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  • Nice Police Cars

    I've noticed that there are alot of police departments that have 1 or 2 nice looking police cars other then Crown Vics or Impalas and so on. For example, police BMW,Mitsubishi Eclipse, Honda Accord, and of course the little more popular Ford Mustang and Chevy Camero. Is there a reason for an agency to have these vehicals? Does the city own theme? Do they need them?

  • #2
    If the cars are unmarked, there would seem to be a stealth factor. Nobody is going to be expecting the police to be in a Honda Accord. As for camaros and mustangs, I'd guess they are pursuit vehicles.

    It could be an image thing too, have a friendlier looking police car for community stuff.

    Comment


    • #3
      Lots of reasons.

      The really flashy or odd ones are usually donated by local auto dealers or are confiscated drug vehicles that have been converted to police use. Most serve in PR programs like DARE but others have specialty uses like beach patrol or parking enforcement (I once saw a VW bug painted black and white and used for parking). Many (mustangs and cameros) are used by state police or highway patrol agencies as low profile/high speed traffic enforcement vehicles.

      There are also a lot of test vehicles out there. Manufacturers will develop a car they would like to sell to the police community so they will loan a few prototypes to law enforcement agencies for evaluation. In the past, CHP has tested Volvos and (believe it or not) Toyota Camrays as road patrol vehicles.

      Finally, budgets may be a cause as well. In the 1970s a small PD in Washington with an even smaller budget began driving tiny Renault Le Cars, because their costs was less than 1/2 of traditional cars. I also remember an agency near Fresno that had a car so compact that the flashing amber light had to be mounted in the middle of the back deck (instead of the side) because that was the only place it would fit.
      Going too far is half the pleasure of not getting anywhere

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      • #4
        What my friend and I would like to know is why the RCMP in Vancouver needs a Jaguar, Land Rover, Mercedes, and a PT Cruiser for school liasion. Isn't that kind of a waste of federal tax dollars?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Spee-Dee
          What my friend and I would like to know is why the RCMP in Vancouver needs a Jaguar, Land Rover, Mercedes, and a PT Cruiser for school liasion. Isn't that kind of a waste of federal tax dollars?
          As L-1 said, those type of vehicles in use by the RCMP in BC/"E" Division at some of the big LMD Detachments were loaned to them by the various car dealers for school liaison, DARE, community policing & public relation activities. The only costs involved are fuel and maintenance.

          Here in Saskatchewan/"F" Division, we don't have a program like that with the auto dealers as we do not have large enough Detachments to be able to use such specialized vehicles. We do have one Camaro fixed up for DARE presentations and parades, but it is NOT used for patrol work - most often, it is trailered to such events.

          With the demise of the Firebird and Camaro, we will no longer be using those cars of course; the last one we had in Regina bit the dust in May. We will probably not bother going with the Mustang, as they are, as were the Firebird and Camaro, impractical for our current philosophy of Traffic Services (impaired, seat belt, intersection control and other high-risk driving violations) compared to our old "Highway Patrol" focus of speed enforcement (still a high-risk violation, but not our main raison d'etre).
          #32936 - Royal Canadian Mounted Police - 1975-10-27 / 2010-12-29
          Proud Dad of #54266 - RCMP - 2007-02-12 to date
          RCMP Veterans Association - Regina Division member
          Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada - Associate (Retired) member
          "Smile" - no!

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          • #6
            Now this is cool!! They look cooler in person even.
            "Respect for religion must be reestablished. Public debt should be reduced. The arrogance of public officials must be curtailed. Assistance to foreign lands must be stopped or we shall bankrupt ourselves. The people should be forced to work and not depend on government for subsistence." - Cicero, 60 B.C.

            For California police academy notes go to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CABasicPolice/

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by PeteBroccolo
              As L-1 said, those type of vehicles in use by the RCMP in BC/"E" Division at some of the big LMD Detachments were loaned to them by the various car dealers for school liaison, DARE, community policing & public relation activities. The only costs involved are fuel and maintenance.

              Here in Saskatchewan/"F" Division, we don't have a program like that with the auto dealers as we do not have large enough Detachments to be able to use such specialized vehicles. We do have one Camaro fixed up for DARE presentations and parades, but it is NOT used for patrol work - most often, it is trailered to such events.

              With the demise of the Firebird and Camaro, we will no longer be using those cars of course; the last one we had in Regina bit the dust in May. We will probably not bother going with the Mustang, as they are, as were the Firebird and Camaro, impractical for our current philosophy of Traffic Services (impaired, seat belt, intersection control and other high-risk driving violations) compared to our old "Highway Patrol" focus of speed enforcement (still a high-risk violation, but not our main raison d'etre).
              So what does Saskatchewan Highway patrol do exactly then in Saskatchewan. In Saskatoon all I ever see them do I sit in Tim Hortons, drive one way down the highway, get to a town, and then drive back to the city, go to the detachment and then back out onto the highway. I'm also told that it's rather boring here.

              Comment


              • #8
                Like L-1 mentioned, many of the "specialty" vehicles are either seized from criminals or donated by organizations. Some of them are obtained through grants.

                There were a couple of Florida Highway Patrol Corvettes a few years ago. The Corvettes were part of a court decision and forfeited to the Highway Patrol. A trooper that began an investigation, and was able to prove a pretty large car dealership was tampering with the odometers on cars to make them have fewer miles. Part of the penalty included the vehicles be turned over to the investigating agency. (Instead of giving the cars to higher ranking staff members, the Highway patrol elected to assign the Corvettes to the investigating troopers. This was one heck of a Thank You for the troopers. The cars were marked and were used for everyday enforcement duties)

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                • #9
                  Pittsburgh used to have the reeeaaaal small Dodge OMNI for the community resource people. BUT once in awhile, nothing would be left so we had to take one on the road.One slowly rotating red and one slowly rotating blue light. But the A/C was colder than a witches [email protected] in hell
                  I got nothing for now

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Spee-Dee
                    So what does Saskatchewan Highway patrol do exactly then in Saskatchewan. In Saskatoon all I ever see them do I sit in Tim Hortons, drive one way down the highway, get to a town, and then drive back to the city, go to the detachment and then back out onto the highway. I'm also told that it's rather boring here.
                    In Sasakatchewan, or "F" Division as most of this Province (other than the Training Academy at Depot Division) is designated by the RCMP, we have Region Traffic Services Units located in Regina, Swift Current, Yorkton, Saskatoon, North Battleford and Prince Albert. TS members are Regular Members of the RCMP, and subject to transfer to other duties and locations within Saskatchewan, Canada and around the world, like other RCMP members. Our RTS Units are autonomous from the co-located Detachments where we are physically posted, under the command of an Inspector in Division HQ in Regina.

                    RTS members work either on our own, or with members of other Detachments, or with other RTS Units, concentrating on traffic enforcement, although we have the same authority of other RCMP members. Our main focus is Road Safety Vision 2010, wherein the Canadian Federal Government, with the support of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, RCMP, OPP and other Canadian Police Services, hopes to achieve the safest roads in the world by the year 2010.

                    The main priorities of RSV2010 are Impaired Driving, Seat Belt Use, Intersection Control and Other High-Risk Driving violations, which are the leading criminal/offence causal factors of death and injuries in Canada. These are the areas that members of the RCMP "F" Division Traffic Services concentrate on, but we also recover stolen vehicles and property, arrest persons wanted on outstanding warrants, and investigate persons subject of various probation and prohibition orders that we discover while conducting our traffic enforcement. RTS Unit members will back-up RCMP Detachment general duty and other investigative & support Unit members, as well as City Police and other Law Enforcement Agency members, but we generally do NOT deal with, nor conduct follow-up investigation, on non-traffic-enforcement-related matters (ie: thefts, break-ins, frauds, drugs, assaults).

                    How you would ever know, "...In Saskatoon all I ever see them do I sit in Tim Hortons, drive one way down the highway, get to a town, and then drive back to the city, go to the detachment and then back out onto the highway..." without riding along with our SRTS members, or following them for several shifts, is beyond me. If you gleaned this information from someone else, or from someone who gleaned it from someone else, then I can understand your misunderstanding.

                    The Province of Saskatchewan Highways and Transportation Department -Transport Compliance Branch has Traffic Officers who conduct inspections and enforcement of commercial transport vehicles, both via stationary weigh scale operations and roving patrols, often using a large converted van that is fitted out as a mobile inspection station. These Traffic Officers can deal with smaller, personal vehicles, and also deal with a limited range of Criminal Code (generally impaired or disqualified driving) and Provincial Statute (traffic, of course, as well as liquor) violations, but mainly are concerned with the big rigs.

                    SH&T-TCB is just one of the many non-RCMP LE Agencies that we RTS members work with, conducting vehicle stop-check programs with their TO, Revenue Officers (tobacco & fuel tax enforcement) and Conservation Officers (fish, bird and big game enforcement) from time to time.
                    #32936 - Royal Canadian Mounted Police - 1975-10-27 / 2010-12-29
                    Proud Dad of #54266 - RCMP - 2007-02-12 to date
                    RCMP Veterans Association - Regina Division member
                    Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada - Associate (Retired) member
                    "Smile" - no!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by e-man
                      Pittsburgh used to have the reeeaaaal small Dodge OMNI for the community resource people. BUT once in awhile, nothing would be left so we had to take one on the road.One slowly rotating red and one slowly rotating blue light. But the A/C was colder than a witches [email protected] in hell
                      Ha, I remember seeing the Pittsburgh PD Omni's driving around. I always figured they were non-sworn "gopher's" cars or parking enforcement or something.
                      Guns don't kill people. Chuck Norris kills People.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Someone mentioned wasting tax dollars. This is not always necessarily the case.

                        In 1997, as the D.A.R.E. Program Supervisor for my agency, I was assigned a brand new Chevy Camaro Police package coupe. (I wasn't the only one - one of my D.A.R.E. Officers also got one.)

                        We were constantly having to hear citizens comments about us driving "those fancy expensive sports cars".

                        Fortunately, I had been in on the purchasing process, and was able to "educate" these nice taxpayers that our "fancy expensive sports cars" actually cost about $3000 LESS than the Crown Vic Police packages that are standard issue for the large majority of Officers, Troopers, and Deputies all over the country.

                        Yup, you read correctly. At the time (1997) Crown Vics were going to LE agencies (in our area) for around $22000. We purchased the Camaros for $18900. These were fully equipped Camaro coupes with the LT1 V-8, power steering/brakes, auto transmission, AC, power windows and door locks, an AM/FM radio with cassette player, and all heavy duty everything.

                        The usual reply from the concerned citizens was a surprised and subdued, "Oh, really? I didn't know that." They usually calmed down real quick after hearing that.

                        As an aside, I actually had to talk Admin out of putting us in Corvettes. That's what they wanted to see the D.A.R.E. Officers in. Was able to convince them that as little room as there was in the Camaros, Vettes had even less. Anyone that's ever been a D.A.R.E. Officer knows that you occasionally have a lot of stuff to carry back and forth to your schools. Vettes would not have very practical.

                        The upside to those type of vehicles is that they get a lot of attention, especially from kids. They open a lot of conversations.
                        "Yes sir, I know you have rights."
                        "In fact, I know your rights better than you do!"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by PeteBroccolo





                          How you would ever know, "...In Saskatoon all I ever see them do I sit in Tim Hortons,
                          Well, I may have over-exaggerated that one. Everytime I get off work at 10:30 at night and I go for my after work coffee at Tim Hortons there's usually 4 RCMP cruisers lined up in the parking lot.

                          drive one way down the highway, get to a town, and then drive back to the city, go to the detachment and then back out onto the highway..." without riding along with our SRTS members, or following them for several shifts, is beyond me. If you gleaned this information from someone else, or from someone who gleaned it from someone else, then I can understand your misunderstanding.
                          I don't follow them (they're usually behind me and then pass me very very very very slowly {like, we're talking it takes around 45 seconds to pass} when they realize I won't speed up over the speed limit). I like to drive A LOT. (Only been driving for almost 4 years and already have over 250,000 km on my licence.) I get terrible gas mileage in the city and I like to drive fast so I take my driving out to the highway and I do the same thing; drive one way down the highway, get to a town, turn around and then drive back to the city. I assume they head back to the detachment because they don't really go anywhere else in the city beside Tim Hortons.

                          I got my "highway patrol in Saskatoon is boring" from my cousin-in-law who works here in the city doing highway patrol. I wish I could go on a ride-along so I could get a less ignorant understanding of what the RCMP do in Saskatoon, but I've been informed that now they only do ride-alongs for RCMP applicants and I'm about 8 years away from being ready the take the test.




                          The Province of Saskatchewan Highways and Transportation Department -Transport Compliance Branch has Traffic Officers who conduct inspections and enforcement of commercial transport vehicles, both via stationary weigh scale operations and roving patrols, often using a large converted van that is fitted out as a mobile inspection station. These Traffic Officers can deal with smaller, personal vehicles, and also deal with a limited range of Criminal Code (generally impaired or disqualified driving) and Provincial Statute (traffic, of course, as well as liquor) violations, but mainly are concerned with the big rigs.
                          Yes, I had the "wonderful" experience of getting to deal with one of these guys earlier in the spring this year at some roadside vehicle safety inspection. $500 in repairs later my dad was not too happy, considering the only real safety issue with my car was the cracked brakelines. Ah, but the guy was nice, and apparently according to the newspaper today won some sort of something and is doing some sort of championship in Florida with the NAIC or something.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Spee-Dee
                            Well, I may have over-exaggerated that one. Everytime I get off work at 10:30 at night and I go for my after work coffee at Tim Hortons there's usually 4 RCMP cruisers lined up in the parking lot.


                            It may sound, or look, like the old cop-joke about us being donut-addicts, but sometimes that is the closest-to-where-we-come-back-into-town, fastest-service, open-at-weird-hours, place around.


                            I don't follow them (they're usually behind me and then pass me very very very very slowly {like, we're talking it takes around 45 seconds to pass} when they realize I won't speed up over the speed limit). I like to drive A LOT. (Only been driving for almost 4 years and already have over 250,000 km on my licence.) I get terrible gas mileage in the city and I like to drive fast so I take my driving out to the highway and I do the same thing; drive one way down the highway, get to a town, turn around and then drive back to the city. I assume they head back to the detachment because they don't really go anywhere else in the city beside Tim Hortons.


                            Although we HAVE joint-authority, along with all Municipal PS members, for enforcement of Federal Statutes, the Criminal Code and all Provincial Statutes, within the various cities in Saskatchewan, enforcement within those city boundaries is NOT our main focus. Our main focus is enforcement in the RCMP Detachments' jurisdictions.


                            I got my "highway patrol in Saskatoon is boring" from my cousin-in-law who works here in the city doing highway patrol. I wish I could go on a ride-along so I could get a less ignorant understanding of what the RCMP do in Saskatoon, but I've been informed that now they only do ride-alongs for RCMP applicants and I'm about 8 years away from being ready the take the test.



                            So, are you saying that your cousin-in-law is a Regular Member of the RCMP assigned to the Saskatoon Region Traffic Services, or is a Traffic Officer with the Saskatchewan Highways & Transportation - Transport Compliance Branch, or is a member of Saskatoon PS assigned to their Traffic Detail? Either way, I may know your c-i-l. As far as ride-alongs go, it is a liability concern, so we have no say in this.



                            Yes, I had the "wonderful" experience of getting to deal with one of these guys earlier in the spring this year at some roadside vehicle safety inspection. $500 in repairs later my dad was not too happy, considering the only real safety issue with my car was the cracked brakelines. Ah, but the guy was nice, and apparently according to the newspaper today won some sort of something and is doing some sort of championship in Florida with the NAIC or something.
                            Better that you were spoken to, the problem identified, and you were made to correct it, before those cracked brakelines caused a collision. And I say "collision", rather than "accident", because IF something like that happened, it COULD HAVE BEEN (and obviously NOW HAS BEEN) prevented by proper inspection, maintenance and repair.
                            Last edited by PeteBroccolo; 08-14-2005, 02:33 PM.
                            #32936 - Royal Canadian Mounted Police - 1975-10-27 / 2010-12-29
                            Proud Dad of #54266 - RCMP - 2007-02-12 to date
                            RCMP Veterans Association - Regina Division member
                            Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada - Associate (Retired) member
                            "Smile" - no!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It may sound, or look, like the old cop-joke about us being donut-addicts, but sometimes that is the closest-to-where-we-come-back-into-town, fastest-service, open-at-weird-hours, place around.
                              I don't hold it against you guys. (If I did I'd be a hypocrite) I do find the fact that I never see them eating donuts and drinking coffee, but drinking ice caps and eating butter pecan starts instead somewhat amusing. (The RCMP are always breaking those typical police stereotypes.) I'm usually there at least 5 times a day if not more. At least you guys have good taste in coffee.




                              Although we HAVE joint-authority, along with all Municipal PS members, for enforcement of Federal Statutes, the Criminal Code and all Provincial Statutes, within the various cities in Saskatchewan, enforcement within those city boundaries is NOT our main focus. Our main focus is enforcement in the RCMP Detachments' jurisdictions.
                              Generally speaking, how big are these jurisidictions and why do they bother to pull people over within the city when it's the city police that patrol the city? Like, I'm not just talking about pulling me over repeatedly either. I've seen them pull other people over too.


                              So, are you saying that your cousin-in-law is a Regular Member of the RCMP assigned to the Saskatoon Region Traffic Services, or is a Traffic Officer with the Saskatchewan Highways & Transportation - Transport Compliance Branch, or is a member of Saskatoon PS assigned to their Traffic Detail?
                              What my understanding is that he's a regular RCMP member who does highway patrol. I know in Saskatoon there's traffic services and highway patrol and he's not traffic services.

                              Either way, I may know your c-i-l.
                              Ok, now I'm starting to get scared. No, you very well may if you patrol out around Weyburn because Weyburn is on the same highway that he usually patrols. (Although I don't quite remember how far Weyburn is from Saskatoon.) He's only been with the RCMP for about two years and only in the city for a little over a year, though.





                              Better that you were spoken to, the problem identified, and you were made to correct it, before those cracked brakelines caused a collision.
                              I know and I tell my dad that every time he yells at me for not ducking out of the way of the inspection on the road and opting to drive through the giant field to avoid it. (Nothing suspicious about doing that. )


                              And I say "collision", rather than "accident", because IF something like that happened, it COULD HAVE BEEN (and obviously NOW HAS BEEN) prevented by proper inspection, maintenance and repair.
                              Yeah, I got told that too because there was the possibility that I wouldn't have my car anymore when it came time to be re-inspected. I was planning on selling my car at the time. I was informed that if I did sell my car before it was repaired and something happened that I could have been held reliable because I knew about what was all wrong with my car. I'm not mad about having to fix the brakes. I'm annoyed by the little piece of missing plastic that "could eventually over time cause (my) vehicle to become unsafe." That little two inch piece of plastic was not cheap to repair thanks to an extremely long amount of labour required to repair it.

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