spelling

    Comment


    • #3
      Policy usually cannot keep up with manufacturers advisories. When new equipment is adopted for use by an agency, it is usually covered by a general policy. A generic policy would call TASER an "electrical muscular disruption device" rather than a TASER. When the officers are certified, they are almost always advised that bulletins might be issued from time to time that officers should consider.

      Administrators will always cya by saying a memo was forwarded but not read. Fortunately, a bulletin isn't policy or binding. The department will probably be found negligent for not offering remedial training addressing TASER concerns, but the officers actions will be judged by the totality of the circumstances. At least in a perfect world it would happen that way.
      Jerry
      "If all else fails, stop using all else!"

      Comment


      • #4
        I reread my original post and fail to see where I was being critical of the responding officers. I simply was offering background provided by the media and the press release written by the involved department for folks who were not familiar with incident.

        My reason for posting this was to get feedback on a department holding officers accountable for a forwarded email. I see many problems with this practice.

        Certainly, my CYA comment is an educated guess as I believe are most posts on boards. If you are looking to read 100% fact with no opinion, then you are at the wrong URL.

        Glad I could be a punch pillow for your rant Tennsix and I hope you can now have a productive day. --Scott
        The Blog: Slam Dunks

        Comment


        • #5
          I stand by my post.

          The fundamental argument (of your post) was to find fault with the police. The two initial officers will be tossed in the mix, if the PD is determined to be liable or otherwise in error.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Tennsix
            The fundamental argument (of your post) was to find fault with the police.
            Hmmm... I am guessing that while you were pursuing an advanced degree your extracurricular activities did not include the debate team. --Scott
            The Blog: Slam Dunks

            Comment


            • #7
              I do not have an advanced degree and I was not on the debate team; kudos to you for those earth shaking revelations. Why don

              Comment


              • #8
                I don't think I have psychic powers.

                My comments were directed in response to your inaccurate summary of my original post. --Scott
                The Blog: Slam Dunks

                Comment


                • #9
                  O.K., enough. You should continue this in private maybe.
                  Jerry
                  "If all else fails, stop using all else!"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Ok...to get back on topic if it's not written as a general order in the written policy manuel it doesn't exist.
                    The nine most terrifying words in the English language are, "I'm from the government and I'm here to help."
                    Ronald Reagan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      What viable option did these officers have? Should they have let the suspect run off and continue to threaten the community?
                      Of course not; they should have beat him until he was unable to breathe with a baton and then OC him to make sure he couldn't see. That would assuredly render him non-combatant.
                      No weapon is used completely without risk. Baton can kill (and there are times when that is reasonable). I remember when Mace and OC received the same hype.
                      The risks are being weighed. There may be a significant risk of death when the taser is used against a person who is under the influence of drugs and acting irrationally. If that is the case there NEEDS to be policy changes involving taser use.
                      No drugs-no disorderly behavior. No disorderly behavior-no police. No police-No Taser. No Taser-no newspaper story. The suspect is responsible for this incident.
                      How is this relevant? We are concerned about the officer's conduct in deploying the taser, not whether the suspect deserved to be arrested.
                      I wonder how man officers have been injured or killed because they used a Taser when they would have been justified using deadly force. I don
                      -I don't feel you honor someone by creating a physical gesture (the salute). You honor them by holding them in memory and, in law enforcement, proceeding in vigilant, ethical police work. You honor this country or deceased soldiers or whatever you're honoring when you salute a flag by thinking, feeling, and continuing a life of freedom.

                      --ArkansasRed24

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        How much force is too much? We speak after the fact and can say, that was excessive, however, during the arrest, the officers generally feel compelled to gain compliance before de escalating their force. Do we know the resistance level of the subject? Do we know what the next logical step should be if the TASER was not effective in controlling this individual? Agencies that currently use TASERs have been advised to recognize signs of excited delirium, but they must first secure the subject before he can be treated for what is known to be a medical emergency. The lethal levels of drugs in the suspects system is found after the fact. Don't forget, medics and hospital personnel are not the ones called to the scene until the subject is under control. That is never mentioned by the media.
                        Jerry
                        "If all else fails, stop using all else!"

                        Comment

                        MR300x250 Tablet

                        Collapse

                        What's Going On

                        Collapse

                        There are currently 6360 users online. 334 members and 6026 guests.

                        Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                        Welcome Ad

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X