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Being Competitive vs. Team Player

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  • Being Competitive vs. Team Player

    When I was attending my last Explorers' academy some of the instructors stated how it was important to be competitve when attempting to become an LEO. They said you should do everything in your power that is legal to get an advantage over someone else. This is for both preparing your self to be processed and during the academy. My question is how can you be competitive while still being a team player and not being thought of as greedy?

  • #2
    Am not sure what you mean with respect to testing.

    Written, oral, physical agility, medical, background, etc. There are no opportunities in the process to be a team player unless you help cheer the others on during the physical agility.

    The academy is pass/fail unless you want to be at the top of the class. Even then, it's only an ego thing. You will still be a wet behind the ears rookie, so being number 1 won't get you far after graduation. I'm not saying to slack off in the academy. Obviously you want to learn as much as possible, but not by walking over the bodies of your classmates.

    Teamwork in the academy does have its benefits in the long run. As your career progresses, your classmates will be a lot more likely to help and support someone who worked and played well with others, than someone who has a track record of only being out for himself.

    In short, do the absolute best you can in the testing process and learn as much as you can in the academy. But don't stab your friends in the back in the process. You won't last long if you do.
    Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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    • #3
      The best way to have an "advantage" is to be yourself. I can't speak for other depts. but here we expect to see YOU and theexperince you have had.
      Life experience is very important, the more of it you have the better af an applicant you will be.

      TGY
      Disclaimer: The writer does not represent any organization, employer, entity or other individual. The views expressed are those only of the writer. In the case of a sarcastic, facetious, nonsensical, stirring-the-pot, controversial or devil's advocate-type post, the views expressed may not even reflect those of the writer [This sig stolen from Brickcop who stole it from Frank Booth].

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      • #4
        Originally posted by That Guy
        Life experience is very important, the more of it you have the better af an applicant you will be.

        TGY
        That is very true. Your answer not only applies to law enforcement employment but in other field of employment as well.

        Good answer.

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        • #5
          The idea is to do your best at all times. Think of the way that a professional sports team operates. They all work together towards a common goal, but at the same time they are fiercely competitive. There's a time to be competitive against the other team (in police work, the bad guys), and a time to be competitive against your teammates (like when you go up for a promotional exam). But, in every effort, you put on your "A" game.

          No one likes losing, but when you lose to someone because they were flat out better than you were, you haven't got much room to complain. Be the guy that everyone knows will give it all he has, every time, and you'll get the job and the respect of everyone in it.
          Tim Dees, now writing as a plain old forum member, his superpowers lost to an encounter with gold kryptonite.

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          • #6
            Should you not be in class instead of posting here ?
            Both are key elements of success.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Tim Dees
              The idea is to do your best at all times. Think of the way that a professional sports team operates. They all work together towards a common goal, but at the same time they are fiercely competitive. There's a time to be competitive against the other team (in police work, the bad guys), and a time to be competitive against your teammates (like when you go up for a promotional exam). But, in every effort, you put on your "A" game.

              No one likes losing, but when you lose to someone because they were flat out better than you were, you haven't got much room to complain. Be the guy that everyone knows will give it all he has, every time, and you'll get the job and the respect of everyone in it.
              My problem is that I found out about a special opportunity and what everyone told me at the academy keeps running through my mind. The issue is that there are only a few positions available for this special opportunity and I feel I'm being greedy by not telling any of my partners about it becasue that could lessen my chance to get the position if I tell them about it and they decide they like it too. What should I do?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by LT. EXPLORER
                My problem is that I found out about a special opportunity and what everyone told me at the academy keeps running through my mind. The issue is that there are only a few positions available for this special opportunity and I feel I'm being greedy by not telling any of my partners about it becasue that could lessen my chance to get the position if I tell them about it and they decide they like it too. What should I do?
                That puts things in a different light. Your agency should make reasonable efforts to notify potential candidates and if they have their wits about them, they should be making efforts on their own to learn about opportunities such as this. So, there is really no duty on your part to tell them. In addition, telling them (thus creating competition for yourself) may create the impression in the minds of the brass that you really don't want the job.

                If asked by others about the position, I wouldn't lie. But I wouldn't volunteer it without being asked.
                Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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                • #9
                  The only reason why you think it could lessen your chances of getting that opportunity is that you think you're not the best person for it. Get that sh*t out of you mind and do your best.

                  Always give 100%, 100% of the time. Just don't be a "Spotlight Ranger". Someone who only looks to be giving 100% when an instructor is watching, or if there is some sort of incentive or reward.
                  Whitechapel - Hate Creation

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                  • #10
                    Always Look Out For #1
                    ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR OWN ACTIONS, DON'T BLAME OTHERS!!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by L-1
                      That puts things in a different light. Your agency should make reasonable efforts to notify potential candidates and if they have their wits about them, they should be making efforts on their own to learn about opportunities such as this. So, there is really no duty on your part to tell them. In addition, telling them (thus creating competition for yourself) may create the impression in the minds of the brass that you really don't want the job.

                      If asked by others about the position, I wouldn't lie. But I wouldn't volunteer it without being asked.
                      Thaks for the advice, nicely said!

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                      • #12
                        Another thought about this. If you are an Explorer Lieutenant (meaning you are a leader for other Explorers) I believe it is your obligation to inform those below you about the position.
                        Hail hail the gang's all here, when the going gets tough I know my friends will still be there. - Drop Kick Murphys, "The Gang's all Here"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LT. EXPLORER
                          When I was attending my last Explorers' academy some of the instructors stated how it was important to be competitve when attempting to become an LEO. They said you should do everything in your power that is legal to get an advantage over someone else. This is for both preparing your self to be processed and during the academy. My question is how can you be competitive while still being a team player and not being thought of as greedy?
                          I like your thimking. Keeping that attidude will make you a good cop. You are worried that you will be coming off as greedy? Think of it this way, while you're in the testing process, you are not yet part of a team. On the other side of that coin, if you are a strong applicant, you can show leadership and assist those who are weaker.

                          Good luck buddy. P.S. - You sound more solid than some coppers in here, one in particular.
                          "Support Our Troops"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Depends on how you want to be perceived during your career. The officers who get the most respect, among their peers anyway, are the ones that are team players and are always there when you need them. The ones that always "look out for number one" are seldom around when the crap hits the fan. They were too busy searching cars to get that big drug bust and leaving their beats wide open so other people have to take their calls.

                            Don't stiff your buddies. Tell them the truth and let the chips fall where they fall. It sounds like you have a lot on the ball already and if your concerned about how others view your descision I think you'll feel a lot better ultimately if you are open about it.

                            Prepare yourself as much as possible to be a good candidate. Work hard and learn as much as you can. Earn respect by being a good officer. This is a tough job to do with a Lone Ranger mentality.
                            Government exists to protect us from each other. Where government has gone beyond its limits is in deciding to protect us from ourselves.

                            Ronald Reagan

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Welpe
                              Another thought about this. If you are an Explorer Lieutenant (meaning you are a leader for other Explorers) I believe it is your obligation to inform those below you about the position.
                              That is correct and that is what I do, but remember LT's sit on their *** while sgt.'s kick ***, I don't have to do it but I do. However what I'm talking about is outside of the explorer program.
                              Last edited by AmericanMan; 08-31-2005, 07:23 PM.

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