Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Your First Time?

Collapse

300x250 Mobile

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Your First Time?

    I saw my first suicide today. Girl in the dorms hung herself.

    Is it normal to feel this numb?
    "The world isn't as it should be. It's harsh. And it's cruel. That's why there's us. Champions. We live as if the world were as it should be, to show it what it can be."-Angel Season 4

  • #2
    Every one is different and acts/reacts according to they're nature. What is normal for you IS how you react. Not what anyone else thinks. As old as the statement is....time is very helpful....
    "We have enough youth, how about a fountain of smart?"

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Grizzly
      Every one is different and acts/reacts according to they're nature. What is normal for you IS how you react. Not what anyone else thinks. As old as the statement is....time is very helpful....
      Exactly, no two people are the same. Me? Having been in Iraq I could see a deceased person and honestly it affects me little if at all. In a way, that is sad that I am numbed to it, but that is just me. Fact is there are just some people who can take it in stride and others who it does affect. Neither are right or wrong, it is just their personality. Only thing you can do is take it as a fact of life and keep steppin' on through your day.
      sigpic

      Comment


      • #4
        Everyone remembers their "first". The important thing is to also remember your loved ones. I imagine them when I've had a bad day and it makes me feel better.
        But by the grace of God, I am what I am.
        1 Corinthians 15:10

        Comment


        • #5
          Your first time

          Death, in it's many forms is something a police officer sees on a regular basis. A lot of death scenes are pretty grisly, and quite a few will remain with you for the rest of your life. Don't feel too badly about being a little numbed or queasy. The important thing is to do your job, gather facts, protect the scene,and in general , function as a police officer.

          Comment


          • #6
            LIke everyone has said, It's just how YOU respond. As a SF you may or may not see much more death in a LEO capacity. As a civy LEO unfortunately you will see more than you need. Just remember that if it is bugging you, vent it. Vent it over a beer with your buddies, or to a base Doc, or here if you need to.

            Sorry to say if you stay in the LE business, there will be more.

            Comment


            • #7
              I agree if it bothers you talk it out with co-workers or your friends. I prefer friends that are co-workers. civilians sometimes don't understand. In our
              area we have a Crictical Incident Stress Debreifing Team respond if the scene
              was very traumatic. The team is made up of veteran officers and medical personnel. Everyone involved in the incident gets together and talks it out.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm not a leo yet, but i saw my neighbor after he shot himself. He had terminal cancer and was withering away. It helped me to talk about it in due time. Still can picture it in my mind
                si vis pacem para bellum

                Comment


                • #9
                  I would suggest, Dante, that, in addition to your seeking advice and opinions on this forum, you also sit down with any professional and/or volunteer peer counsellor(s) that your Agency has available. Talking face-to-face with someone trained to do this type of work is a good thing and should NOT be thought of as being indicative of you being "weak".

                  Having to be witnesses to suicides, accidental deaths, and deaths due to traffic collisions or deliberate criminal actions are just some of the non-perquistes that we are stuck with in this line of unreal work.
                  #32936 - Royal Canadian Mounted Police - 1975-10-27 / 2010-12-29
                  Proud Dad of #54266 - RCMP - 2007-02-12 to date
                  RCMP Veterans Association - Regina Division member
                  Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada - Associate (Retired) member
                  "Smile" - no!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Just don't forget that many many can go by and won't affect you really at all. Then you will have one that will really bug you. This can happen for different reasons, the most common being the deceased is familiar to you in some way. Not necessarily familiar in that you know them. Familiar in maybe just one aspect like age range (similar to mother, grandmother, spouse, child, etc) or looks etc.

                    Just be prepared for the one that will eventually knock you on your ***.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PeteBroccolo
                      I would suggest, Dante, that, in addition to your seeking advice and opinions on this forum, you also sit down with any professional and/or volunteer peer counsellor(s) that your Agency has available. Talking face-to-face with someone trained to do this type of work is a good thing and should NOT be thought of as being indicative of you being "weak".

                      Having to be witnesses to suicides, accidental deaths, and deaths due to traffic collisions or deliberate criminal actions are just some of the non-perquistes that we are stuck with in this line of unreal work.
                      I agree completely. If something is bugging you, talk to proffesionals. DO NOT sit on that stuff. That is why we Officers are always turning to alcohol and other self destructive habits.

                      Take care of yourself in this field... no one else will.
                      Retired 02/01/13

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Dante,


                        It's okay to feel "numb". It's okay to be sad, angry, or anything else. Actually, I'd be a little concerned if you went to your first suicide and didn't feel anything.

                        Just don't let it consume you. Find someone you can talk to and talk to them if it continues to weigh on your mind. And know that this won't be the last one you see.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by PeteBroccolo
                          I would suggest, Dante, that, in addition to your seeking advice and opinions on this forum, you also sit down with any professional and/or volunteer peer counsellor(s) that your Agency has available. Talking face-to-face with someone trained to do this type of work is a good thing and should NOT be thought of as being indicative of you being "weak".

                          Having to be witnesses to suicides, accidental deaths, and deaths due to traffic collisions or deliberate criminal actions are just some of the non-perquistes that we are stuck with in this line of unreal work.
                          I also need to agree with this post. For a long time I never sought out help because it made me feel like I was weak and less of a man (ie. real men don
                          It's 106 miles to Chicago, we've got a full tank of gas, half a pack of cigarettes, it's dark, and we're wearing sunglasses....Hit it!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Sorry to say, but you'll eventually view dead bodies as mere objects that you need to deal with. If you let every death you see on the job get to you, then you won't last more than a few years. If you work for even a moderately busy agency, you're going to see a LOT of death scenes.

                            Put it into perspective.

                            1) Does the death of this person directly impact you? The answer is almost always "No". If the answer is "Yes", then you should be relieved, immediately.

                            2) Are there any special circumstances about the death that might be a problem for you (murder, suicide, children involved, etc.)? If so, refer back to Rule #1.

                            3) If the person has been dead for awhile, and is therefore "aromatic", you're going to be stuck waiting for the M.E. or funeral home. The stench will attach itself to everything, including your uniform and your hair. If you have a bad stinker, after the body is removed, request the rest of your shift off to clean-up. No reasonable supervisor will deny that.

                            4) When you do "clean-up", immediately take all uniform items, drop them into a dry-cleaning bag, put that bag into the garage, or outside, and then take a shower. FOREWARNED: You will smell the stench of death coming off you, especially your hair. Keep scrubbing until it's gone.
                            Talk sense to a fool, and he will call you foolish - Euripides

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Delta784
                              Sorry to say, but you'll eventually view dead bodies as mere objects that you need to deal with. If you let every death you see on the job get to you, then you won't last more than a few years. If you work for even a moderately busy agency, you're going to see a LOT of death scenes.

                              Put it into perspective.

                              1) Does the death of this person directly impact you? The answer is almost always "No". If the answer is "Yes", then you should be relieved, immediately.

                              2) Are there any special circumstances about the death that might be a problem for you (murder, suicide, children involved, etc.)? If so, refer back to Rule #1.

                              3) If the person has been dead for awhile, and is therefore "aromatic", you're going to be stuck waiting for the M.E. or funeral home. The stench will attach itself to everything, including your uniform and your hair. If you have a bad stinker, after the body is removed, request the rest of your shift off to clean-up. No reasonable supervisor will deny that.

                              4) When you do "clean-up", immediately take all uniform items, drop them into a dry-cleaning bag, put that bag into the garage, or outside, and then take a shower. FOREWARNED: You will smell the stench of death coming off you, especially your hair. Keep scrubbing until it's gone.

                              Holy shizzle! Delta, you're back? Awesome man, there was a rumor going around saying you left the forum, glad to see it was just a rumor.
                              Last edited by IloveAmerica; 09-28-2005, 10:52 AM.

                              Comment

                              MR300x250 Tablet

                              Collapse

                              What's Going On

                              Collapse

                              There are currently 5278 users online. 294 members and 4984 guests.

                              Most users ever online was 26,947 at 07:36 PM on 12-29-2019.

                              Welcome Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X